The World’s Largest Rubber Duck

Measuring nearly 46 feet tall by 55 feet long, Dutch conceptual artist Florentijn Hofman’s Rubber Duck is making waves across the globe. Its most recent splashdown is in Hong Kong, where it will sit in Victoria Harbour through June 2, making passersby feel like children again, both in spirit and in stature.

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Movies in Color takes iconic film stills and breaks them down into their corresponding color palettes, updating daily, with an option to search by cinematographer.

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The Herschel Observatory officially reached the end of its helium supply this past week, marking the mission’s shutdown after nearly four years of capturing truly stunning images of outer space.

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What does the average human look like? Wikipedia editors had to argue it out amongst themselves in choosing a single image to illustrate the article entitled “Human,” and the lucky winning image that gets to represent the entire human race is of a northern Thai couple from an indigenous hill tribe, carrying a banana plant.

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This rare recording of the Beatles playing through a number of White Album outtakes at George Harrison’s home in Esher, England is unusually clear for a bootleg album, and the acoustic renditions put quite a different spin on well-known staple songs.

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Even the cutest kids can be truly terrifying sometimes, as a recent Reddit thread on “the creepiest thing your young child has ever said to you” proves.

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The Tony Awards will take place on June 9 this year, so in the lead-up to the awards ceremony, here’s a full list of the nominees with some highlight clips.

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The Netherlands just crowned the first Dutch king in over a hundred years. Goodbye, Queen Beatrix; hallo en welkom, King Willem-Alexander Claus George Ferdinand.

This $49 Video Game Design Course Will Teach You Everything From Coding to Digital Art Skills

EvgeniyShkolenko/iStock via Getty Images
EvgeniyShkolenko/iStock via Getty Images

If you spend the bulk of your free time playing video games and want to elevate your hobby into a career, you can take advantage of the School of Game Design’s lifetime membership, which is currently on sale for just $49. You can jump into your education as a beginner, or at any other skill level, to learn what you need to know about game development, design, coding, and artistry skills.

Gaming is a competitive industry, and understanding just programming or just artistry isn’t enough to land a job. The School of Game Design’s lifetime membership is set up to educate you in both fields so your resume and work can stand out.

The lifetime membership that’s currently discounted is intended to allow you to learn at your own pace so you don’t burn out, which would be pretty difficult to do because the lessons have you building advanced games in just your first few hours of learning. The remote classes will train you with step-by-step, hands-on projects that more than 50,000 other students around the world can vouch for.

Once you’ve nailed the basics, the lifetime membership provides unlimited access to thousands of dollars' worth of royalty-free game art and textures to use in your 2D or 3D designs. Support from instructors and professionals with over 16 years of game industry experience will guide you from start to finish, where you’ll be equipped to land a job doing something you truly love.

Earn money doing what you love with an education from the School of Game Design’s lifetime membership, currently discounted at $49.

 

School of Game Design: Lifetime Membership - $49

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How the Trapper Keeper Trapped the Hearts of '80s and '90s Kids

Courtesy of Cinzia Reale-Castello
Courtesy of Cinzia Reale-Castello

No matter when or where you grew up, back-to-school shopping typically revolved around two things: clothing and school supplies. And if you’re an adult of a certain age, you probably had a Trapper Keeper on that latter list of must-buy items.

Like the stickers, skins, and cases that adorn your smartphones and laptops today, Trapper Keepers were a way for kids to express their individual personalities. The three-ring binders dominated classrooms in the '80s and '90s, and featured a vast array of designs—from colorful Lisa Frank illustrations to photos of cool cars and popular celebrities—that allowed kids to customize their organizational tools. 

In this episode of "Throwback," we're ripping open the Velcro cover and digging into the history of the Trapper Keeper. You can watch the full episode below.

Be sure to head here and subscribe so you don't miss an episode of "Throwback," where we explore the fascinating stories behind some of the greatest toys and trends from your childhood.