A Solar Storm Could Make the Northern Lights Visible Over Parts of the U.S. Tonight

Jonathan Nackstrand, AFP/Getty Images
Jonathan Nackstrand, AFP/Getty Images

You don't need to take a trip above the Arctic Circle to see the Northern Lights in person. If you live in the northern U.S., you may be able to witness the meteorological phenomenon tonight from your backyard. As Madison, Wisconsin's WKOW reports, a geomagnetic storm could make the aurora borealis visible over the states bordering Canada late Monday night and early Tuesday morning.

Auroras are the result of electrons carried by solar winds reacting to gases in the Earth's atmosphere. Our planet's magnetic field amplifies this effect, which is why the colorful light show typically occurs over the two poles where magnetic energy is most concentrated.

On some occasions, the magnetic field is disrupted in such a way that makes the Northern Lights visible at lower latitudes. That may be the case tonight when a solar storm temporarily alters the magnetic field over the upper contiguous states, according to the Space Weather Prediction Center.

To catch the rare spectacle, step outside sometime late Monday night or early Tuesday morning. Areas with clear northern horizons and minimal light pollution will be the best spots to scope out the lights. And clear skies are forecast for states like Wisconsin tonight, making your chances of seeing them even better.

The Northern Lights are unpredictable, but there's a whole industry built around helping tourists spot them. If you pay $1970 for this cruise, for example, you're guaranteed to see the lights or your next trip is free. Keep that in mind if you miss them this time around.

[h/t WKOW]

How to Livestream Tonight’s Super Pink Moon

Matt Cardy/Stringer/Getty Images
Matt Cardy/Stringer/Getty Images

On April 7, 2020, a super pink moon will appear over the horizon. Though it's not actually pink (the name's meaning comes from the wildflower Phlox subulata, or moss pink), the supermoon is still worth seeing. Today, the moon will reach the closest point to Earth in its orbit just hours before becoming completely full, which adds up to give us the biggest and brightest supermoon of the year. And no matter where you are in the world, you can livestream the spectacle online.

Slooh, a celestial event streaming service, will begin broadcasting the super pink moon at 7:30 p.m. ET tonight, April 7. A team of astronomy experts and educators will be joining the feed to provide commentary until the stream ends. You can tune in through Slooh's Facebook live event or YouTube channel for free, or you can become a member to watch it on their website.

Slooh has telescopes around the world that allow users to explore space from their computers. If you sign up for a membership today, you'll be able to capture and share photos of the supermoon, virtually interact with the experts at the live event, and personally control Slooh’s telescopes to customize your view of the moon. And when tonight's event is over, you'll still be able to virtually control Slooh's six telescopes in the Canary Islands and four telescopes in Chile throughout the year.

A basic, annual membership with Slooh costs $100. If you're a student, the service is offering a limited-edition price of $20 for individuals. The deal aims to promote remote teaching and learning during a time when schools around the world are closed.

For people living in cities with light pollution, celestial livestreams are a great alternative to real-life stargazing. Slooh isn't the only platform airing tonight's event. Today, the Virtual Telescope Project in Italy will host its own livestream of the super pink moon on YouTube.

A Super Pink Moon—the Biggest Supermoon of 2020—Is Coming In April

April's super pink moon will be extra big and bright (but still white).
April's super pink moon will be extra big and bright (but still white).
jakkapan21/iStock via Getty Images

The sky has already given us several spectacular reasons to look up this year. In addition to a few beautiful full moons, we’ve also gotten opportunities to see the moon share a “kiss” with Venus and even make Mars briefly disappear.

In early April, avid sky-gazers are in for another treat—a super pink moon, the biggest supermoon of 2020. This full moon is considered a supermoon because it coincides with the moon’s perigee, or the point in the moon’s monthly orbit when it’s closest to Earth. According to EarthSky, the lunar perigee occurs on April 7 at 2:08 p.m. EST, and the peak of the full moon follows just hours later, at 10:35 p.m. EST.

How a supermoon is different.

Since the super pink moon will be closer to Earth than any other full moon this year, it will be 2020’s biggest and brightest. It’s also the second of three consecutive supermoons, sandwiched between March’s worm moon and May’s flower moon. Because supermoons only appear about 7 percent bigger and 15 percent brighter than regular full moons, you might not notice a huge difference—but even the most ordinary full moon is pretty breathtaking, so the super pink moon is worth an upward glance when night falls on April 7.

The meaning of pink moon.

Despite its name, the super pink moon will still shine with a normal golden-white glow. As The Old Farmer’s Almanac explains, April’s full moon derives its misleading moniker from an eastern North American wildflower called Phlox subulata, or moss pink, that usually blooms in early April. It’s also called the paschal moon, since its timing helps the Catholic Church set the date for Easter (the word paschal means “of or relating to Easter”).

[h/t EarthSky]

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