Slap Bracelet-Notepad Hybrid Is the Perfect Tool for Forgetful '90s Kids

Wemo
Wemo

If you own a fancy smart watch, you can access directions, grocery lists, and other notes you write by glancing down at your arm. But blowing a few hundred bucks on a high-tech wearable isn’t the only way to keep your notes where you can see them. As Co.Design reports, the Wemo bracelet is a notepad for your wrist, and it only costs around $11.

Wemo (short for wearable memo) should look familiar to anyone who grew up in the 1980s or '90s. The oblong-shaped, silicone band wraps around your wrist like a slap bracelet. Lines or a bullet journal-style dot grid act as the template for your notes, which you can jot down with either a marker or ballpoint pen. The writing stays clear even if you’re working in the rain or underwater. When you're ready to wipe away what you’ve written, an eraser or a few quick rubs with your finger will do the trick.

Designers working for the Japanese brand Kenma were inspired to create the product after seeing nurses write notes directly on their skin. Emergency medical technicians, police officers, and construction workers may also need to write and access notes quickly while keeping their hands free. But even if your job doesn’t require it, Wemo may be a smart option if you’ve ever found yourself writing a brilliant idea on some scrap of paper you were bound to lose when you didn’t have a notebook handy.

Bracelet standing up and wrapped.
Wemo

Bracelet on a person's wrist.
Wemo

Colorful bracelets.
Wemo

The bracelets are available to purchase in green, cream, and light blue from Amazon.

[h/t Co.Design]

The Smart Reason IKEA Mugs Come With a Chip on the Bottom

This IKEA mug has a low-key design element that might make your day a little easier.
This IKEA mug has a low-key design element that might make your day a little easier.
IKEA

IKEA might be best known for its array of ready-to-assemble furniture like beds, bookshelves, and desks, as well as the wafting scent of Swedish meatballs. But the popular household goods franchise also sells a steady number of coffee mugs. Most are unremarkable, including the spectacularly named VARDAGEN, and therefore never go out of style. But the VARDAGEN does have one odd feature. The 3.25-inch off-white stoneware mug comes with a chip on the bottom. Why?

According to Reader’s Digest, the chip has an official IKEA term: It’s called a drainage gate, and it has a very specific purpose.

The drainage gate was implemented so water wouldn’t collect on the bottom of the mug in a dishwasher. Since mugs are loaded upside-down, water has a tendency to pool on the bottom, which could conceivably result in a slightly splashy mess when unloading.

Because the “chip” is so smooth and uniform, it’s unlikely too many people mistake it for a damaged product. You can also find the drainage gate in the VARDAGEN teacup and saucer set.

[h/t Reader’s Digest]

Can You Guess the Brand Based on Just a Piece of Its Logo?

Would you be able to recognize these logos if they had been tampered with?
Would you be able to recognize these logos if they had been tampered with?
plus49/Construction Photography/Avalon/Getty Images

As any good marketing analyst will tell you, a well-designed logo can easily be the difference between an internationally recognized company and one that quickly fades into obscurity. And now, since apps aren’t disappearing anytime soon, it’s especially important for a brand to be immediately identifiable by a tiny, often wordless icon.

No matter how small, a logo can still say a lot about what it stands for. An organization that wants to promote sustainability and environmental awareness, for example, is much more likely to design a green logo than a red one. And Target’s logo, which looks like a literal target, hits the mark when it comes to helping customers remember what website they’re shopping on. Other companies, like Baskin-Robbins, are slightly more subtle—the ice cream franchise’s BR logo contains the number 31, representing how many flavors you can choose from.

While you might effortlessly recognize a Target or Baskin-Robbins logo on a highway sign or in a social media advertisement, would you be able to do the same if part of that logo was missing or distorted? That’s exactly what UK-based loan provider Transmit Startups has done to eight logos below—words have been deleted, some colors have been changed, and certain design elements have been blurred or obscured. Try your hand at identifying which brand each one belongs to, and then scroll down to reveal the answers.

Guess the Brand

1.

distorted logo
Transmit Startups

2.

distorted logo
Transmit Startups

3.

distorted logo
Transmit Startups

4.

distorted logo
Transmit Startups

5.

distorted logo
Transmit Startups

6.

distorted logo
Transmit Startups

7.

distorted logo
Transmit Startups

8.

distorted logo
Transmit Startups

Check Your Answers

1. Heinz

heinz logo
Transmit Startups

2. HSBC

hsbc logo
Transmit Startups

3. Instagram

instagram logo
Transmit Startups

4. Netflix

netflix logo
Transmit Startups

5. Tesco

tesco logo
Transmit Startups

6. Marks & Spencer

marks & spencer logo
Transmit Startups

7. Disney

disney logo
Transmit Startups

8. Amazon

amazon logo
Transmit Startups

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