This Build-Your-Own Touchscreen Computer Will Help Your Kid Learn to Code

Kano
Kano

Though most people rely on computers and smart phones every single day, many of us have almost no clue how these machines work. The coding education startup Kano hopes to change that by showing kids how to assemble their own computers with step-by-step instructions. And now, it’s teaching kids how to put together touchscreens.

Kano’s new Computer Kit Touch lets you build a touchscreen computer that you can use to play Kano's coding games. It comes equipped with a 10-inch screen that you hook up to a Raspberry Pi computer, as well as a separate keyboard with a trackpad.

Like the rest of Kano’s products, putting together the computer is simple enough. You just need to follow a streamlined set of illustrated directions akin to what you’d get if you were putting together a set of LEGOs. In the process, kids can learn the basics of computing without getting too overwhelmed by tech specs.

A disassembled touch computer kit
Kano

Once assembled and booted up, the computer runs on Kano’s custom educational operating system. Kids can add apps like YouTube and Whatsapp, play Kano’s coding games, making art projects, and explore Kano World, the social learning community where users share the cool things they’ve come up with using their own kits. The touchscreen kit is essentially a revved-up version of the original computer kit, adding in the ability to draw and gesture with the touchscreen as part of its coding games and challenges, while still allowing you to use a keyboard if you want to.

It seems obvious that a kid-focused company like Kano would want to get into the touchscreen game. Many children love tablets and other touchscreens, much to the chagrin of parents and education experts who worry that so much screen time might be harming their development. In 2017, Common Sense Media reported that 42 percent of kids between the ages of 0 and 8 had their own tablet at home. Parents who are concerned about their kids spending an unhealthy amount of time with touchscreens might feel more at peace giving them something like Kano, which combines the fun parts of an iPad—i.e., access to YouTube—with games and challenges that are specifically tailored to helping kids learn.

Kano launched its original computer kit on Kickstarter in 2013, and has recently been expanding its offerings beyond the computers themselves. Earlier this year, the company came out with a Harry Potter wand kit, and prior to that, the company debuted a motion sensor, a camera, and a light-pixel array, among other gadgets, all designed to help kids learn coding skills.

The touchscreen kit sells for $279.

This Outdoor Lantern Will Keep Mosquitoes Away—No Bug Spray Necessary

Thermacell, Amazon
Thermacell, Amazon

With summer comes outdoor activities, and with those activities come mosquito bites. If you're one of the unlucky people who seem to attract the insects, you may be tempted to lock yourself inside for the rest of the season. But you don't have to choose between comfort and having a cocktail on the porch, because this lamp from Thermacell ($25) keeps outdoor spaces mosquito-free without the mess of bug spray.

The device looks like an ordinary lantern you would display on a patio, but it works like bug repellent. When it's turned on, a fuel cartridge in the center provides the heat needed to activate a repellent mat on top of the lamp. Once activated, the repellent in the mat creates a 15-by-15-foot bubble of protection that repels any mosquitos nearby, making it a great option for camping trips, days by the pool, and backyard barbecues.

Mosquito repellent lantern.

Unlike some other mosquito repellents, this lantern is clean, safe, and scent-free. It also provides light like a real lamp, so you can keep pests away without ruining your backyard's ambience.

The Thermacell mosquito repellent lantern is now available on Amazon. If you've already suffered your first mosquito bites of the summer, here's some insight into why that itch can be so excruciating.

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The Reason Apple Doesn’t Include a Calculator With the iPad

The Apple iPad.
The Apple iPad.
Apple

Portable computing got a major upgrade in 2010 when Apple launched its iPad, a handheld touchscreen display that could run apps, play video, and destroy productivity with games like Fruit Ninja. For all its versatility, however, no version of the iPad—including the Pro, Mini, or Air—has ever shipped with what has become a standard feature in operating systems: a calculator.

While there’s been no firm explanation from Apple as to why this is, back in 2016 a Reddit post from someone claiming to be an ex-employee of the company offered a possible reason. According to user Tangoshukudai, early iPad prototypes ported over Apple’s conventional iOS calculator, which was stretched to fit the iPad’s screen. As development continued, no one paid much attention to the distorted image of the calculator until it was too late. When the late Apple CEO Steve Jobs finally noticed it, he demanded it be removed.

Ever since, according to Tangoshukudai, no one at Apple has bothered with programming a calculator to fit the iPad’s dimensions. The most recent operating system, iPadOS 14, has not announced a native calculator.

Does that mean iPad users can never crunch numbers? Not exactly. Users can download a third-party app, or they can access a stealth calculator that first appeared with Apple’s iPadOS 9. Swipe down on the home screen to get to the Spotlight search screen. By entering equations into the search bar, the iPad will recognize that some math is needed and provide an answer. You can also use it as a currency and unit converter. Having an Apple calculator readily accessible onscreen, however, will apparently have to wait.

[h/t Cult of Mac]