How to Walk Across Hot Coals

ThinkStock
ThinkStock

People have been scampering across hot coals for thousands of years. A bed of embers can exceed 1000°F, and the world’s hottest firewalk in 1997 actually topped 1750°F—the same temperature used for cremations. But with the right preparation, experts prance across them with barely a blister. Here’s how they do it.

1) Get Wood

A safe walk requires the right coals, usually cherry or maple wood. Hardwoods are excellent insulators, and they’ll protect feet from some of the heat—even when they’re aflame. (That’s why the wooden handle on a saucepan stays cool when you’re cooking.) Cherry or maple embers also glow a daunting red-orange, but they actually don’t burn as hot as other charcoals, like olive or locust woods.

2) Build a Runway

Once the fire has burnt down, rake the coals. This step makes the red-hot landing strip of doom look even more terrifying, but it will actually spread cold charcoal to the surface, adding insulation. Firewalkers also flatten the coals. Patting down a path keeps them from sinking into the sizzling embers, protecting the sensitive tops of your feet.

3) Break Out a Good Book

After making the fire, firewalkers need to kill time for about 20 minutes. Embers that still hold water can transfer heat to feet faster. Letting the coals dry means they won’t sear any soles. Then they sprinkle a thin layer of ash on top. Ash is a terrible heat conductor, and it can block some warmth radiating from the coals.

4) Just Add Water

After waiting for the bed to cool to a balmy 1000°F walkers dip their feet in some water. When liquid meets intense heat, it can form an insulating layer of steam. It’s called the leidenfrost effect, and it’s why you can snuff out a candle’s flame with two wet fingers. The moisture may act as a protective glove for feet.

5) Walk, Don’t Run

Once experts step onto the coals, they walk briskly and don’t stop. Their feet would sink into the ashpit if they run or hard-step. The lighter the stride, the less chance scorching cinders will wedge between their toes. Each step should last half a second or less.

6) Believe in Physics.

Coals may be hot, but they’re terrible at transferring heat. They have a “low thermal capacity.” That is, it takes them relatively long time to bake a walker. (It’s like sticking your hand in an oven set to 400°F. The air feels hot, but it won’t burn you instantly.) As long as they keep moving, each step will absorb very little heat from the embers.

The Most Popular Tourist Attractions in Each State

Hot air balloons drifting over the Rio Grande River in Albuquerque, New Mexico.
Hot air balloons drifting over the Rio Grande River in Albuquerque, New Mexico.
Greg Meland/iStock via Getty Images

In 2018, Americans took about 1.8 billion trips for leisure purposes alone, the U.S. Travel Association reports. But what types of attractions do they visit during those trips? Thanks to new data from Groupon and Viator, a TripAdvisor company, we now have the answer.

Map of the Northeast of the United States, showing a few of the most popular tourist attractions in that region
Groupon

Groupon mapped out each state’s most popular travel experience and classified them according to price, type, and region. Tourists in the northeast United States tend to gravitate toward what Groupon describes as “exploration and discovery” activities, like the Founding Fathers Tour of Philadelphia, Maine's Portland City and Lighthouse Tour, and the day trip from Boston to Martha’s Vineyard.

Map of the Midwest region of the United States, listing a few of the most popular tourist attractions in those states
Groupon

The Midwest is by far the cheapest place to vacation, with the cost of attractions in the region averaging about $48. Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, and North Dakota are great states to visit if you’re looking for a top-ranked food tour, while South Dakota, Iowa, Nebraska, and Illinois offer plenty of educational tours and experiences (including a movie site tour for Field of Dreams fans).

Map of the Southern region of the United States, listing some of the most popular tourist attractions in that area
Groupon

Experiences in the South are fairly varied. Visitors have plenty of options, whether they’re looking for a historic tour of Asheville, North Carolina's Biltmore Estate (the largest privately owned house in the United States) or a day of thrills at Virginia’s Busch Gardens amusement park. Tourists in the South do seem to prefer watery activities, though—the region is popular for dinner cruises and dolphin watching.

Map of the Western region of the United States, listing some of the most popular tourist destinations in the area
Groupon

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the West is easily the most expensive region for visitors, averaging about $176 per attraction. Tourists in this region tend to gravitate toward experiences like helicopter tours and hot air balloon rides, all of which push the region toward the pricey end of the scale. Still, if you’re looking for astounding natural beauty, there are few places with more variety than the American West.

Driving This Thanksgiving Holiday? Here’s the Worst Time to Leave, According to Google Maps

Marcos Assis/iStock via Getty Images
Marcos Assis/iStock via Getty Images

For many people, cooking the turkey correctly or dodging political arguments with family members aren't the most stressful parts of Thanksgiving. It's having to share the road with millions of other travelers on the way to Thanksgiving dinner. If you're hoping to make this element of the holiday a little more tolerable in 2019, plan your day with data from Google Maps.

As Travel + Leisure reports, Google Maps recently published a roundup of Thanksgiving travel tips, including the absolute worst times to hit the road. You may think that leaving the day before Thanksgiving will give you a head-start on traffic, but according to Google, Wednesday is the busiest travel day of the week. Congestion peaks between 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. on Wednesday in many parts of the country. If you have no choice but to travel on November 27, plan to leave earlier in the day before roads get too crowded.

It pays to leave the house early the day of the actual holiday. Around 6 a.m., roads will be clear in most major cities, with traffic gradually increasing throughout the morning and peaking as early as noon.

As people who regularly travel for Turkey Day know, getting to dinner on time is only half the headache. Traffic can be just as brutal on the way home. To make the journey as painless as possible, plan to leave first thing in the morning—ideally on Sunday, when most travelers have completed the trip.

Traveling for Thanksgiving is rarely as simple as driving to and from dinner. If you plan on making pit stops along the way, Google has travel information for that as well. According to Google search trends, "ham shops" are busiest at noon the day before Thanksgiving, and outlet malls reach peak traffic around noon on Black Friday. Here are some more stress-free travel tips for the holiday season.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

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