Lord of the Rings Art Director Now Designs Chainmail for Buildings

Kaynemaile
Kaynemaile

The process of creating chainmail hasn’t changed much over the last few thousand years. When artist Kayne Horsham first began designing the chainmail worn by the dwarves, elves, and orcs in the Lord of the Rings movies, he settled for links that had to be connected by hand. He’s since come up with a weaving process that’s faster, cheaper, and applicable on a much larger scale.

As Co.Design reports, Kaynemaile, a new type of building material, was inspired by Kayne Horsham’s time as creature, armor, and weapons art director for the Lord of the Rings trilogy. To assemble the chainmail used in costumes, the New Zealand-based designer and his crew made millions of rings out of plastic and joined them together one by one. The fully-linked garment was then dipped in silver to give it an authentic look.

It wasn’t until the series ended that Horsham came up with an approach that was both convenient and cost-effective. For his new technique, he uses an injection molding process that churns out massive sheets of polycarbonate chainmail. The material is lighter and stronger than glass, takes little energy to produce, and is completely recyclable. And it has 21st century uses outside of fantasy films and Renaissance fairs—Horsham is marketing the material as an “architectural mesh” to drape over the facades of buildings.

A sheet of Kaynemaile can be installed to block sunlight and keep a building’s interior cool during the summer months. It also protects parking complexes and exterior staircases against wind and rain. Indoors, smaller Kaynemaile screens can divide rooms and provide privacy in open office spaces.

Horsham’s creation was recently named best new architectural product at the NYCxDesign Awards. As part of the prize, he’s created an installation of different colored Kaynemaile that’s on display in Times Square in Manhattan through May 22. The material will appear on the streets of New York City once more in the form of art pieces adorning certain bridges and tunnels. You can watch video of a prototype designed for the Queensboro Bridge below.

[h/t Co.Design]

This $49 Video Game Design Course Will Teach You Everything From Coding to Digital Art Skills

EvgeniyShkolenko/iStock via Getty Images
EvgeniyShkolenko/iStock via Getty Images

If you spend the bulk of your free time playing video games and want to elevate your hobby into a career, you can take advantage of the School of Game Design’s lifetime membership, which is currently on sale for just $49. You can jump into your education as a beginner, or at any other skill level, to learn what you need to know about game development, design, coding, and artistry skills.

Gaming is a competitive industry, and understanding just programming or just artistry isn’t enough to land a job. The School of Game Design’s lifetime membership is set up to educate you in both fields so your resume and work can stand out.

The lifetime membership that’s currently discounted is intended to allow you to learn at your own pace so you don’t burn out, which would be pretty difficult to do because the lessons have you building advanced games in just your first few hours of learning. The remote classes will train you with step-by-step, hands-on projects that more than 50,000 other students around the world can vouch for.

Once you’ve nailed the basics, the lifetime membership provides unlimited access to thousands of dollars' worth of royalty-free game art and textures to use in your 2D or 3D designs. Support from instructors and professionals with over 16 years of game industry experience will guide you from start to finish, where you’ll be equipped to land a job doing something you truly love.

Earn money doing what you love with an education from the School of Game Design’s lifetime membership, currently discounted at $49.

 

School of Game Design: Lifetime Membership - $49

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The Tallest Cemetery Monument in New Orleans Was Built Out of Spite

baldeaglebluff, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0
baldeaglebluff, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

Spite has motivated many construction projects, from a 40-foot-tall fence in California to an 8-foot-wide home in Massachusetts. But when it comes to pettiness, few structures can beat Moriarty Monument in New Orleans's Metairie Cemetery. Reaching 80 feet high, the memorial to Mary Moriarty was an excuse for her widower to show off his wealth to everyone who rejected him.

New Orleans is famous for its cemeteries, which feature above-ground mausoleums. The soil in the region is too wet and swampy to dig traditional 6-foot graves, so instead, bodies are interred at the same level as the living. The most impressive of these graveyards may be Metairie Cemetery on Metairie Road and Pontchartrain Boulevard. Built in 1872, it lays claim to the most above-ground monuments and mausoleums in the city, the tallest of which is the Moriarty Monument.

The granite tomb was commissioned by Daniel A. Moriarty, an Irish immigrant who moved to New Orleans with little money in the mid-1800s. It was there he met his wife, Mary Farrell, and together they started a successful business and invested their new income into real estate. The couple was able to build a significant fortune this way, but Moriarty struggled to shake off his reputation as a poor foreigner. The city's upper class refused to accept him into their ranks—something Moriarty never got over. After his wife died in 1887, he came up with an idea that would honor her memory and hopefully tick off the pretentious aristocrats at the same time.

By 1905, he had constructed her the grandest memorial he could afford. In addition to the towering steeple, which is a topped with a cross, the site is adorned with four statues at the base. These figures represent faith, hope, charity, and memory, while the monument itself is meant to be a not-so-virtuous middle finger to all those who insulted its builder.

Gerard Schoen, community outreach director for Metairie Cemetery, told WGNO ABC, “The reason Daniel wanted his property to be the tallest was so his wife could look down and snub every 'blue blood' in the cemetery for all eternity." More than a century later, it still holds that distinction.

[h/t Atlas Obscura]