10 Facts About the Dwarf Planet Makemake

Within the Kuiper Belt—that ring of ices and volatile material beyond the orbit of Neptune—are all but one of the known dwarf planets in the solar system. Pluto is the largest of that class of planet, with Eris a close second. Next on that list is the plucky Makemake, a relatively reflective, distant, and dynamic world. From a distance of 4.26 billion miles, much about Makemake remains a mystery, though scientists are chipping away at the unknowns. Here are a few things they know—but you might not—about Makemake.

1. MAKEMAKE IS ONLY THREE TIMES AS LONG AS THE GRAND CANYON.

Makemake's orbit is a half-billion miles farther from the Sun than Pluto's. One day on the distant dwarf lasts nearly as long as ours does—22.5 hours—but the small world is in no rush to circle our star: One Makemakean year is 305 Earth years long. With a diameter of about 880 miles, the dwarf planet is about two-thirds the size of Pluto—and about three times the size of the 277-mile-long Grand Canyon—making it the 25th largest object in the solar system. That might not seem very impressive until you consider that there are hundreds of thousands of objects orbiting the Sun.

2. IT'S IMPRESSIVELY BRIGHT.

Despite being smaller than Pluto, Makemake is the second brightest object in the Kuiper Belt. Its reflective surface is a result of an abundance of methane and ethane ice present there; half-inch pellets of frozen methane may riddle its frigid surface. It's likely a reddish-brown hue, though its distance makes it hard to tell for sure.

3. IT WAS CALLED "EASTERBUNNY" …

Mike Brown of Caltech discovered Makemake a few days after Easter in 2005. (Brown also discovered the dwarf planets Eris and Haumea.) Before it received its formal name, Brown's team called it "Easterbunny." To other astronomers, its provisional name was "2005 FY9."

4. … BEFORE IT WAS OFFICIALLY NAMED AFTER AN EASTER ISLAND GOD.

In 2008, Easterbunny/2005 FY9 was designated a dwarf planet by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). When deciding what name to submit to the IAU, the proximal holiday led Brown to its namesake island (itself first visited by a European around Easter 1722), which led Brown to its people and their religious heritage. Makemake is the creator god of the Rapa Nui people of Easter Island.

5. MAKEMAKE IS PARTIALLY TO BLAME FOR PLUTO'S DEMOTION TO DWARF PLANET.

The discovery of Makemake and, just a few months before, Eris—which is larger than Pluto—forced astronomers to reconsider what, exactly, makes a planet a planet. A planet has to orbit the Sun, have enough mass that its gravity forces it into a round shape, and clear its immediate space neighborhood of other objects. Eris, Makemake, Pluto, and Haumea fail to meet all three criteria in one way or another. (Pluto's downfall: It doesn't clear its neighborhood.) After fierce debate among astronomers around the world, the IAU created the new category of "dwarf planet" for these objects—including Pluto. (Thanks, Makemake.)

6. MAKEMAKE'S SURFACE IS VOLATILE.

Makemake is no mere round rock in space. In many ways, it's a sibling of Pluto. Its surface, for example, is dominated by methane, a hyper-volatile compound that is also found on Pluto's surface. ("Volatile" means it reacts to changes in temperature.) "The processes on Pluto are driven by the movement of volatiles around the surface as temperatures change," says Alex Parker, a senior research scientist at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. "If a world has a volatile-dominated surface—like Makemake does—it probably has dynamic processes on it similar to Pluto."

7. ITS MOON WAS ONLY RECENTLY DISCOVERED.

JHU-APL

In the illustration above, Makemake has no moon. That's because it was only discovered in 2016 by Parker [PDF], who spotted it in data collected by the Hubble Space Telescope. "It was actually a very obvious satellite," he tells Mental Floss. "I didn't have to do too much digging into the data to get it to pop out; it just sort of stood out clear as day."

He continues: "As soon as I found it, I was also crestfallen, because I was sure other people who had done the preliminary analysis of the data would have almost certainly seen it—and that I would have been late to the party. My first question to the principal investigator of the program was, 'Hey, have you seen the moon in the Makemake data?' And I was sure the answer was going to be, 'Yes.' But it was, 'There's a moon in the Makemake data?' It was super exciting realizing that thing I was sure other people had spotted hadn't been and that I was the first to see it."

The moon's current official designation is S/2015 (136472), and it's nicknamed MK 2. More than 1300 times fainter than Makemake, it's estimated to be a mere 100 miles wide.

