This California Bus Stop Doubles as an Experimental Perfume Lab

Alan Nakagawa
Alan Nakagawa

At one Venice Boulevard bus stop in Los Angeles, you can get a spritz of perfume for the road. As CityLab reports, artist Alan Nakagawa recently installed Street Perfume Bus Stop, a work of public art that invites people to take a big old whiff of Los Angeles.

Nakagawa is the first to take part in the new Creative Catalyst artist-in-residence program from the Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs, working with the L.A. Department of Transportation to change how people perceive the city’s streets.

People gather at night under the bus stop awning. The “try street perfume” box glows blue.
Alan Nakagawa

When visitors approach the bus stop, they’re invited to stick their hands inside a small machine that reads “try street perfume.” If they’re daring enough to do so, they get a spray of one of three perfumes Nakagawa designed himself at the Institute for Art and Olfaction, a non-profit in L.A. devoted to all things scent.

The first scent that debuted with the installation was named “Into Town,” which was based on the tradition of sweaty California cowboys rubbing sagebrush all over their bodies when they couldn’t bathe before heading into town. In late June, the stop began offering “Economic Development,” a lavender scent that morphs into a coffee smell. This perfume was inspired by the debate over gentrification. Next up is “Hollywood Springtime," designed to be a flowery, pleasant smell that you immediately forget—just like you forget about weather when you live in always-temperate L.A.

Nakagawa’s previous transportation art created during his residence includes an LADOT-themed zine and haikus installed on bike lane signs across town.

[h/t CityLab]

95 Years of The New Yorker Covers Visualized by Color

Screenshot via C82
Screenshot via C82

On February 21, 1925, The New Yorker appeared on the magazine scene with a cover illustration of a dandy drawn by art editor Rea Irvin, a character later christened Eustace Tilley. Almost a century later, Tilley still graces the cover of The New Yorker at least once a year on the magazine’s anniversary. Other weeks, they commission artists to illustrate timely political topics and evergreen moods.

The magazine has run more than 4600 covers in its 92 years of near-weekly issues (it’s currently published 47 times a year), all of which you can explore by color, thanks to designer Nicholas Rougeux (who has previously visualized sentences and punctuation in classic literature).


Using an algorithm, Rougeux analyzed the top five colors represented in every cover illustration and created a color palette for that issue. Then, he mapped out a palette for every single cover, creating a timeline of New Yorker design. It allows you to see what colors have dominated particular years and decades. If you scroll over the individual palettes, you can see the full image of that week’s cover.


Rougeux found some trends in the colors that have repeatedly graced the magazine’s cover. “Limited and muted palettes were used the 1920s," he writes on his site, while "possibly due to printing limitations, darker greens were more common in the 1940s, lighter palettes were used in the 1970s and 1980s, louder contrasting palettes were popular in the 1990s and more well-rounded palettes started being used since the 2000s.”

You can explore the color timeline for yourself here.

All images courtesy Nicholas Rougeux

Bob Ross's Son Is Holding Painting Classes at a Tennessee Library

Bob Ross.
Bob Ross.
Bob Ross Inc.

For anyone who has ever logged on to the internet, Bob Ross needs no introduction. The painter, who passed away in 1995, spent the years 1983 through 1994 hosting the PBS series The Joy of Painting, where his soothing manner and bubbling-spring landscapes comforted viewers.

On several episodes, Bob’s son, Steve Ross, could be seen painting his own nature scenes as guest host or assisting his father in answering reader questions.

According to WVLT, Steve Ross is now set to offer painting classes at the Blount County Public Library in Maryville, Tennessee. He will be joined by Dana Jester, an artist who also appeared on The Joy of Painting. The workshops will be held March 4 through March 8 and will cost $125 per attendee, who will also be expected to bring their own supplies. The classes will last the entire day.

If locals are curious and don’t want to commit to the fee, Steve and Dana will be hosting a free demonstration on March 5 at 6:30 p.m.

After his guest spots on his father’s program, Steve appeared to retreat from public life, though clips of his appearances were apparently popular on Tumblr for their inadvertently risqué banter. (“It can be dirty, it doesn’t have to be clean,” and so forth.)

Bob Ross also taught classes even while The Joy of Painting was airing. He purportedly received no income from that show, earning a living via merchandising and appearances.

[h/t WVLT]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER