Construction Workers in Italy Uncover a Jar of 5th-Century Gold Coins Potentially Worth Millions

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iStock

A historic site in the Italian city of Como near Milan has produced an exciting discovery. As CNN reports, workers excavating the basement of the defunct Cressoni Theater stumbled upon a soapstone jar containing a stash of Roman coins dating back to the 5th century CE.

Italian media outlets estimate the remarkably well-preserved gold pieces could be worth millions of dollars. The coins were uncovered during the first week of September, then handed over to the restoration lab at Italy's Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities, where they will be studied and restored.

The theater where the coins were found is close to the former site of Novum Comum, an ancient Roman town that dates back to the 1st century BCE. The area has proven to be a hotbed of ancient Roman artifacts. This latest find can be traced back to the tail end of the Western Roman Empire.

The Cressoni Theater opened in Como in 1807. It was converted to a cinema in the 20th century, and then in 1997, the building shut down for good. The plan was to build a luxury apartment complex in its place when the coin hoard was discovered. In light of the find, the construction project will be put on hold to allow archaeologists to explore the site further.

[h/t CNN]

Demolition of a Condemned Pennsylvania Bar Reveals 18th-Century Log Cabin

taviphoto, iStock via Getty Images
taviphoto, iStock via Getty Images

Many unusual things have been discovered in the structures of old buildings. When contractors began demolishing a bar in Washingtonville, Pennsylvania, they didn't expect to find a separate building concealed within its paneling.

The log cabin uncovered in the bar was built as far back as the 18th century, Newsweek reports. Contractors were in the process of tearing down the condemned establishment when they noticed antique, exposed beams inside the building additions. As they removed more panels, a whole log cabin began to take shape.

The structure consists of two stories and spans 1200 square feet. The beams appear to be made of ax-cut hickory wood, but beyond that, little is known about the cabin or where it came from. A borough map from 1860 depicts a larger building where the cabin would be, indicating that the first additions were built onto it more than 150 years ago. The bar built at the site has been closed for around 12 years and condemned for more than three.

Washingtonville council president Frank Dombroski says the cabin is salvageable, but taking the necessary steps to preserve it will be difficult. The community lacks the funds necessary to rehabilitate it where it stands and keep it as a historic landmark. Instead, the council has decided to disassemble the structure piece-by-piece, number and catalog it, and reconstruct it someplace else. Until then, the building in its exposed state will remain in its original location on the corner of Water and Front Streets.

[h/t Newsweek]

Ancient Human Remains Were Found During a Father-Son Bike Trip in Washington

Brothers_Art/iStock via Getty Images
Brothers_Art/iStock via Getty Images

Among the things you can expect from a leisurely bike ride with your 4-year-old son—fresh air, exercise, bonding—accidentally stumbling upon ancient human remains is not among them. Yet that’s exactly what happened to Matt Kiddle earlier this month near Port Angeles, Washington, when a spin around the area revealed a weathered skull erupting from the ground.

Kiddle was biking with his son, Ivan, along the Olympic Discovery Trail when the two came across the skull and mandible. The pair climbed off his bike and walked on to the beach for a closer look, where Kiddle also noticed a scapula, or shoulder blade. Later, another pedestrian noticed a hip bone.

Fearing they had stumbled upon a crime scene, Kiddle examined the remains and realized the bones were likely old. He called the police. A forensic archaeologist determined they’re between 500 and 1000 years old and are of Native-American origin.

"Frankly, my first reaction was, what poor individual is missing that I just found their bones, then I quickly realized they were very old and likely Native American, and some form of ancient individual," Kiddle, a physician assistant, told the Peninsula Daily News.

How did the remains manage to become visible? Parts of the Trail have crumbled due to coastal erosion, revealing below-surface discoveries like this one.

The Washington Department of Archaeological and Historic Preservation will now look to determine which tribe the deceased belonged to so the bones can be repatriated and properly laid to rest.

[h/t Smithsonian]

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