AI May Be Better at Identifying Skin Cancer Than Human Doctors

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iStock

Screening for skin cancer is an imperfect science, but an international team of scientists believes AI can help boost the test's accuracy. As they report in a study published in the Annals of Oncology, a machine-learning program known as a deep learning convolutional neural network (CNN) can be trained to recognize skin cancer with a greater success rate than professional dermatologists.

Researchers taught the CNN to identify skin cancer by showing it more than 100,000 images of malignant melanomas and benign moles. "The CNN works like the brain of a child," co-author Holger Haenssle, senior managing physician at the University of Heidelberg, said in a statement. That means the more information it's given about a certain task, the more it can learn and fine-tune its performance.

After training the AI with a database of images, the researchers showed it a different set of images it had never seen before. The CNN correctly diagnosed skin cancer from images alone 95 percent of the time. When 58 dermatologists were given the same task, the were able to catch only 86.6 percent of the malignant melanomas. The CNN was also less likely to misdiagnose a benign mole as cancerous.

The results don't necessarily mean that AI robots will be replacing flesh-and-blood doctors (or even pigeons) for cancer screenings in the near future. Rather, the researchers see the program acting as a supplement to dermatologists in the clinic, perhaps by evaluating images already stored in the doctors' databases and generating "expert opinions" on the likelihood of cancer.

Even as a doctor's aid, the CNN in its current state leaves room for improvement: The images it looked at were mostly of white patients that didn't include the full range of skin lesions. Diagnosing melanomas that show up on fingers, toes, and scalps also presents a challenge when working with an image-based system. Nonetheless, the researchers are confident that these issues won't stop AI from playing a role in future cancer screenings. "Given exponential development of imaging technology, we envisage that sooner than later, automated diagnosis will change the diagnostic paradigm in dermatology," researchers said. 

In the 1800s, Drinking Too Much Tea Could Get a Woman Sent to an Insane Asylum

The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Images
The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Images

If you were a woman in the 19th century, virtually anything could get you committed to an insane asylum—including drinking too much tea.

NHS Grampian Archives, which covers the region around Scotland’s Grampian mountains, dug up an admissions record from the Aberdeen Lunatic Asylum while looking into the institution’s annual reports from the 1840s. The table contains data on causes of admissions categorized by sex. In addition to those admitted to the asylum for “prolonged nursing,” “poverty,” or “disappointment in love” (one man and one woman admitted for that one!), one woman arrived at the asylum only to have her issues blamed on “sedentary life—abuse of tea.”

Intrigued by the diagnosis, someone at the archives tracked down more details on the patient and posted the case notes on Facebook. Naturally, her condition involved more than just a little too much Earl Grey. Elizabeth Collie, a 34-year-old factory worker, was admitted in November 1848 after suffering from delusions, specifically delusions about machines.

Her files state that “she imagines that some species of machinery has been employed by her neighbors in the house she has been living in, which had the effect of causing pain and disorder in her head, bowels, and other parts of the body.”

Asylum employees noted that ”no cause [for her condition] can be assigned, except perhaps the excessive use of tea, to which she has always been much addicted.” She was released in June 1849.

A letter to the editors of The British Medical Journal in 1886 suggests that the suspicion of women’s tea-drinking habits was not unique to Aberdeen mental health institutions. One doctor, J. Muir Howie—who once served as a regional president for the Royal Medical Society of Edinburgh, so we can assume he was relatively respectable—wrote to the publication:

Would you kindly allow me to draw attention to the fact that, among women at least, the abuse of tea frequently leads to the abuse of alcohol! My experience in connection with a home for inebriate women has led me to this conclusion. Many of the inmates, indeed, almost all of them, were enormous tea-drinkers before they became victims to alcoholic dipsomania. During their indulgence in alcohol, they rarely drink much tea; but, as soon as the former cut off, they return to the latter. In many instances, alcohol was first used to relieve the nervous symptoms produced by excessive tea drinking.

Ah, women. So susceptible to mania and vice. It's a miracle any of us stay out of the madhouse.

Crocs Is Donating More Than 100,000 Pairs of Shoes to Healthcare Workers

Sturdy, comfortable Crocs are a favorite among healthcare professionals.
Sturdy, comfortable Crocs are a favorite among healthcare professionals.
David Silverman/Getty Images

Crocs have long been a favorite among healthcare workers who spend hours on their feet each day—and now, they can get a pair for free.

This week, the company announced that it will give away more than 100,000 pairs of shoes to medical professionals fighting the new coronavirus in the U.S. ClickOrlando reports that workers can submit their requests for Crocs Classic Clogs or Crocs at Work via an online form on the Crocs website, which will open each weekday at 12 p.m. EST and continue accepting orders until it fulfills its daily allotment.

According to a press release, that allotment is a whopping 10,000 pairs of shoes per day. The as-yet-unspecified end date for the program—called “A Free Pair for Healthcare”—depends on inventory levels and the number of requests the company receives. In addition to shipping shoes to individuals, Crocs is also planning to donate up to 100,000 more pairs directly to healthcare organizations. So far, they’ll send shoes to the Dayton Area Hospital Association in Ohio, St. Anthony North Health Campus in Denver, Colorado, the Atlantic Health System in New Jersey, and more.

“These workers have our deepest respect, and we are humbled to be able to answer their call and provide whatever we can to help during this unprecedented time,” Crocs president and CEO Andrew Rees said in the release. “Share the word to all those in healthcare and please be mindful to allow those who need these most to place their requests. This is the least we can do for those working incredibly hard to defeat this virus.”

Healthcare professionals can request their free Crocs here.

[h/t ClickOrlando]

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