Gustav Klimt's Masterpieces Get a 21st-Century Makeover at Paris's First Digital Fine Arts Museum

Atelier des Lumières © Culturespaces/Eric Spiller
Atelier des Lumières © Culturespaces/Eric Spiller

Paris' first digital art museum is taking the paintings of Gustav Klimt out of their frames (so to speak) and projecting them onto the walls in its inaugural exhibit.

The museum, called the Atelier des Lumières, moved into a warehouse-like former foundry building in the 11th arrondissement last April and opened the exhibition, titled simply "Gustav Klimt." Works by the titular 20th century painter as well as other major Viennese artists including Egon Schiele and Friedensreich Hundertwasser light up walls that reach a height of 10 meters (approximately 33 feet), per Dezeen. Visitors will hear a soundtrack that includes Wagner, Beethoven, and Chopin courtesy of a 50-speaker sound system. The exhibit coincides with the 100th anniversary of the deaths of Klimt and Schiele.

Atelier des Lumières' unorthodox art space and use of digital technology aims to reach an audience of people who don't usually go to museums. "It allows visitors to discover art from a new angle and through immersive experiences. We combine classical art and digital art—I am convinced that the marriage of art and digital technology is the future of the dissemination of art among future generations," museum director Michael Couzigou told Dezeen. "This approach is not intended to replace museums but is a complementary approach to art," he reassures museum-lovers.

Head to Atelier des Lumières before the exhibit closes on January 6, 2019 to enjoy an afternoon spent immersed in the lively colors and golden patterns of Klimt's oeuvre.

 An image of a Gustav Klimt exhibition at Atelier des Lumières in Paris
Atelier des Lumières © Culturespaces/Eric Spiller

An image of a Gustav Klimt exhibition at Atelier des Lumières in Paris
Atelier des Lumières © Culturespaces/Eric Spiller

An image of a Gustav Klimt exhibition at Atelier des Lumières in Paris
Atelier des Lumières © Culturespaces/Eric Spiller

[h/t Dezeen]

This Outdoor Lantern Will Keep Mosquitoes Away—No Bug Spray Necessary

Thermacell, Amazon
Thermacell, Amazon

With summer comes outdoor activities, and with those activities come mosquito bites. If you're one of the unlucky people who seem to attract the insects, you may be tempted to lock yourself inside for the rest of the season. But you don't have to choose between comfort and having a cocktail on the porch, because this lamp from Thermacell ($25) keeps outdoor spaces mosquito-free without the mess of bug spray.

The device looks like an ordinary lantern you would display on a patio, but it works like bug repellent. When it's turned on, a fuel cartridge in the center provides the heat needed to activate a repellent mat on top of the lamp. Once activated, the repellent in the mat creates a 15-by-15-foot bubble of protection that repels any mosquitos nearby, making it a great option for camping trips, days by the pool, and backyard barbecues.

Mosquito repellent lantern.

Unlike some other mosquito repellents, this lantern is clean, safe, and scent-free. It also provides light like a real lamp, so you can keep pests away without ruining your backyard's ambience.

The Thermacell mosquito repellent lantern is now available on Amazon. If you've already suffered your first mosquito bites of the summer, here's some insight into why that itch can be so excruciating.

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

In Bordeaux, France, a Former Nazi Submarine Base Has Been Transformed Into a Digital Art Gallery

Culturespaces
Culturespaces

When it opened on June 10, 2020, the Bassins de Lumières in France became the largest digital art gallery in the world. But history buffs may be more interested in the site's background than the art it contains: Before it became an art gallery, the concrete space held a fleet of Nazi submarines during World War II, Smithsonian reports.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Bassins de Lumières's spring 2020 opening date was delayed to June. Now guests can visit and see the works of painters Gustav Klimt, Paul Klee, and Egon Schiele digitally projected over the concrete structures. U-boat pens, reaching up to 300 feet long and 36 feet high, are now canvases for colorful portraits, landscapes, and abstract scenes. The water filling the space's four basins reflects the artwork from below, while visitors look down from walkways woven throughout the 130,000-square-foot space.

The base looked very different in the 1940s. Nazi Germany constructed it off the coast of Bordeaux as a place to keep its submarines safe from enemy attacks during repairs. The site was abandoned in 1944, but because it's so enormous, the city of Bordeaux decided it would be cheaper to keep it than to tear it down.

Several decades later, the defunct bunker has been given new life. Culturespaces, the organization behind the project, spent more than $15 million transforming the base into a multimedia art gallery. After showcasing the current roster of painters for the rest of the year, the space will feature new artists in 2021.

Culturespaces art gallery.

Culturespaces art gallery in France.

Art gallery in Nazi submarine base.

[h/t Smithsonian]