Millennials Get Blamed for a Lot, But They Could Help to Save the U.S. Postal Service

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iStock

Millennials get a bad rap for destroying everything from homeownership rates to fabric softener sales, but there's one important traditional industry they're enthusiastic about: the U.S. Postal Service. According to CityLab, a new USPS report [PDF] finds that young people's appreciation for snail mail could help boost the often-struggling agency's fortunes in the future.

Probing for insights into the minds of young people ages 18 to 34 (a little off from the Pew Research Center's definition of Millennials as being people ages 22 to 37), the USPS conducted surveys and hosted live chats online to figure out what Millennials think of the agency, and how the Postal Service can ignite their love of snail mail.

That's vital, because as it is, technological innovations like email and online bill payments are putting the USPS out of business. It lost money for the 11th year in a row in 2017, and while shipping packages is getting more popular (thank you, online shopping habits), it hasn't been enough to offset the decline of mail during that year—mail rates declined by 50 billion pieces in 2017. Young people ages 18 to 34 received an average of 17 pieces of mail each week in 2001, while they only receive 10 now.

But Millennials, it turns out, love mail, even if they don't want to pay their bills with it. As the report observes, "many Millennials still delight in receiving personalized notes or cards around holidays, birthdays, and other special occasions." Three-quarters of respondents said that getting personalized mail from friends and family "makes them feel special." According to the report, around 80 percent of Millennials say they're satisfied with the USPS, around the same rate as older, stamp-loving generations. More Millennials than Boomers, meanwhile, have a USPS.com account, and 59 percent say that the USPS is an innovative organization.

Millennials mentioned several ideas for USPS improvements that already basically exist, like self-service kiosks, at-home package pickup, and Informed Delivery emails, meaning the Postal Service isn't always the best at getting the word out about the cool things it already does. The report also shows that the Postal Service is still working on an augmented reality service that could give you a look at what's inside a package before you open it. (The idea debuted in 2016, but the app was largely limited to showing animated messages.)

The surveys and discussions did come up with a new idea to endear the post office to Millennials: a rewards program. The young people surveyed suggested that members could earn points by buying stamps or mailing packages and use them to redeem discounts or enter contests.

Millennials: They may be ruining vacations, but at least they're ready to save the mail.

[h/t CityLab]

Wednesday’s Best Amazon Deals Include Computer Monitors, Plant-Based Protein Powder, and Blu-ray Sets

Amazon
Amazon
As a recurring feature, our team combs the web and shares some amazing Amazon deals we’ve turned up. Here’s what caught our eye today, December 2. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers, including Amazon, and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we only get commission on items you buy and don’t return, so we’re only happy if you’re happy. Good luck deal hunting!

PBS Will Air A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving and A Charlie Brown Christmas, Saving the Holiday Season

Charlie Brown and friends ready for a feast.
Charlie Brown and friends ready for a feast.
Apple TV+

Last month, it was announced that the Peanuts holiday specials for Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Christmas wouldn’t air on network television this year, breaking a tradition that began more than 50 years ago. Instead, they’d be available to stream on Apple TV+. Even though non-subscribers would be able to view the programs for free on certain dates, the news still caused a small uproar across social media.

Now, PBS is here to save the day. As Deadline reports, Apple TV+ has given the channel permission to air A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving (1973) and A Charlie Brown Christmas (1965) once each, without ads. PBS and PBS KIDS will broadcast A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving on Sunday, November 22, at 7:30 p.m. EST; A Charlie Brown Christmas will follow a few weeks later on Sunday, December 13, also at 7:30 p.m. EST. Not only will the broadcasts help foster a collective holiday spirit at a time when families might not be physically together, but they’ll also give people without access to Apple TV+ an opportunity to enjoy the specials.

Though the shift to streaming upset some Peanuts fans, it’s not the first time that the rights have changed hands. CBS originally produced and premiered the holiday specials beginning in the 1960s, but they gave the reins to ABC in the early 2000s. Whether the PBS broadcast will become a new annual tradition remains to be seen; in the meantime, all Peanuts content, new and old, will live on Apple TV+.

If you can’t catch the holiday specials on PBS this year—and if you can access Apple TV+—feel free to stream A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving for free from November 25 to November 27, and A Charlie Brown Christmas from December 11 to December 13.

[h/t Deadline]