This Augmented Reality Flashlight Changes How You Interact With the World

Arvind Sanjeev
Arvind Sanjeev

Compared to sleek smartphones and augmented reality goggles, a flashlight looks pretty low-tech. But what if you used that familiar design as a vehicle for some of today’s most exciting technology? That’s what Arvind Sanjeev accomplished with Lumen. As Co.Design reports, the masters student at the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design has reimagined the handheld flashlight as a platform for augmented reality.

What sets Lumen apart from other AR products, like Microsoft’s HoloLens or even the apps on your iPhone, is the straightforward design. Most people know how to use a flashlight: Pick it up by the handle, click it on, and point the light at whatever you wish to see. Lumen operates on a similar principle, but instead of illuminating objects with light alone, it projects relevant information onto them that enhances the way users experience reality.

Using a built-in camera and a special algorithm, the flashlight can identify the objects in its path. Direct it at a stereo and it will project its own interface with dials you can actually use; point it at the ground and it can show an arrow leading you to your destination like a maps app. Developers can work with the interface to program their own responses to appear when Lumen lands on a certain item.

Lumen is also capable of impressive visuals tricks. It features a depth sensor that enables it to wrap pixels around 3D objects in a convincing way. Bring the light to a museum and it can change what you’re looking at by superimposing moving faces over portraits and statues. (Just try not to annoy your fellow museumgoers.)

Sanjeev claims that Lumen is unique in the mixed reality market: All other devices either rely on screens and headsets or they can’t be easily transported. “Lumen challenges this trend and explores how people can feel immersed in their natural space by merging bits with atoms,” he wrote on his website. By ditching the wearable hardware, Sanjeev believes he has created a more organic augmented reality experience.

For an idea of how Lumen works in the real world, you can watch the video below.

[h/t Co.Design]

Apple Reportedly Won't Let Movie Bad Guys Use iPhones

Jamie Lee Curtis, Don Johnson, Toni Collette, Christopher Plummer, K Callan, Chris Evans, Michael Shannon, Riki Lindhome, Ana de Armas, Jaeden Martell, and Katherine Langford in Rian Johnson's Knives Out (2019).
Jamie Lee Curtis, Don Johnson, Toni Collette, Christopher Plummer, K Callan, Chris Evans, Michael Shannon, Riki Lindhome, Ana de Armas, Jaeden Martell, and Katherine Langford in Rian Johnson's Knives Out (2019).
Claire Folger © 2018 MRC II Distribution Company L.P. All rights reserved.

Like any good whodunit, Knives Out (2019) is filled with twists that keep viewers guessing who the true villain is throughout the film. But there's a major clue as to who the good guys and bad guys are hidden in plain sight. To spot it, just look at what type of smartphone the characters are holding.

As Knives Out writer and director Rian Johnson revealed in a recent video for Vanity Fair, Apple won't let an iPhone appear on film if it belongs to a villain. "I don't know if I should say this or not," Johnson said. "Apple, they let you use iPhones in movies[...]but bad guys cannot have iPhones on camera[...]Every single filmmaker who has a bad guy in their movie that's supposed to be a secret wants to murder me right now." You can listen to the tidbit at the 2:50-minute mark in the video below.

Apple has long used product placement in movies and television shows to promote its brand. There's even reportedly an employee at Apple whose job it is to work with Hollywood to get MacBooks and iPhones into the hands of characters on screen. The ubiquity of Apple gadgets in media means the lack of one could be a legitimate spoiler in a murder mystery. Apple has also been tight-lipped about its product placement rules, making Johnson's revelation an especially juicy insight.

If you're looking for more film secrets, check out these hidden messages in the backgrounds of your favorite movies and TV shows.

[h/t The Next Web]

10 Simple Tricks for Charging Your Smartphone Faster

Makidotvn, iStock via Getty Images
Makidotvn, iStock via Getty Images

Smartphones always seem to reach low power at the least convenient moments possible. If you've ever urged your device to charge faster in the minutes before a phone interview or when you're about to board a plane, you can relate. While the easiest way to avoid this scenario is to plug in your device before the battery dips into the danger zone, if you've already reached this point, there are simple ways to speed up the charging process.

Some hacks for charging a phone faster involve steps you can take in anticipation of the next time you're surviving on minimum energy. Certain gadgets, like special chargers and battery packs, will power-up your device more efficiently than others. For moments when your phone is dying and all you have is your regular charging cable, adjusting your phone's settings to minimize the power it consumes also works in a pinch.

You can find some specific ways to charge your phone quickly below: 

  1. Plug it into a wall outlet instead of a USB port.
  1. Use a portable battery pack.
  1. Buy a special "fast" phone charger.
  1. Switch to low power mode.
  1. Switch to airplane mode.
  1. Let your phone drain completely on its own once a month to the extend the battery life.
  1. Close any background apps.
  1. Stop automatic app updates.
  1. Don't check your phone while it's charging
  1. Keep your phone out of the heat.

For more tricks for making your phone usage more efficient, check out these tips for typing faster.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER