Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Discovered on International Space Station Toilet

Antibiotic resistance isn’t just a problem on Earth. It’s happening in space, too. LiveScience reports that NASA scientists have found drug-resistant bacteria in samples from one of the space toilets on the International Space Station.

As part of a study published in the journal BMC Microbiology, scientists from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory looked at waste samples taken from the ISS in 2015. They isolated five strains of Enterobacter bugandensis bacteria, sequencing their genomes and analyzing their susceptibility to antibiotics. They compared these space strains to strains found on Earth, including some that have been linked to patients in hospital settings.

Normally, because of the lack of interplanetary sewers, astronaut waste is simply flushed into space, where it will incinerate on its way back through Earth’s atmosphere. But for the sake of NASA’s ongoing catalog of microbes found on the ISS, some lucky astronaut got to swab the station’s toilet for samples. They also swabbed the station’s Advanced Resistive Exercise Device, one of the exercise machines astronauts use on the ISS to keep up muscle mass during long periods living in microgravity.

The space toilet where astronauts collected microbial swabsJack Fischer, NASA

Based on their similarity to bacteria strains taken from patients on Earth, the analysis found that the strains isolated from the ISS swabs have a 79 percent probability that they could cause disease in humans. They contained genes associated with antibiotic resistance and toxic compounds.

"Given the multi-drug resistance results for these ISS E. bugandensis genomes and the increased chance of pathogenicity we have identified, these species potentially pose important health considerations for future missions,” the study's lead author, Dr. Nitin Singh, said in a statement. “However, it is important to understand that the strains found on the ISS were not virulent, which means they are not an active threat to human health, but something to be monitored." That means that while astronauts don't need to worry about these bacteria just yet, antibiotic resistance is an issue that NASA will need to prepare for in the future.

[h/t LiveScience]

Whiten Your Teeth From Home for $40 With This Motorized Toothbrush

AquaSonic
AquaSonic

Since many people aren't exactly rushing to see their dentist during the COVID-19 pandemic, it's become more important than ever to find the best at-home products to maintain your oral hygiene. And if you're looking for a high-quality motorized toothbrush, you can take advantage of this deal on the AquaSonic Black Series model, which is currently on sale for 71 percent off.

This smart toothbrush can actually tell you how long to keep the brush in one place to get the most thorough cleaning—and that’s just one of the ways it can remove more plaque than an average toothbrush. The brush also features multiple modes that can whiten teeth, adjust for sensitive teeth, and massage your gums for better blood flow.

As you’d expect from any smart device, modern technology doesn’t stop at functionality. The design of the AquaSonic Black Series is sleek enough to seamlessly fit in with a modern aesthetic, and the charging base is cordless so it’s easy to bring on the go. The current deal even includes a travel case and eight Dupont replacement heads.

Right now, you can find the AquaSonic Black Series toothbrush on sale for just $40.

Price subject to change.

 

AquaSonic Black Series Toothbrush & Travel Case With 8 Dupont Brush Heads - $39.99

See Deal


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The NEOWISE Comet Is Visible This Month—But Won't Be Again for 6000 Years

NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Naval Research Lab/Parker Solar Probe/Brendan Gallagher
NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Naval Research Lab/Parker Solar Probe/Brendan Gallagher

On March 27, 2020, NASA’s Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer discovered a new comet in our celestial neighborhood. The C/2020 F3 NEOWISE comet (or comet NEOWISE for short) became visible to more people than ever when it began appearing in northern latitudes during evening hours this month. If you want to catch the spectacle, July is the time to do so: After comet NEOWISE passes by Earth, it won't be visible for another 6000 years, Lifehacker reports.

Recently, comet NEOWISE appeared above the northern horizon in the predawn sky in the northern U.S. and Canada. Around July 12 through 15, the comet will start popping up after sunset as well as before sunrise. For your best chance at seeing it, wait until the evening of July 22 or the morning of the 23rd. According to EarthSky, that's when the comet flies closest to Earth. If comet NEOWISE maintains its current brightness, conditions will be best for spotting it on those dates.

Comet NEOWISE is technically a "naked eye" comet, but finding without equipment will be difficult. Shortly after sunset, grab your binoculars and look to the northwestern sky. It will appear closer to the horizon if you live farther south, and higher in the sky at higher latitudes. With each passing night, NEOWISE will creep higher, ending up beneath the Big Dipper when it reaches peak visibility on July 23.

Binoculars will make it easy to find comet NEOWISE and see its split tail. After locating the comet with your binoculars, you can try spotting it on your own. Comet NEOWISE looks like a blurry dot with the naked eye. Following its current visit, the C/2020 F3 NEOWISE won't be back in the night sky until around the year 8736.

[h/t Lifehacker]