15 Wonderful Words for Delightful Experiences

ThinkStock/Erin McCarthy
ThinkStock/Erin McCarthy

Some situations are just too perfect for words, but these bits of lovely lingo will shorten that list ever so slightly.

1. Petrichor

The scent of rain on dry ground. The word was coined in the 1960s by mineralogists studying the chemical composition of that scent. Petr- is the Greek root for stone, and ichor was the word for the blood-like substance in the veins of the Greek gods. So petrichor would be the divine essence of stone. Breathe it in!

2. Eyesome

Easy on the eyes. Attractive. Said of maidens and majestic views.

3. Toothsome

Delicious. There’s nothing better than a meal that is both toothsome and eyesome.

4. Jucundity

Merry enjoyment, delight. Also commonly spelled “jocundity,” but those repeated u’s are so merry and delightful. 

5. Salubrious

Good for the health. Temperate, comfortable, agreeable. A popular word in old-time tourist brochures, like “Salubrious Southampton,” “Salubrious Singapore,” and “Salubrious Stonehaven: The Sunniest Resort on the Sunny Side of Scotland.” 

6. Voluptuate

To take luxurious pleasure in something. Voluptuate in this list of salubrious words. 

7. Dulciloquent

Having a gentle, sweet way of speaking. From the Latin dulcis, for sweet. If it’s true what they say about catching more flies with honey than with vinegar, dulciloquence will get you far.

8. Snuggery

A cozy little room—exactly the place you want to be in cold weather!

9. Suaviloquence

Soothing, agreeable speech. Ahhh.

10. Euphony

The quality of sounding good or pleasing to the ear. Usually used for words or sentences. Dulciloquent, suaviloquent, euphony might be too much good sounding stuff for anyone to bear. 

11. Viscerotonic

Having a comfort-loving, easygoing, social personality. Coined in the 1950s by a psychologist attempting to correlate body type with personality type. People who were viscerotonic, from “viscera” or internal organs, supposedly had over-developed digestive systems. All the better to voluptuate in a toothsome meal. 

12. Adlubescence

Pleasure, enjoyment. From the Latin allubescere, to gratify. Using this word should bring great adlubescence to those who hear it.

13. Oblectament

A source of delight. In Latin, oblectamentum, plural oblectamenta. It’s important to have some oblectamenta in your life.

14. Pulchritudinous

Beautiful. From the Latin for beauty. Many have complained that the related noun pulchritude (beauty) is, ironically, an ugly word. But pulchritudinous is positively euphonious

15. Philocalist

A lover of beautiful things. If you are a philocalist, you must love all these pulchritudinous words.

What's the Difference Between Stuffing and Dressing?

iStock
iStock

For carbohydrate lovers, nothing completes a Thanksgiving meal quite like stuffing—shovelfuls of bread, celery, mushrooms, and other ingredients that complement all of that turkey protein.

Some people don’t say stuffing, though. They say dressing. In these calamitous times, knowing how to properly refer to the giant glob of insulin-spiking bread seems necessary. So what's the difference?

Let’s dismiss one theory off the bat: Dressing and stuffing do not correlate with how the side dish is prepared. A turkey can be stuffed with dressing, and stuffing can be served in a casserole dish. Whether it’s ever seen the inside of a bird is irrelevant, and anyone who tells you otherwise is wrong and should be met with suspicion, if not outright derision.

The terms are actually separated due to regional dialects. Dressing seems to be the favored descriptor for southern states like Mississippi, Tennessee, South Carolina, and Georgia, while stuffing is preferred by Maine, New York, and other northern areas. (Some parts of Pennsylvania call it filling, which is a bit too on the nose, but to each their own.)

If stuffing stemmed from the common practice of filling a turkey with carbs, why the division? According to HuffPost, it may have been because Southerners considered the word stuffing impolite, and therefore never embraced it.

While you should experience no material difference in asking for stuffing or dressing, when visiting relatives it might be helpful to keep to their regionally-preferred word to avoid confusion. Enjoy stuffing yourselves.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

Uitwaaien, or Outblowing, Is the Dutch Cure for the Winter Blues

sergio_kumer/iStock via Getty Images
sergio_kumer/iStock via Getty Images

Hygge, a Danish philosophy that's recently caught on in the U.S., is all about feeling cozy and relaxed indoors when the weather is cold outside. Uitwaaien takes the opposite approach to winter. Dutch for "outblowing," uitwaaien involves doing physical activity, like going for a brisk jog, in chilly, windy weather. It may lack the warmth and fuzziness of hygge, but many Dutch people swear by its energizing effects.

The practice known as uitwaaien has roots in the Netherlands going back at least a century, Nautilus reports. The name comes from the concept of replacing "bad air" with "good air." While there may not be a lot of science to support that idea, exercise does have scientifically proven benefits, such as boosting energy and lowering stress. And while spending 30 minutes on a treadmill in a stuffy gym can leave you feeling sweaty and gross, running outside in the wind can be refreshing and exhilarating.

There's another benefit of uitwaaien: It's an excuse to get outside during a time of year when you'd normally be cooped up indoors. Research shows that being out in nature can enhance our creativity, sharpen our focus, and help us feel more relaxed. And if temperatures are too low for your comfort, a few minutes of cardio is the best way to warm up quickly.

Still need motivation to exercise in the cold? Think of it this way: Every minute of uitwaaien you take part in will make your hygge time that much sweeter. Here are some ways to practice hygge in your home this season.

[h/t Nautilus]

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