13 Words That Knocked Out Spelling Bee Finalists

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The 87th Annual Scripps National Spelling Bee ended in a draw! Sriram Hathwar (right) and Ansun Sujoe are the first co-champions since 1962. If this year's Bee inspires you to brush up on your spelling, here are some words that have knocked out recent runners-up.

1. Schwarmerei, 2012 & 2004.

Note to future contestants: Learn the correct spelling of this German origin noun, which means excessive sentimentality, as it has knocked out two contestants in the final round in the past decade. One was 13-year-old Akshay Buddiga in 2004, who had famously fainted on stage only to get back up and correctly spell “alopecoid” earlier in the competition.

2. Sorites, 2011.

Concluding that there was a “p” at the beginning of this noun, which is a type of argument that has several successive premises leading to one conclusion, was the undoing of Canadian Laura Newcombe.

3. Terribilita, 2010.

An expression of intense anger or emotion, particularly in the conception or execution of a work of art. (Or the losing of a spelling competition? Three students tied for second place in 2010.)

4. Rhytidome, 2010.

The outermost layer of the bark of a tree.

5. Ochidore, 2010.

A little-used word for a shore crab. “Crustacean” would have been so much easier!

6. Menhir, 2009.

An upright stone or monolith, typically of prehistoric origin, knocked one contestant down in 2009.

7. Maecenas, 2009.

A patron of the arts, and nemesis to 12-year-old Tim Ruiter, who tied for second place in 2009.

8. Prosopopoeia, 2008.

A figure of speech in which an imaginary or absent person is speaking or acting caused 12-year-old first-timer Sidharth Chand to disappear in 2008.

9. Coryza, 2007.

A contagious disease affecting the upper respiratory tract. Damn those colds!

10. Weltschmerz, 2006.

A state of depression or apathy as a result of accepting the actual state of the world as opposed to an idealized version. Yep, sounds about right.  

11. Roscian, 2005.

An adjective used to describe a skilled actor, a tribute to Roman actor Quintus Roscius Gallus, who died in 62 BC. Like a pre-Julian Philip Seymour Hoffman.

12. Trouvaille, 2004.

Californian Aliya Deri didn’t consider this word—meaning windfall—much of a lucky break when it landed her in second place in 2004.

13. Gnathonic, 2003.

The “g” is silent in this adjective (which means fawning or obsequious), which explains its unfortunate omission in eighth-grader Evelyn Blacklock’s spelling of it in the final round.

How Coronavirus and 31 Other Infectious Diseases and Viruses Got Their Names

Rotavirus—from the Latin rota, for "wheel"—is named for the wheel-like appearance of its particles.
Rotavirus—from the Latin rota, for "wheel"—is named for the wheel-like appearance of its particles.
Dr_Microbe/iStock via Getty Images

As you may already know, the corona in coronavirus has no relation to a certain refreshing beer often served with a slice of lime. Corōna means “crown” in Latin—and Spanish and Italian, too—and virologists chose it in 1968 to describe the group of viruses characterized by crown-like spikes that protrude from their surfaces.

So how do other viruses and diseases get their names? Based on the infographic below, created by Adam Aleksic for his website, The Etymology Nerd, there isn’t just one way. Some, like the coronavirus, are named for how they look under a microscope. The rota in rotavirus, for example, which means “wheel” in Latin, reflects the virus’s wheel-like appearance when viewed beneath an electron microscope.

Others are named after the locations where they were discovered or studied. In 1947, scientists named a newly identified mosquito-borne virus after Uganda’s Zika Forest. In 1977, Yale researchers investigating a string of pediatric arthritis cases in the town of Lyme, Connecticut, started referring to the illness as “Lyme arthritis.” Later, the name was modified to “Lyme disease” when scientists realized patients were exhibiting other symptoms, too.

Still others are characterized by the symptoms they cause. People with tetanus—from the Greek tetanos, for “tension”—usually experience muscle stiffness, and the skin of yellow fever sufferers often takes on a yellow tint due to jaundice.

Find out the origins of malaria, measles, and more below. And follow The Etymology Nerd on Instagram for more fascinating etymological explanations.

etymology nerd infectious disease names infographic
Unsurprisingly, there's a lot of Latin in this infographic.

What Makes a Hotel Breakfast 'Continental'?

Hotels often offer a complimentary pastry and fruit breakfast.
Hotels often offer a complimentary pastry and fruit breakfast.
tashka2000/iStock via Getty Images

The continental breakfast, which is typically made up of pastries, fruit, and coffee, is often advertised by hotels as a free perk for guests. But why is it called continental, and why don’t patrons get some eggs and bacon along with it?

The term dates back to 19th century Britain, where residents referred to mainland Europe as “the continent.” Breakfast in this region was usually something light, whereas an English or American breakfast incorporated meat, beans, and other “heavy” menu options.

American hotels that wanted to appeal to European travelers began advertising “continental breakfasts” as a kind of flashing neon sign to indicate guests wouldn’t be limited to American breakfast fare that they found unappealing. The strategy was ideal for hotels, which saved money by offering some muffins, fruit, and coffee and calling it a day.

That affordability as well as convenience—pastries and fruit are shelf-stable, requiring no heat or refrigeration to maintain food safety—is a big reason continental breakfasts have endured. It’s also a carryover from the hybrid model of hotel pricing, where American hotels typically folded the cost of meals into one bill and European hotels billed for food separately. By offering a continental breakfast, guests got the best of both worlds. And while Americans were initially aghast at the lack of sausages and pancakes on offer, they’ve since come around to the appeal of a muffin and some orange juice to get their travel day started.

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