8. ASTRONOMERS ARE TRYING TO MAP MAKEMAKE WITH ITS MOON.

Makemake's moon is more than a celestial feature; it's a tool for scientists. As the 105-mile-wide object (nearly twice as long as the Panama Canal) and its planet pass in front of one another, astronomers can use the changes in brightness to map the Makemakean surface. "Just like we had preliminary maps of Pluto before we got there, we can actually use the moon as it passes in front of Makemake as a tool to map it," says Parker.

Specifically, as one object crosses the other, parts of the obscured object can be isolated. Astronomers can then derive the brightness of just the isolated part of the body (rather the whole body at once). Darker areas and lighter areas can then be mapped to the object, and models can help determine whether scientists are seeing terrain features, for example. They're not going to be naming mountains with this technique, but they can find interesting areas worth further study and modeling.

"There are many ways you can think of Makemake as a sort of Pluto prior to the New Horizons exploration. We are just starting to get glimpses of what it looks like," Parker says. "It could be this dynamic and active world, and I think that's exciting."

9. MUCH OF MAKEMAKE REMAINS MYSTERIOUS.

Scientists aren't sure how Makemake's day-night cycle influences its landforms and surface processes (which include things like geology or interactions between the atmosphere—if it has one—and the surface). The history and origin of its moon are also unknown, and raise other interesting questions for scientists. Theorists who work on planetary formation, and astronomers who study the motions of celestial objects, are revising their models to account for why moons are a defining feature for dwarf planets—including the weird ones—when half of the terrestrial planets in the solar system (Mercury and Venus) lack moons.

"Why are moons so ubiquitous among dwarf planets in the Kuiper Belt? At this point, every one of the largest objects in the Kuiper Belt [except one] has at least one moon," Parker says. "Some have two. Some have five. And so if you come up with a process for growing these planets [like accretion] ... one of the end states of that process needs to be that they all end up with at least one moon."

10. THERE ARE NO PLANS TO VISIT MAKEMAKE … YET.

No missions have yet been launched to Makemake, though the New Horizons spacecraft, having completed its reconnaissance of Pluto, has plunged deeper into the Kuiper Belt to study at least one other object there. Back on Earth, planetary scientists are considering frameworks for future Kuiper Belt missions. The development of new propulsion technologies by engineers will enable more science in single expeditions. In the longer term, orbiter missions will return to visited bodies and study them in finer detail. "Given how much variety there is in the Kuiper Belt," Parker says, "it's going to be a pretty exciting time as we shed light on these worlds."

The 10 Best Air Fryers on Amazon

Cosori/Amazon
Cosori/Amazon

When it comes to making food that’s delicious, quick, and easy, you can’t go wrong with an air fryer. They require only a fraction of the oil that traditional fryers do, so you get that same delicious, crispy texture of the fried foods you love while avoiding the extra calories and fat you don’t.

But with so many air fryers out there, it can be tough to choose the one that’ll work best for you. To make your life easier—and get you closer to that tasty piece of fried chicken—we’ve put together a list of some of Amazon’s top-rated air frying gadgets. Each of the products below has at least a 4.5-star rating and over 1200 user reviews, so you can stop dreaming about the perfect dinner and start eating it instead.

1. Ultrean Air Fryer; $76

Ultrean/Amazon

Around 84 percent of reviewers awarded the Ultrean Air Fryer five stars on Amazon, making it one of the most popular models on the site. This 4.2-quart oven doesn't just fry, either—it also grills, roasts, and bakes via its innovative rapid air technology heating system. It's available in four different colors (red, light blue, black, and white), making it the perfect accent piece for any kitchen.

Buy it: Amazon

2. Cosori Air Fryer; $120

Cosori/Amazon

This highly celebrated air fryer from Cosori will quickly become your favorite sous chef. With 11 one-touch presets for frying favorites, like bacon, veggies, and fries, you can take the guesswork out of cooking and let the Cosori do the work instead. One reviewer who “absolutely hates cooking” said, after using it, “I'm actually excited to cook for the first time ever.” You’ll feel the same way!

Buy it: Amazon

3. Innsky Air Fryer; $90

Innsky/Amazon

With its streamlined design and the ability to cook with little to no oil, the Innsky air fryer will make you feel like the picture of elegance as you chow down on a piece of fried shrimp. You can set a timer on the fryer so it starts cooking when you want it to, and it automatically shuts off when the cooking time is done (a great safety feature for chefs who get easily distracted).

