Game of Thrones's Maisie Williams Teases Progress for Women in Final Season

HBO
HBO

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The latest season of HBO's smash-hit fantasy epic Game of Thrones gave new perspective to fan-favorite character ​Arya Stark. Since season one, viewers had seen her grow from a terrified but resourceful young girl to a capable and confident assassin. However, season seven let her finally interact with her family once more, and instead of supporting her growth, they were horrified by her transformation.

Particularly her sister Sansa, who had gone through her own tragic journey in the intervening time, was initially distrustful of her younger, long-lost sibling. This had the effect of reframing Arya's transition as the development of a mass murderer rather than a woman coming into her own, a change of pace that actress ​Maisie Williams apparently enjoyed.

"I’m the ​serial killer everyone’s rooting for," she said in an interview with Elle. "I think until last season, Arya was always killing the baddies. But then we saw her start to use those manipulative powers. It’s not until she had that whole dialogue with her sister Sansa in the last season that you realize what she’s become, that she’s being awful to someone who we love."

This recontextualization comes after years of Game of Thrones being accused of sexism, often forcing its female characters into sexually compromising situations or shortchanging their narratives in favor of developing male characters. When asked about the phenomenon, Williams gave her two cents on the matter and took it a step further to discuss how the upcoming final season of the show addresses the problem.

"It is a medieval world in which women don’t have a lot of rights, and yet they still prevail," Williams shared. "But I do think that as the seasons have gone on, it’s become more and more amazing for women. And this final season is going to be incredible. It just feels great, being on set with all these girls. They’re all ruling, you know, they’re all back on top. It’s pretty impressive."

She does have a point. Going into the eighth season of the show, most of the remaining main characters are women, and two out of the three primary contenders for the coveted Iron Throne are queens. The ​final season recently wrapped its filming and is set to air sometime in early-to-mid 2019.

Apple Reportedly Won't Let Movie Bad Guys Use iPhones

Jamie Lee Curtis, Don Johnson, Toni Collette, Christopher Plummer, K Callan, Chris Evans, Michael Shannon, Riki Lindhome, Ana de Armas, Jaeden Martell, and Katherine Langford in Rian Johnson's Knives Out (2019).
Jamie Lee Curtis, Don Johnson, Toni Collette, Christopher Plummer, K Callan, Chris Evans, Michael Shannon, Riki Lindhome, Ana de Armas, Jaeden Martell, and Katherine Langford in Rian Johnson's Knives Out (2019).
Claire Folger © 2018 MRC II Distribution Company L.P. All rights reserved.

Like any good whodunit, Knives Out (2019) is filled with twists that keep viewers guessing who the true villain is throughout the film. But there's a major clue as to who the good guys and bad guys are hidden in plain sight. To spot it, just look at what type of smartphone the characters are holding.

As Knives Out writer and director Rian Johnson revealed in a recent video for Vanity Fair, Apple won't let an iPhone appear on film if it belongs to a villain. "I don't know if I should say this or not," Johnson said. "Apple, they let you use iPhones in movies[...]but bad guys cannot have iPhones on camera[...]Every single filmmaker who has a bad guy in their movie that's supposed to be a secret wants to murder me right now." You can listen to the tidbit at the 2:50-minute mark in the video below.

Apple has long used product placement in movies and television shows to promote its brand. There's even reportedly an employee at Apple whose job it is to work with Hollywood to get MacBooks and iPhones into the hands of characters on screen. The ubiquity of Apple gadgets in media means the lack of one could be a legitimate spoiler in a murder mystery. Apple has also been tight-lipped about its product placement rules, making Johnson's revelation an especially juicy insight.

If you're looking for more film secrets, check out these hidden messages in the backgrounds of your favorite movies and TV shows.

[h/t The Next Web]

The Office Children's Book Is Coming to Introduce Your Kids to Dunder Mifflin

The Office: A Day at Dunder Mifflin Elementary is coming from Little, Brown Books for Young Readers in October.
The Office: A Day at Dunder Mifflin Elementary is coming from Little, Brown Books for Young Readers in October.
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers/Amazon

Thanks to constant TV reruns and easy access via Netflix, The Office hasn't lost any of its popularity since airing its series finale in 2013. Now the beloved sitcom is about to be introduced to a whole new audience that (fortunately) isn't old enough to understand what Michael Scott means when he says "That's what she said." As Entertainment Weekly reports, a new book for kids, The Office: A Day at Dunder Mifflin Elementary, is debuting later this year.

While it might be hard to imagine how a children's book all about Dunder Mifflin would work, now that we're getting a glimpse at it, it seems like the best idea ever. A Day at Dunder Mifflin Elementary will introduce your little ones to all your favorite paper company employees—though they won't be the same Jim and Pam we all know so well. In this book, the illustrated characters are all school-aged.

The 40-page book is written by Robb Pearlman, author of Bob Ross and Peapod the Squirrel, Pink is for Boys, and Star Trek: Fun with Kirk and Spock, and illustrated by Melanie Demmer, who works on the My Furry Foster Family series. Though the book is intended for kids ages 4 to 8, you can be sure that we'll be reading it, too.

The Office: A Day at Dunder Mifflin Elementary won't be hitting stores until October 6, 2020, but you can preorder your copy for $18 on Amazon now. And if you're looking for more Office collectibles that are available right now, head here.

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