What is the UV Index (and Why Should I Care About It)?

iStock
iStock

We’re so used to running for cover when we hear a rumble of thunder during the summer that it’s easy to forget that we’re just as exposed to the elements under a beautiful, cloud-free sky. Whenever the Sun's out (and even when it isn't), we're at risk for sunburns, which are caused by the Sun's ultraviolet, or UV, radiation. But just how serious is that risk on a given day? That's where the UV Index comes in.

Ultraviolet radiation falls next to visible light on the electromagnetic spectrum. The two wavelengths of UV rays that can cause injury are called UVA and UVB rays. Both types are dangerous over long periods of time, but UVB rays are thought to be the most dangerous. Excessive exposure to UVA and UVB rays can cause cell death, leading to painful sunburn, or, over time, some forms of skin cancer.

Earth’s atmosphere does a pretty good job protecting us from harmful UV rays, but it doesn’t completely block them out. Most ultraviolet radiation is absorbed by the ozone layer. Ozone is gas that’s usually situated more than twice as high above sea level as the cruising altitude of a commercial airliner. In the 1970s and 1980s, there was a concerted effort to eliminate the use of chemicals that deplete the ozone layer as people began to understand what its depletion would mean: overexposure to dangerous UV rays for humans, animals, and plants.

A map of the UV Index on June 9, 2017. NOAA/NWS/EPA

The UV Index was developed to tell us the level of solar radiation on a particular day, and thus, how susceptible we are to a sunburn. The UV Index is an open-ended scale that starts at 0, indicating the lowest level of danger, with the risk gradually increasing through a UV Index of 10. Any value above 10 indicates an extreme risk for harm from UV rays, with sunburns and eye damage occurring in just minutes.

The index is compiled daily using factors like ozone concentration in the atmosphere, expected cloud cover, and the elevation of a certain point above sea level. Greater ozone concentrations, more clouds, and a lower elevation will help prevent UV rays from reaching the ground. A bright, hot, sunny day can easily cause the UV Index to soar above 10.

Risk from UV rays doesn’t end with sunshine pouring out of the sky. Ultraviolet radiation can also be reflected, meaning that the danger for sunburns and eye damage increases around bright surfaces like a beach or the shimmering waters of a swimming pool. If your eyes have ever hurt after looking at snow on a sunny day, that painful condition is directly caused by UV rays reflecting off of the white surface.

One easy way to protect yourself from harmful UV radiation is to cover up. But clothing and hats don't deflect all UV rays. That's where sunscreen comes in. The best sunscreen to use is one that’s rated for both UVA and UVB protection with an SPF (sun protection factor) of at least 15 or higher, according to the FDA. (The American Academy of Dermatology suggests one with an SPF of 30 or higher.) A sunscreen’s SPF doesn’t relate to the amount of time you can spend in the sun, but rather the amount of protection offered by a particular formula. An SPF of 15 blocks 93 percent of UV rays, while SPF 50 is said to block 98 percent. (Some argue that sunscreens over SPF 30 are no more effective.) Whichever SPF you choose, don't forget the sunglasses—specially rated pairs can protect your eyes from radiation, and also help you channel your inner celebrity. Sounds like a win-win to us.

Amazon's Under-the-Radar Coupon Page Features Deals on Home Goods, Electronics, and Groceries

Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

Now that Prime Day is over, and with Black Friday and Cyber Monday still a few weeks away, online deals may seem harder to come by. And while it can be a hassle to scour the internet for promo codes, buy-one-get-one deals, and flash sales, Amazon actually has an extensive coupon page you might not know about that features deals to look through every day.

As pointed out by People, the coupon page breaks deals down by categories, like electronics, home & kitchen, and groceries (the coupons even work with SNAP benefits). Since most of the deals revolve around the essentials, it's easy to stock up on items like Cottonelle toilet paper, Tide Pods, Cascade dishwasher detergent, and a 50 pack of surgical masks whenever you're running low.

But the low prices don't just stop at necessities. If you’re looking for the best deal on headphones, all you have to do is go to the electronics coupon page and it will bring up a deal on these COWIN E7 PRO noise-canceling headphones, which are now $80, thanks to a $10 coupon you could have missed.

Alternatively, if you are looking for deals on specific brands, you can search for their coupons from the page. So if you've had your eye on the Homall S-Racer gaming chair, you’ll find there's currently a coupon that saves you 5 percent, thanks to a simple search.

To discover all the deals you have been missing out on, head over to the Amazon Coupons page.

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5 Ways to Help Victims of the West Coast’s Wildfires

A wildfire near Shaver Lake, California, earlier this month.
A wildfire near Shaver Lake, California, earlier this month.
David McNew/Getty Images

Wildfires continue to ravage millions of acres across California, Oregon, and Washington, and strong winds forecasted in some of those regions could aggravate the blazes. To prevent future fires, we need to focus on combating climate change through policy reform and sustainable living. But for people directly affected by the fires, their current needs are much more urgent: food, shelter, and funds. Here are five organizations that can help you help victims.

1. Red Cross

The Red Cross has about 600 workers coordinating meal distribution, installing victims in shelters and hotels, and providing other support across Northern California. You can donate to the cause by choosing “Western Wildfires” under “I Want to Support” on the donation page here.

2. GoFundMe

GoFundMe’s affiliated nonprofit, GoFundMe.org, has created a Wildfire Relief Fund for this particular outbreak of fires on the West Coast. You can make a donation to the overall fund here, or you can explore the separate hubs in the description to find individual GoFundMe pages to give to.

3. Los Angeles Fire Department Foundation

Unfortunately, the city of Los Angeles doesn’t allocate enough public funds to the fire department to equip firefighters with all the important gear they need. The Los Angeles Fire Department Foundation tries to fill those demands by providing things like hydration backpacks, thermal-imaging cameras, brush-clearing tools, and more. You can donate to the general fund here, or choose a specific fire station from the dropdown menu.

4. VEMAnet

VEMAnet (Volunteers for the Emergency Management of Animals Network), is an offshoot of the Good Shepherd Foundation, which links animal owners who need emergency help with volunteers who can transport and/or house their animals—anything from cats to cattle—temporarily. You can post details about what animals you can accommodate here; and if you or someone you know needs help evacuating any pets, you can request help or browse available listings here.

5. California Fire Foundation

The California Fire Foundation’s Supplying Aid to Victims of Emergency (SAVE) program distributes $250 gift cards to wildfire victims, so they can decide for themselves what their most pressing needs are. You can donate here.