New Yorkers are going to see a lot of people stopping to take pictures of the horizon in the coming days. Manhattanhenge, a term used to describe the two days of the year when the Sun sets in perfect alignment with Manhattan's east-west street grid, will be visible at 8:13 p.m. on May 29 (half-sun, the preferred view for photographers) and 8:12 p.m. May 30 (full sun). Here's a sample of what you can expect to see.

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Manhattanhenge takes its name from the same phenomenon at Stonehenge, when the solstice Sun lines up perfectly with the large stones. To get the best view in the city, Dr. Jackie Faherty, an astrophysicist at the American Museum of Natural History, told The New York Times to stand as far east as you can and look west toward New Jersey. Cross streets that offer an ideal view include 14th, 23rd, 34th, 42nd, 57th, and 79th streets. She also recommends Gantry Plaza State Park in Queens as an option in a different borough.

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Can't make it to New York this week? Manhattanhenge will make another appearance on July 12 and July 13. If you want to know more about the phenomenon, the museum will be hosting a presentation by Faherty at Hayden Planetarium at 7 p.m. on July 11.

This story was updated in 2019.