A New Jersey Real Estate Sign Lost in Hurricane Sandy Just Washed Ashore in France

iStock
iStock

In 2012, during the destruction of Hurricane Sandy, a New Jersey real estate sign went missing. The sign was torn from its post in front of a waterfront home in Brielle and washed away to an unknown location. Now, almost six years later, it has shown up—in France.

According to The New York Times, the sign from Diane Turton, Realtors, a Jersey Shore real estate firm, washed ashore on a French beach near Bordeaux. Hannes Frank was walking along Plage du Pin Sec when he spotted the sign, a little worse for wear but still legible. He emailed the realtors about his find and included pictures of the broken sign in the sand.

The plastic sign traveled approximately 3595 miles during its years-long journey. An oceanographer suggested to The New York Times that it could have crossed the Atlantic Ocean multiple times before Frank found it, estimating that it would take about a year and a half for an object to drift from New Jersey to France. A floating real-estate sign could travel about seven miles per day, expert Curtis Ebbesmeyer told the newspaper.

Due to ocean currents, odd objects wash up on beaches all the time from far-flung coasts. Besides your average message-in-a-bottle finds, beachcombers regularly discover possessions washed away in tsunamis and goods that have fallen off cargo ships or been lost in shipwrecks. For instance, in 1992, a cargo ship accidentally spilled 28,000 rubber ducks into the North Pacific; they floated thousands of miles over the course of more than a decade, ending up as far away as Europe. LEGO toys that fell overboard from a container ship during a storm in 1997 are still washing up on English beaches today. Figuring out where these toys and drifting objects end up can help scientists study ocean currents and drift patterns.

But for the most part, the original owners rarely get photo updates about where their lost goods end up.

[h/t The New York Times]

Take a Virtual Tour of Space Mountain and Other Famous Disney World and Disneyland Rides

cholprapha/iStock via Getty Images
cholprapha/iStock via Getty Images

Disneyland in California and Walt Disney World in Florida closed in mid-March due to the COVID-19 crisis, and it's unclear when the parks will reopen. Spending time in a crowded place with thousands of strangers from around the world is the last thing you should want to do right now, but if you're craving some Disney magic at home, there's a way to experience the rides while social distancing.

As Travel + Leisure reports, most major rides at Disneyland and other Disney parks are available online as virtual tours. That includes classics like Space Mountain, Pirates of the Caribbean, and It's a Small World, as well as newer rides like Frozen Ever After and Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance.

Even though the virtual ride-throughs aren't official Disney productions, many of them document the ride experience in impressively high quality. This recording of Mickey & Minnie's Runaway Railway at Walt Disney World's Hollywood Studios in Orlando was filmed with a 360-degree camera.

You can also use YouTube to explore exclusive attractions at Disney parks outside the U.S. The video below shows a ride-through of Mystic Manor, Hong Kong Disneyland's version of The Haunted Mansion, in 4K resolution.

Transporting yourself to Disney for 10 minutes at a time is a great way to escape while you're quarantined at home. For more ways to combat boredom, check out these online classes and activities, as well as other virtual tours you can take from the comfort of your couch.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

7 Historic European Castles Virtually Rebuilt Before Your Very Eyes

A reconstruction of Spiš Castle in eastern Slovakia.
A reconstruction of Spiš Castle in eastern Slovakia.
Budget Direct

While some centuries-old castles are still standing tall, others haven’t withstood the ravages of time, war, or natural disaster quite as well. To give you an idea of what once was, Australia-based insurance company Budget Direct has digitally reconstructed seven of them for its blog, Simply Savvy.

Watch below as ruins across Europe transform back into the formidable forts and turreted castles they used to be, courtesy of a little modern-day magic we call GIF technology.

1. Samobor Castle // Samobor, Croatia

samobor castle
Samobor Castle in Samobor, Croatia
Budget Direct

The only remaining piece of the 13th-century castle built by Bohemia’s King Ottokar II is the base of the guard tower—the rest of the ruins are from an expansion that happened about 300 years later. It’s just a 10-minute walk from the Croatian city of Samobor, which bought the property in 1902.

2. Château Gaillard // Les Andelys, France

Château Gaillard in Les Andelys, France
Château Gaillard in Les Andelys, France
Budget Direct

King Richard I of England built Château Gaillard in just two years during the late 12th century as a fortress to protect the Duchy of Normandy, which belonged to England at the time, from French invasion. It didn’t last very long—France’s King Philip II captured it six years later.

3. Dunnottar Castle // Stonehaven, Scotland

Dunnottar Castle in Stonehaven, Scotland
Dunnottar Castle in Stonehaven, Scotland
Budget Direct

Dunnottar Castle overlooks the North Sea and is perhaps best known as the fortress that William Wallace (portrayed by Mel Gibson in 1995’s Braveheart) and Scottish forces won back from English occupation in 1297. Later, it became the place where the Scottish monarchy stored their crown jewels, which were smuggled to safety when Oliver Cromwell invaded during the 17th century.

4. Menlo Castle // Galway City, Ireland

Menlo Castle in Galway City, Ireland
Menlo Castle in Galway City, Ireland
Budget Direct

This ivy-covered Irish castle was built during the 16th century and all but destroyed in a fire in 1910. For those few centuries, it was home to the Blake family, English nobles who owned property all over the region.

5. Olsztyn Castle // Olsztyn, Poland

Olsztyn Castle in Olsztyn, Poland
Olsztyn Castle in Olsztyn, Poland
Budget Direct

The earliest known mention of Olsztyn Castle was in 1306, so we know it was constructed some time before then and expanded later that century by King Casimir III of Poland. It was severely damaged during wars with Sweden in the 17th and 18th centuries, but its highest tower—once a prison—still stands.

6. Spiš Castle // Spišské Podhradie, Slovakia

Spiš Castle in Spišské Podhradie, Slovakia
Spiš Castle in Spišské Podhradie, Slovakia
Budget Direct

Slovakia’s massive Spiš Castle was built in the 12th century to mark the boundary of the Hungarian kingdom and fell to ruin after a fire in 1780. However, 20th-century restoration efforts helped fortify the remaining rooms, and it was even used as a filming location for parts of 1996’s DragonHeart.

7. Poenari Castle // Valachia, Romania

Poenari Castle in Valachia, Romania
Poenari Castle in Valachia, Romania
Budget Direct

This 13th-century Romanian castle boasts one previous resident of some celebrity: Vlad the Impaler, or Vlad Dracula, who may have been an early influence for Bram Stoker’s vampire, Dracula. It also boasts a staggering 1480 stone steps, which you can still climb today.

[h/t Simply Savvy]

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