When it sits still, Blossom resembles a handmade children's toy that's more basic than your average Barbie doll. But give it a moment and the soft, knitted body starts to move, bouncing and nodding in a way that doesn't make it seem any less warm and cuddly. Guy Hoffman of Cornell University designed Blossom to be a different type of robot, and he hopes his invention will eventually act as a social companion for kids with autism, Co.Design reports.

Kids who fall on the autism spectrum can have trouble picking up social cues like body language and facial expressions. Blossom could be used to demonstrate these interactions in an approachable way. Partnering with Google, Hoffman engineered his robot to watch YouTube videos and physically respond to the action on screen. By designing Blossom to detect and react to certain emotions, the idea is that it will teach the kids watching alongside it by example.

Hoffman understood that design is a crucial part of building an empathy robot. Instead of rigid metal, the skeleton is made from soft materials like rubber bands and silicon that make for imperfect, lifelike movements. The elements that are visible from the outside, like wooden ears and knitted wool, were chosen for their warmth and familiarity. Depending on how you dress it up, Blossom resembles a cat, a bunny, or an octopus.

Many of the items that make the device can be found around the household, and that's intentional. The goal is for families to one day build Blossoms of their own and pass them down generation to generation.

The project is still in its early stages, and details on when it will be introduced to kids—and how effective it will be—aren't yet clear.

For now you can experience Blossom's unconventional cuteness in the video below.

[h/t Co.Design]