When Kids Took a Bite from PBS's Newton's Apple

PBS
PBS

For the past half-century, PBS programs have provided rudimentary, but crucial, lessons about grammar and storytelling for their pint-sized viewers. If Sesame Street taught kids the alphabet, Reading Rainbow got them thinking in complete sentences.

Eventually, kids graduated to middle school and started to expand their curiosity. From 1983 to 1998, another PBS program titled Newton’s Apple was able to satisfy it.

The half-hour series anticipated a lot of question-and-answer formats that are still popular today, including Mental Floss’s own Big Questions installments. Each week, host Ira Flatow would select a query sent in by a viewer or provided by a member of the studio audience: What is fiber optics? How much of the body is fat? What makes our ears pop? Why do peeled onions make us cry? In live-to-tape or pre-recorded segments, Flatow would delve into the topic, offering demonstrations and expert opinions that illustrated the show’s explanations.

Flatow, a former science reporter for NPR, drew comparisons to comedian Groucho Marx and often displayed a participatory bent, swimming with dolphins or gliding up in a hot air balloon. Celebrities would also make the rounds: Betty White once helped explain why cats purr. If there was a question or concept that ever puzzled a kid, Newton’s Apple had probably offered up an explanation.

“Despite the fact that we try to make science interesting and amusing, I do not intend to allow Newton's Apple to become the That's Incredible of PBS,” Flatow said in 1983, referring to the NBC info-tainment show. “My role as a kind of gatekeeper is to make sure that every show makes good, sound, scientific points. It may be fun, but it'll be the truth.”

Questions were often selected based on how often they recurred in viewer mail and whether the resulting demonstration would make for compelling television. Kids asked a lot of questions about dinosaurs, while adults were more curious about health and medicine. (The most popular question: Why is the sky blue?) Roughly half of the questions came from viewers; the other half were generated by staffers.

Flatow left the series in 1987 and was replaced by David Heil, the associate director of the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, following a national talent search. He made his debut by jumping out of an airplane without a parachute. (Fortunately, it was a tandem jump.)

Produced by KTCA, PBS's Minneapolis affiliate, Newton's Apple was supported by the DuPont corporation for most of its run. When that relationship ended in 1990, the show was effectively canceled, only to be revived for another eight seasons when the 3M company agreed to subsidize some of the production costs.

While the show was used as a teaching aid in up to 10 percent of all middle school classrooms in America (PBS issued information packets to be paired with the broadcasts), the secret of its 16 years on the air was that it was watched primarily by older viewers.

In 1992, the Los Angeles Times reported that 80 percent of the show’s audience was 18 years of age or older. The reason, producers said, was that a lot of people stopped being invested in science as part of their school curriculum in junior high and didn't know where else to turn to for answers to the burning questions they had (this was pre-Google, after all). For its role as a remedial learning tool, Newton’s Apple won a Daytime Emmy in 1989 for Outstanding Children’s Series. Unfortunately, there was no category for Outstanding Children's Series Viewed Mostly by Adults.

The ChopBox Smart Cutting Board Has a Food Scale, Timer, and Knife Sharper Built Right Into It

ChopBox
ChopBox

When it comes to furnishing your kitchen with all of the appliances necessary to cook night in and night out, you’ll probably find yourself running out of counter space in a hurry. The ChopBox, which is available on Indiegogo and dubs itself “The World’s First Smart Cutting Board,” looks to fix that by cramming a bunch of kitchen necessities right into one cutting board.

In addition to giving you a knife-resistant bamboo surface to slice and dice on, the ChopBox features a built-in digital scale that weighs up to 6.6 pounds of food, a nine-hour kitchen timer, and two knife sharpeners. It also sports a groove on its surface to catch any liquid runoff that may be produced by the food and has a second pull-out cutting board that doubles as a serving tray.

There’s a 254nm UVC light featured on the board, which the company says “is guaranteed to kill 99.99% of germs and bacteria" after a minute of exposure. If you’re more of a traditionalist when it comes to cleanliness, the ChopBox is completely waterproof (but not dishwasher-safe) so you can wash and scrub to your heart’s content without worry. 

According to the company, a single one-hour charge will give you 30 days of battery life, and can be recharged through a Micro USB port.

The ChopBox reached its $10,000 crowdfunding goal just 10 minutes after launching its campaign, but you can still contribute at different tiers. Once it’s officially released, the ChopBox will retail for $200, but you can get one for $100 if you pledge now. You can purchase the ChopBox on Indiegogo here.