Buy it: Amazon

4. Secura Air Fryer; $62

Secura/Amazon

This air fryer from Secura uses a combination of heating techniques—hot air and high-speed air circulation—for fast and easy food prep. And, as one reviewer remarked, with an extra-large 4.2-quart basket “[it’s] good for feeding a crowd, which makes it a great option for large families.” This fryer even comes with a toaster rack and skewers, making it a great addition to a neighborhood barbecue or family glamping trip.

Buy it: Amazon

5. Chefman Turbo Fry; $60

Chefman/Amazon

For those of you really looking to cut back, the Chefman Turbo Fry uses 98 percent less oil than traditional fryers, according to the manufacturer. And with its two-in-one tank basket that allows you to cook multiple items at the same time, you can finally stop using so many pots and pans when you’re making dinner.

Buy it: Amazon

6. Ninja Air Fryer; $100

Ninja/Amazon

The Ninja Air Fryer is a multipurpose gadget that allows you to do far more than crisp up your favorite foods. This air fryer’s one-touch control panel lets you air fry, roast, reheat, or even dehydrate meats, fruits, and veggies, whether your ingredients are fresh or frozen. And the simple interface means that you're only a couple buttons away from a homemade dinner.

Buy it: Amazon

7. Instant Pot Air Fryer + Electronic Pressure Cooker; $180

Instant Pot/Amazon

Enjoy all the perks of an Instant Pot—the ability to serve as a pressure cooker, slow cooker, yogurt maker, and more—with a lid that turns the whole thing into an air fryer as well. The multi-level fryer basket has a broiling tray to ensure even crisping throughout, and it’s big enough to cook a meal for up to eight. If you’re more into a traditional air fryer, check out Instant Pot’s new Instant Vortex Pro ($140) air fryer, which gives you the ability to bake, proof, toast, and more.

Buy it: Amazon

8. Omorc Habor Air Fryer; $100

Omorc Habor/Amazon

With a 5.8-quart capacity, this air fryer from Omorc Habor is larger than most, giving you the flexibility of cooking dinner for two or a spread for a party. To give you a clearer picture of the size, its square fryer basket, built to maximize cooking capacity, can handle a five-pound chicken (or all the fries you could possibly eat). Plus, with a non-stick coating and dishwasher-safe basket and frying pot, this handy appliance practically cleans itself.

Buy it: Amazon

9. Dash Deluxe Air Fryer; $100

Dash/Amazon

Dash’s air fryer might look retro, but its high-tech cooking ability is anything but. Its generously sized frying basket can fry up to two pounds of French fries or two dozen wings, and its cool touch handle makes it easy (and safe) to use. And if you're still stumped on what to actually cook once you get your Dash fryer, you'll get a free recipe guide in the box filled with tips and tricks to get the most out of your meal.

Buy it: Amazon

10. Bella Air Fryer; $52

Bella/Amazon

This petite air fryer from Bella may be on the smaller side, but it still packs a powerful punch. Its 2.6-quart frying basket makes it an ideal choice for couples or smaller families—all you have to do is set the temperature and timer, and throw your food inside. Once the meal is ready, its indicator light will ding to let you know that it’s time to eat.

Buy it: Amazon

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

How to See August’s Full Sturgeon Moon

It'd be pure lunacy to skip an opportunity to see this beauty.
It'd be pure lunacy to skip an opportunity to see this beauty.
mnchilemom, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

This summer has been an especially exciting time for avid sky-gazers—the NEOWISE comet flew close to Earth in mid-July, and the ongoing Perseid meteor shower is gearing up for its peak around August 11. Though full moons aren’t quite as rare, the sight of a glowing white orb illuminating the night is still worth a glance out your window.

When Is August’s Full Moon?

As The Old Farmer’s Almanac reports, the eighth full moon of 2020 will reach its peak at 11:59 a.m. EST on Monday, August 3. If that’s daytime where you live, you’ll have to wait for the sun to set that night, or you can catch it the night before—Sunday, August 2.

Why Is It Called a Sturgeon Moon?

Each month’s full moon has a nickname (or multiple nicknames), usually of folk origin, that coincides with certain plant, animal, or weather activity common at that time of year. January’s full moon, for example, was named the “wolf moon” because wolves were said to howl more often during January. June’s “strawberry moon” occurred when strawberries were ripe and ready to be picked.

Since people caught an abundance of sturgeon—a large freshwater fish that’s been around since the Mesozoic era—in the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain during this part of summer, they started calling August’s full moon the sturgeon moon. It has a few lesser-known monikers, too, including the “full green corn moon” (a nod to the approaching harvest season), and the slightly wordy “moon when all things ripen.”

[h/t The Old Farmer’s Almanac]