In Pursuit of Guinness Fame, Two Men Ride the Entire Boston Subway System in Record-Setting Time

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iStock

Two intrepid commuters may have ridden the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) all the way into the Guinness World Records, according to The Boston Globe. On Friday, August 18, locals Alex Cox and Dominic DiLuzio visited every single stop in the city's subway system (more than 125 stations) in a little under 7.5 hours. The record they hope to snag—completing the journey in the fastest time possible— is both unofficial and brand-new, but the two hope to make it an official Guinness World Record category once they submit photos, videos, a log book, and other documentation.

DiLuzio conceived the stunt more than two years ago, after learning of another Beantown resident who completed the challenge in about 8 hours, simply for bragging rights. Cox, who works for the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, was fair game for the project, so DiLuzio recruited him as a partner after submitting an application to Guinness.

On August 18, after months of planning, DiLuzio and Cox woke up bright and early to board a 5:24 a.m. Red Line train at Alewife Station. Amid much jostling, running, bladder-holding, and live-tweeting, the duo finished the entire Red Line in just 90 minutes, before tackling the Mattapan, Orange, Green, and Blue lines. During the final stretch of the trip, the record-seekers were joined by some MBTA officials, according to New England Cable News.

Right before 1 p.m., DiLuzio and Cox reached the Blue Line’s Wonderland stop, signaling the end of their journey. There, they celebrated the ride—which was reportedly around 15 minutes shorter than their predecessor's attempt—with friends, MBTA officials, and media.

“I think everything went incredibly smoothly. We didn’t have any major delays, any breakdowns,” Cox said, according to CBS Boston. "A couple of hiccups here and there, but we stuck exactly to our plan and I can’t believe we did it in the time that we did."

In a few months, DiLuzio and Cox will find out if their subway hustle scored them a Guinness Record, placing them among company like lawyer Matthew Ahn, who rode all 469 New York City subway stops in under 22 hours. In the meantime, the MBTA—which didn’t sponsor or help plan the effort—is cheering the duo on.

[h/t The Boston Globe]

Goat Your Own Way: In North Wales, a Herd of Goats Is Taking Advantage of the Empty Streets

"We gon' run this town tonight!" —These goats, probably.
"We gon' run this town tonight!" —These goats, probably.
Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

While residents stay indoors to prevent the spread of coronavirus, the deserted streets and flower gardens of Llandudno, Wales, have become a playground for a people-shy herd of wild Kashmir goats.

The animals live on the Great Orme, a nearby stretch of rocky limestone land that juts out over the Irish Sea, and they’re known to sojourn in Llandudno around this time when rainy or windy weather makes their high-ground home more treacherous than usual. This year, however, the goats are being especially adventurous.

“They are curious, goats are, and I think they are wondering what's going on like everybody else,” town councilor Carol Marubbi told BBC News. “There isn't anyone else around, so they probably decided they may as well take over.”

The goats have spent their jaunt balancing atop stone walls, trotting through the town center, and munching on flowers and hedges in people’s yards. But nobody seems to mind—Marubbi told BBC News that the locals are proud of the animals and happy to watch them gallivant through the streets from their windows.

While the herd has been living on the Great Orme for more than a century, the goats aren’t native to the region. According to Llandudno’s website, Squire Christopher Tower bought two goats from a large herd in France that had been imported from Kashmir, India. He then used them to breed his own herd in England. Sometime during the 18th century, he gifted two of them to King George IV, who developed another herd at Windsor. The goats’ wool was used to produce cashmere shawls, which became particularly popular during Queen Victoria’s reign in the mid-19th century. She then gave two goats to Major General Sir Savage Mostyn, who took them to his family estate, Gloddaeth Hall, in Llandudno.

It’s unclear why or how they were eventually let loose on the Great Orme, but they managed to acclimate to their new environment and thrive in the northern wilderness.

Today, there are more than 120 goats in the herd, and it certainly looks like they’re enjoying their all-inclusive vacation.

[h/t BBC News]

Take a Virtual Tour of Space Mountain and Other Famous Disney World and Disneyland Rides

cholprapha/iStock via Getty Images
cholprapha/iStock via Getty Images

Disneyland in California and Walt Disney World in Florida closed in mid-March due to the COVID-19 crisis, and it's unclear when the parks will reopen. Spending time in a crowded place with thousands of strangers from around the world is the last thing you should want to do right now, but if you're craving some Disney magic at home, there's a way to experience the rides while social distancing.

As Travel + Leisure reports, most major rides at Disneyland and other Disney parks are available online as virtual tours. That includes classics like Space Mountain, Pirates of the Caribbean, and It's a Small World, as well as newer rides like Frozen Ever After and Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance.

Even though the virtual ride-throughs aren't official Disney productions, many of them document the ride experience in impressively high quality. This recording of Mickey & Minnie's Runaway Railway at Walt Disney World's Hollywood Studios in Orlando was filmed with a 360-degree camera.

You can also use YouTube to explore exclusive attractions at Disney parks outside the U.S. The video below shows a ride-through of Mystic Manor, Hong Kong Disneyland's version of The Haunted Mansion, in 4K resolution.

Transporting yourself to Disney for 10 minutes at a time is a great way to escape while you're quarantined at home. For more ways to combat boredom, check out these online classes and activities, as well as other virtual tours you can take from the comfort of your couch.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

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