Violet Mosse Brown, World’s Oldest Person, Dies at 117

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In April 2017, 117-year-old Violet Mosse Brown inherited the title of Oldest Living Person following the death of fellow 117-year-old Emma Morano, who was "the world's last living link to the 19th century" (as she was born in 1899).

According to the Jamaica Observer, Brown—who was affectionately known as “Aunt V”—passed away at the Fairview Medical Centre in Montego Bay at approximately 2:30 p.m. on Friday. Her death was announced on Twitter via Andrew Holness, Jamaica’s prime minister, who included a photo of him with Brown when he last visited her at her home.

While other centenarians have attributed their longevity to everything from exercise to lack of exercise, Brown—who was born on March 10, 1900—claimed her secret to a long life was hard work and an unbreakable faith.

“I was a cane farmer,” Brown told the AP in April. “I would do every work myself. I worked, me and my husband, over that hill.” She also credited her belief in God as an important part of her long life. “I spent all my time in the church. I like to sing. I spent all my time in the church from a child to right up [now].”

Brown’s husband, Augustus, died in 1997; and the eldest of her six children passed away in April, at the age of 97.

Brown’s death means that Japan’s Nabi Tajima—who just turned 117 on August 4—is now the world’s oldest surviving person.

[h/t: Jamaica Observer]

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Andrea Piacquadio / Pexels.com
Andrea Piacquadio / Pexels.com

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Mental Floss Is Up for a Webby Award—Here’s How to Help Us Win!

This woman doesn't work for us, but she sure is happy about our Webby Award nomination!
This woman doesn't work for us, but she sure is happy about our Webby Award nomination!
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The writers, editors, videographers, tech whizzes, and everybody else on the Mental Floss team began today like any other: guzzling coffee by the gallon, eager to deliver a blend of zany and informative content straight to the brains of our readers. By mid-morning, our makeshift home offices were buzzing with a heightened, electric energy—because we’d just been nominated for a Webby Award, and we’re really excited about it.

The International Academy of Digital Arts & Sciences (IADAS) has included Mental Floss in the “Weird” general website category, which highlights sites “that reflect a fresh perspective in thought and action strong enough to start a revolution, change a behavior pattern, or advance old thinking lodged in bad habits, or that are just plain weird.”

Basically, there are two winners for each category. The Webby Award is chosen by IADAS members like Arianna Huffington, Monica Lewinsky, Darren Aronofsky, and representatives from just about every other industry out there. The IADAS has honored Mental Floss with two Webby Awards in the past; the website won one in 2013 for best cultural blog, and John Green nabbed another in 2015 for being the much-beloved host of our YouTube channel.

The Webby People’s Voice Award, on the other hand, is voted on by the public. So if you think Mental Floss embodies any (or all) of the aforementioned criteria for Best Weird General Website, you can help us win a People’s Voice Award by voting here. We’re up against some steep competition, including Brand Name Pencils, the world’s largest collection of vintage brand-name pencils, and Amazon Dating, a completely fake dating site modeled after Amazon’s homepage.

Voting is open through Thursday, May 7, and the winners will be announced on Tuesday, May 19, before a special online celebration called “Webbys From Home” that’ll showcase some of the internet’s best content from the past year.

You can explore all the nominees and vote in other categories here.