How to Build a Wilderness Shelter

Thinkstock
Thinkstock

Trapped outside without a tent? Don’t worry. With a little ingenuity, you can build a shelter that will keep you safe while ensuring you have a fascinating survival tale to tell.

1. Let Nature Do the Heavy Lifting

You may get lucky and find out your work has already been done for you. Look around for handy shelters like caves, domes formed by low branches, or sheltered gaps in rock faces. If you can find one of these lodgings, you can save your energy for other survival tasks.

2. Location, Location, Location

If you’ve got to improvise, put some thought into selecting your site. The best spots will be flat, relatively close to water – but not too close, or bugs and thirsty critters will bother you – and free of hazards like dead trees or ready-to-fall boulders.

3. Frame Up

Find a long, sturdy stick that’s at least as tall as you are and lean it against a rock, stump, or limb that’s two or three feet high. Then make a series of small A-frames by leaning two sticks at a diagonal on either side of this main ridge pole. Basically, you want to make a cornucopia that only you will be spilling out of.

4. Put a Bough On It

Once the frame is built, cover the exterior with boughs or evergreen limbs, leaving the mouth open so you can crawl in and out. If there’s snow on the ground, pack that around the limbs; it’s great insulation. Place a pile of leaves, needles or snow near the opening so you can seal the entrance once you’re inside your makeshift home.

5. Invest in Flooring

Sleeping on the bare ground can be cold and wet, so brighten things up and conserve energy by spreading the floor of your shelter with evergreen needles, dry leaves, or anything else you can find for a layer of insulation.

6. Thank You for Not Smoking

Even if gets really chilly or dark in your shelter, resist the urge to build a fire or spark your gas lantern. Both are recipes for carbon monoxide poisoning. Instead, build a fire outside the shelter, use it to heat up rocks, then move the rocks into your shelter to keep things toasty.
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Can You Spot the Easter Egg Hiding in the Flowers in This Springtime Brain Teaser?

Don't worry—the puzzle below won't trigger your seasonal allergies.
Don't worry—the puzzle below won't trigger your seasonal allergies.
FlairImages/iStock via Getty Images

Scores of residents likely won’t be dashing through vibrant flower gardens at your neighborhood’s traditional Easter egg hunt this year, but you can still put your eagle eye to good use in this brain teaser, courtesy of online blinds retailer 247 Blinds.

In the following image, a single egg is hidden somewhere among the bright pattern of yellow flowers and green leaves. Once you’ve spotted it (or decided to throw in the towel), scroll down to reveal the answer.

spot the egg in the flowers brain teaser
Can you spot the Easter egg?
247 Blinds

The design in the image is the very same one as the online retailer's “Hard to Crack” roller blinds—cleverly concealed egg included—which you can customize to fit most standard windows. Not only will it give your room a sunny, springtime ambience, it’ll also give your house guests something to do while they sip their morning coffee.

Ready to wrap up your virtual Easter egg hunt? The egg is circled in red below.

spot the egg in the flowers brain teaser answer
You've earned a chocolate bunny or two.
247 Blinds

And while you’re waiting for the Easter Bunny to deliver a basket brimming with candy-filled eggs this weekend, find out where the Easter Bunny came from here.

Need to Cure of Case of Cabin Fever? Try Backyard Birding

Baltimore orioles are colorful spring migrants.
Baltimore orioles are colorful spring migrants.
Brittany Tande/iStock via Getty Images

No matter how many virtual tours and online classes you take, it's hard not to go a little stir-crazy after weeks of social distancing. If you're already sick of activities that require you to stare at a screen, consider seeking out real-life entertainment in your backyard. As Auburn Pub reports, the New York State Department of Environment Conservation is recommending that residents take up birdwatching during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, they stress that it's important to continue to practice social distancing.

Zoos, beaches, and even some national parks are currently closed to the public, but you don't have to travel far to get your daily dose of nature. Spring is in full bloom, and many bird species are currently in the midst of migrating from their winter homes down south to northern states. That means that even urban areas like New York City are becoming places for birds to nest and raise their young.

Local parks are great spots to observe birds while keeping your distance from others, but a trip off your property isn't necessary. If you have a backyard, or even just a tree on the street outside your home, you can watch birds from a patio, balcony, or through a window.

Birding is more than just a way to pass the time when activities are limited. A 2017 study from the University of Exeter found that being able to see birds around your home may reduce levels of stress, depression, and anxiety. If you use birding as an excuse to get out of the house, those benefits may be even greater as being outdoors in general has been shown to boost several facets of mental health.

If you're interested in using your time in isolation to get into birding, there are many resources online you can use. Watch this beginner's guide to birding and read these facts about the birds in your backyard before you get started.

[h/t Auburn Pub]

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