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The Fur Trade: How the Care Bears Conquered the '80s

Care Bears were one of the great merchandising success stories of the 1980s.
Care Bears were one of the great merchandising success stories of the 1980s.
Kristy Sparrow, Getty Images

How do you patent a teddy bear? That was the question facing executives at American Greetings, the popular greeting card company, and toy kingpin Kenner in the early 1980s. American Greetings was coming off the success of Strawberry Shortcake, an apple-cheeked sensation that adorned cards and hundreds of licensed products. Kenner was the force behind the Star Wars action figure line, which rolled out in the late 1970s and went on to become one of the biggest success stories in the history of the toy industry.

Now the two companies wanted to collaborate on a line of teddy bears. For Kenner, it was an opportunity to break into the lucrative plush toy market. For American Greetings, having a stuffed, furry iteration of a greeting card—complete with a name, a unique color, and an emotional message—was the goal. The solution? Put greeting card-esque designs on the bears's stomachs and call them Care Bears. It was a simple idea that proceeded to rake in roughly $2 billion in sales in the Care Bears's first five years alone.

 

Strawberry Shortcake was the brainchild of Those Characters From Cleveland, a creative subsidiary of American Greetings headed up by co-presidents Jack Chojnacki and Ralph Shaffer. (While on a business meeting on the West Coast, the two overheard a receptionist telling someone that “those guys from Cleveland” were there, inspiring the name.) Given a mission from Kenner to reinvent the teddy bear, a childhood staple since the turn of the 20th century, Those Characters recruited cartoonist Dave Polter and freelance artist Elena Kucharik.

Shaffer examined the rainbow, heart, and other greeting card designs submitted by Polter. He then examined the bear sketches turned in by Kucharik. They fit together like two puzzle pieces. Putting the colorful designs on the bear’s stomach gave it a quality similar to the sentimental cards American Greetings was known for.

Two Care Bears are pictured at the Boy Meets Girl x Care Bears Collection at Colette in Paris, France in February 2017
Care Bears symbolize friendship—and billions of dollars in revenue.
Kristy Sparrow, Getty Images

Those Characters continued to refine the look of the bears, compressing their frame and giving them a little extra volume to make them more squeezable, and a heart-shaped button on their rear ends identified them as Care Bears. American Greetings was able to secure a patent based on the graphic design of their bellies. Their two-dimensional look was fleshed out by Sue Trentel, a plush designer who was able to craft a teddy that resembled the drawings.

The creative team eventually settled on a lineup of 10 bears, each one a different color and reflecting a different emotional dimension. There was Bedtime Bear, Birthday Bear, Cheer Bear, Friend Bear, Funshine Bear, Good Luck Bear, Love-a-Lot Bear, Tenderheart Bear, and Wish Bear, along with one anomaly. To balance out the potential overdose of saccharine feelings, Grumpy Bear was added. In the narrative devised by Those Characters, the Care Bears lived in a giant castle and went out on missions of caring.

While Kenner was leading the charge in terms of marketing, American Greetings knew they had a premise with broad appeal. Before any Care Bears made it to shelves, the company secured 26 licensees to manufacture everything from clothing to bedsheets to coloring books. Retailers who may have been reluctant to devote store space to a new line of teddy bears were impressed by the support, leading chains like Walmart, Kmart, and Target to quickly sign on.

 

To complement the launch of the Care Bears at the 1983 Toy Fair in New York City, Kenner president Bernie Loomis mounted a major Broadway-style stage production at a cost of roughly $1 million. During the show, Strawberry Shortcake made an appearance to introduce the next great merchandising craze.

The bears went on sale that March and quickly sold out. Desperate for more product, Kenner promised a factory owner in Taiwan a new Mercedes if he could make 1 million more Care Bears—and quickly. (Kenner got their bears, and the factory owner got his car.) American Greetings had a 16-foot stretch of Care Bears cards lining the greeting card aisles. An animated series was a hit. The Care Bears Movie followed in 1985. By 1988, more than 40 million Care Bears had been sold. By 2007, the number was 110 million. The teddy bear had successfully been reinvented.

Several Care Bears are pictured on a table at the Boy Meets Girl x Care Bears Collection at Colette in Paris, France in February 2017
Care Bears have endured for nearly 40 years.
Kristy Sparrow, Getty Images

The Care Bears have been reintroduced several times, including in 2002, 2007, and 2013. American Greetings is still marketing the Care Bears under their Cloudco Entertainment brand. A new animated series, Care Bears: Unlock the Magic, began airing on Boomerang in 2019, while apparel and other licensing—like Care Bears Funko Pops! and Care Bears clothing for Mattel’s Barbie—is still going strong.

Why the enduring appeal? In 2007, Polter credited the secularized version of values that are often instilled in churches. The Care Bears were on a mission of sharing, loving, and caring—a greeting card message that never had to leave your side.