The Self-Deploying Flood Barrier That Could Keep Cities Dry Without Sandbags

MegaSecur, YouTube
MegaSecur, YouTube

For many places in the world, the future is going to be wet. Climate change is already intensifying heavy rains and flooding in parts of the U.S., and it’s only expected to get worse. A recent study estimated that by 2050, more than 60 million people in the U.S. would be vulnerable to 100-year floods.

Some cities plan to meet rising waters with protective parkland, while some architects are developing floating houses. And one company has figured out how to replace piles of sandbags as emergency flood control, as Business Insider reports. Water-Gate, a line of flood protection products made by a Canadian company called MegaSecur, is a self-deploying water barrier that can be used to stop overflowing water in its tracks.

The emergency dam is made of folded canvas that, when water rushes into it, inflates up to become a kind of pocket for the water to get trapped in. You can roll it out across a street, a canal, or a creek like a giant hose, then wait for the water to arrive. In the event of a flash flood, you can even deploy it while the flood is already in progress. It can stop waters that rise up to five feet.

According to MegaSecur, one Water-Gate dam can replace thousands of sandbags, and once the floodwaters have receded, you can fold it back up and use it again. Sadly, based on the flood projections of climate change scientists, heavy flooding will soon become more and more common, and that will make reusable flood barriers necessary, saving time and money that would otherwise be spent buying, stacking, and getting rid of sandbags. The auto-deployment also means that it can be used by a single person, rather than a team of laborers. It could just as easily be set up outside a house by a homeowner as it could be set up on a city street by an emergency worker.

As climate change-related proposals go, it sounds a little more feasible than a floating house.

[h/t Business Insider]

This Innovative Cutting Board Takes the Mess Out of Meal Prep

There's no way any of these ingredients will end up on the floor.
There's no way any of these ingredients will end up on the floor.
TidyBoard, Kickstarter

Transferring food from the cutting board to the bowl—or scraps to the compost bin—can get a little messy, especially if you’re dealing with something that has a tendency to roll off the board, spill juice everywhere, or both (looking at you, cherry tomatoes).

The TidyBoard, available on Kickstarter, is a cutting board with attached containers that you can sweep your ingredients right into, taking the mess out of meal prep and saving you some counter space in the process. The board itself is 15 inches by 20 inches, and the container that fits in its empty slot is 14 inches long, 5.75 inches wide, and more than 4 inches deep. Two smaller containers fit inside the large one, making it easy to separate your ingredients.

Though the 4-pound board hangs off the edge of your counter, good old-fashioned physics will keep it from tipping off—as long as whatever you’re piling into the containers doesn’t exceed 9 pounds. It also comes with a second set of containers that work as strainers, so you can position the TidyBoard over the edge of your sink and drain excess water or juice from your ingredients as you go.

You can store food in the smaller containers, which have matching lids; and since they’re all made of BPA-free silicone, feel free to pop them in the microwave. (Remove the small stopper on top of the lid first for a built-in steaming hole.)

tidyboard storage containers
They also come in gray, if teal isn't your thing.
TidyBoard

Not only does the bamboo-made TidyBoard repel bacteria, it also won’t dull your knives or let strong odors seep into it. In short, it’s an opportunity to make cutting, cleaning, storing, and eating all easier, neater, and more efficient. Prices start at $79, and it’s expected to ship by October 2020—you can find out more details and order yours on Kickstarter.

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Key West Has Installed Permanent Rainbow Crosswalks

In Key West, rainbow crosswalks aren't just for Pride Month.
In Key West, rainbow crosswalks aren't just for Pride Month.
Maxvis/iStock via Getty Images

In 2015, Key West became the first place in Florida to install permanent rainbow crosswalks—a celebration of LGBTQ+ pride that reflected the city’s “One Human Family” motto. But a few years later, the city decided to repave its historic Duval Street, which required tearing up the four colorful paths at the intersection of Petronia Street.

The rainbow crosswalks finally returned this week—just in time for Pride Month—and they’re even more vibrant than before. The old ones were essentially regular white crosswalks with each empty space filled in with a different color, whereas the new paths feature long, colored stripes with a white stripe along the top and bottom edges.

According to NBC 6 South Florida, workers positioned the thermoplastic stripes on the street and attached them to the pavement below with heat from propane torches. Key West mayor Teri Johnson and other officials then commemorated the new landmarks, located in the heart of the city's entertainment district, with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. (The ribbon was also rainbow colored, and all participants wore masks to prevent the spread of coronavirus.)

“The rainbow crosswalks mean that everybody is welcome, everybody is equal, everybody is recognized, and that we do really abide by the ‘One Human Family’ spirit,” Johnson said.

Key West isn’t the only place with permanent rainbow paths; as LGBTQ Nation reports, you can find them in San Francisco, West Hollywood, Seattle, Philadelphia, Toronto, and other cities, too. And while the small island city has postponed its Pride events until November due to the pandemic, some of the world's biggest Pride parades and festivals are simply moving the party online: Here are 10 events to check out this month.

[h/t NBC 6 South Florida]