Scientists Find We're Pooping Out Plastic

iStock.com/FluxFactory
iStock.com/FluxFactory

Unless you’re very ill, it’s not likely anyone will be analyzing your poop under a microscope anytime soon. But if someone did, you might be surprised that among the assorted bacteria and waste lurks something a little more disconcerting: traces of plastic.

The disturbing revelation that humans are internalizing plastic material was announced this week at the United European Gastroenterology conference in Vienna. Researchers at the Medical University of Vienna found plastic in stool samples from eight donors, each from a different country (Poland, Russia, Japan, the Netherlands, the UK, Austria, Finland, and Italy). The poop donors volunteered their excrement for the sake of science, shipping their deposits in biohazard packaging for lab evaluation under the direction of the Environment Agency Austria. All submitted samples tested positive for a variety of plastics, from polyethylene (found in storage containers) to polypropylene (bottle caps) to PVC.

For each quarter-pound of the samples, 20 particles of microplastics were discovered ranging in size from 50 to 500 microns. A 50-micron particle is the smallest visible to the human eye.

Naturally, this means we have to be ingesting plastic in order to be excreting it. Scientists aren’t yet sure of the exact sources, though the food logs submitted by subjects might provide some clues. They drank from plastic bottles, ate from plastic containers, and ate fish that may have been exposed to plastic waste in polluted water.

The discovery is likely to encourage more wide-ranging studies involving a greater number of individuals about the possible health effects of having plastic particles in our digestive systems or bloodstreams. It may also be a call to reduce our dependence on plastics in general, and for food-related purposes specifically. In the meantime, gratitude is due the researchers and microscopists who went through a lot of crap to retrieve this data.

[h/t WIRED]

These Rugged Steel-Toe Boots Look and Feel Like Summer Sneakers

Indestructible Shoes
Indestructible Shoes

Thanks to new, high-tech materials, our favorite shoes are lighter and more comfortable than ever. Unfortunately, one thing most sneakers are not is durable. They can’t protect your feet from the rain, let alone heavy objects. Luckily, as their name implies, Indestructible Shoes has come up with a line of steel-toe boots that look and feel like regular sneakers.

Made to be incredibly strong but still lightweight, every pair of Indestructible Shoes has steel toes, skid-proof grips, and shock-absorption technology. But they don't look clunky or bulky, which makes them suitable whether you're going to work, the gym, or a family gathering.

The Hummer is Indestructible Shoes’s most well-rounded model. It features European steel toes to protect your feet, while the durable "flymesh" material wicks moisture to keep your feet feeling fresh. The insole features 3D arch support and extra padding in the heel cup. And the outsole features additional padding that distributes weight and helps your body withstand strain.

Indestructible Shoes Hummer.
The Hummer from Indestructible Shoes.
Indestructible Shoes

There’s also the Xciter, Indestructible Shoes’s latest design. The company prioritized comfort for this model, with the same steel toes as the Hummer, but with additional extra-large, no-slip outsoles capable of gripping even smooth, slippery surfaces—like, say, a boat deck. The upper is made of breathable moisture-wicking flymesh to help keep your feet dry in the rain or if you're wearing them on the water.

If you want a more breathable shoe for the peak summer months, there's the Ryder. This shoe is designed to be a stylish solution to the problem of sweaty feet, thanks to a breathable mesh that maximizes airflow and minimizes sweat and odor. Meanwhile, extra padding in the midsole will keep your feet protected.

You can get 44 percent off all styles if you order today.

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

How the Scientist Who Invented Ibuprofen Accidentally Discovered It Was Great for Hangovers

This man had too many dry martinis at a business lunch.
This man had too many dry martinis at a business lunch.
George Marks/Retrofile/Getty Images

When British pharmacologist Stewart Adams and his colleague John Nicholson began tinkering with various drug compounds in the 1950s, they were hoping to come up with a cure for rheumatoid arthritis—something with the anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin, but without the risk of allergic reaction or internal bleeding.

Though they never exactly cured rheumatoid arthritis, they did succeed in developing a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that greatly reduced pain of all kinds. In 1966, they patented their creation, which was first known as 2-(4-isobutylphenyl) propionic acid and later renamed ibuprofen. While originally approved as a prescription drug in the UK, it soon became clear ibuprofen was safer and more effective than other pain relievers. It eventually hit the market as an over-the-counter medication.

During that time, Adams conducted one last impromptu experiment with the drug, which took place far outside the lab and involved only a single participant: himself.

In 1971, Adams arrived in Moscow to speak at a pharmacology conference and spent the night before his scheduled appearance tossing back shots of vodka at a reception with the other attendees. When he awoke the next morning, he was greeted with a hammering headache. So, as Smithsonian.com reports, Adams tossed back 600 milligrams of ibuprofen.

“That was testing the drug in anger, if you like,” Adams told The Telegraph in 2007. “But I hoped it really could work magic.”

As anyone who has ever been in that situation can probably predict, the ibuprofen did work magic on Adams’s hangover. After that, according to The Washington Post, the pharmaceutical company Adams worked for began promoting the drug as a general painkiller, and people started to stumble upon its use as a miracle hangover cure.

“It's funny now,” Adams told The Telegraph. “But over the years so many people have told me that ibuprofen really works for them, and did I know it was so good for hangovers? Of course, I had to admit I did.”

[h/t Smithsonian.com]