2019 Golden Globe Nominations: Complete List

Matt Kennedy, Annapurna Pictures 2018
Matt Kennedy, Annapurna Pictures 2018

The year is quickly coming to an end, and just as the holiday season is kicking off, so too is awards season. One of the biggest nights in Hollywood, the Golden Globes, will take place on January 6, 2019—and the nominations are officially out.

From obvious awards contenders to a few pretty big surprises, here is the full list of nominees (with Adam McKay's Dick Cheney biopic, Vice, leading the pack with six nominations).

Best Motion Picture – Drama

Black Panther
BlacKkKlansman
Bohemian Rhapsody
If Beale Street Could Talk
A Star Is Born

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama

Glenn Close (The Wife)
Lady Gaga (A Star Is Born)
Nicole Kidman (Destroyer)
Melissa McCarthy (Can You Ever Forgive Me?)
Rosamund Pike (A Private War)

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama

Bradley Cooper (A Star Is Born)
Willem Dafoe (At Eternity’s Gate)
Lucas Hedges (Boy Erased)
Rami Malek (Bohemian Rhapsody)
John David Washington (BlacKkKlansman)

Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

Crazy Rich Asians The Favourite
Green Book
Mary Poppins Returns
Vice

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

Emily Blunt (Mary Poppins Returns)
Olivia Colman (The Favourite)
Elsie Fisher (Eighth Grade)
Charlize Theron (Tully)
Constance Wu (Crazy Rich Asians)

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

Christian Bale (Vice)
Lin-Manuel Miranda (Mary Poppins Returns)
Viggo Mortensen (Green Book)
Robert Redford (The Old Man & the Gun)
John C. Reilly (Stan & Ollie)

Best Actress in a Supporting Role in any Motion Picture

Amy Adams (Vice)
Claire Foy (First Man)
Regina King (If Beale Street Could Talk)
Emma Stone (The Favourite)
Rachel Weisz (The Favourite)

Best Actor in a Supporting Role in any Motion Picture

Mahershala Ali (Green Book)
Timothée Chalamet (Beautiful Boy)
Adam Driver (BlacKkKlansman)
Richard E. Grant (Can You Ever Forgive Me?)
Sam Rockwell (Vice)

Best Motion Picture – Animated

Incredibles 2
Isle of Dogs
Mirai
Ralph Breaks the Internet
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Best Motion Picture – Foreign Language

Capernaum
Girl
Never Look Away
Roma
Shoplifters

Best Director – Motion Picture

Bradley Cooper (A Star Is Born)
Alfonso Cuarón (Roma)
Peter Farrelly (Green Book)
Spike Lee (BlacKkKlansman)
Adam McKay (Vice)

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture

Alfonso Cuarón (Roma)
Deborah Davis and Tony McNamara (The Favourite)
Barry Jenkins (If Beale Street Could Talk)
Adam McKay (Vice)
Peter Farrelly, Nick Vallelonga, Brian Currie (Green Book)

Best Original Score – Motion Picture

Marco Beltrami (A Quiet Place)
Alexandre Desplat (Isle of Dogs)
Ludwig Göransson (Black Panther)
Justin Hurwitz (First Man)
Marc Shaiman (Mary Poppins Returns)

Best Original Song – Motion Picture

"All the Stars" (Black Panther)
"Girl in the Movies" (Dumplin’)
"Requiem For a Private War" (A Private War)
"Revelation" (Boy Erased)
"Shallow" (A Star Is Born)

Best Television Series – Drama

The Americans
Bodyguard
Homecoming
Killing Eve
Pose

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Drama

Caitriona Balfe (Outlander)
Elisabeth Moss (The Handmaid’s Tale)
Sandra Oh (Killing Eve)
Julia Roberts (Homecoming)
Keri Russell (The Americans)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama

Jason Bateman (Ozark)
Stephan James (Homecoming)
Richard Madden (Bodyguard)
Billy Porter (Pose)
Matthew Rhys (The Americans)

Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy

Barry (HBO)
The Good Place (NBC)
Kidding (Showtime)
The Kominsky Method (Netflix)
The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel (Amazon)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy

Kristen Bell (The Good Place)
Candice Bergen (Murphy Brown)
Alison Brie (Glow)
Rachel Brosnahan (The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel)
Debra Messing (Will & Grace)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy

Sacha Baron Cohen (Who Is America?)
Jim Carrey (Kidding)
Michael Douglas (The Kominsky Method)
Donald Glover (Atlanta)
Bill Hader (Barry)

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

The Alienist (TNT)
The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story (FX)
Escape at Dannemora (Showtime)
Sharp Objects (HBO)
A Very English Scandal (Amazon)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Amy Adams (Sharp Objects)
Patricia Arquette (Escape at Dannemora)
Connie Britton (Dirty John)
Laura Dern (The Tale)
Regina King (Seven Seconds)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Antonio Banderas (Genius: Picasso)
Daniel Bruhl (The Alienist)
Darren Criss (The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story)
Benedict Cumberbatch (Patrick Melrose)
Hugh Grant (A Very English Scandal)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Alex Borstein (The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel)
Patricia Clarkson (Sharp Objects)
Penélope Cruz (The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story)
Thandie Newton (Westworld)
Yvonne Strahovski (The Handmaid’s Tale)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Alan Arkin (The Kominsky Method)
Kieran Culkin (Succession)
Édgar Ramírez (The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story)
Ben Whishaw (A Very English Scandal)
Henry Winkler (Barry)

Right off the bat, fans are noticing the Globes have snubbed This is Us, the NBC favorite which was expected to be nominated in the Best Drama Series category, along with stars Mandy Moore, Chrissy Metz, and Sterling K. Brown. Brown even made history with his win for This is Us last year, becoming the first black actor to win a Golden Globe for a TV drama.

TV series Glow, Atlanta, and Westworld were also surprisingly not recognized as shows.

Now it's time to start making our bets on who will take home the biggest awards of the night.

Looking to Downsize? You Can Buy a 5-Room DIY Cabin on Amazon for Less Than $33,000

Five rooms of one's own.
Five rooms of one's own.
Allwood/Amazon

If you’ve already mastered DIY houses for birds and dogs, maybe it’s time you built one for yourself.

As Simplemost reports, there are a number of house kits that you can order on Amazon, and the Allwood Avalon Cabin Kit is one of the quaintest—and, at $32,990, most affordable—options. The 540-square-foot structure has enough space for a kitchen, a bathroom, a bedroom, and a sitting room—and there’s an additional 218-square-foot loft with the potential to be the coziest reading nook of all time.

You can opt for three larger rooms if you're willing to skip the kitchen and bathroom.Allwood/Amazon

The construction process might not be a great idea for someone who’s never picked up a hammer, but you don’t need an architectural degree to tackle it. Step-by-step instructions and all materials are included, so it’s a little like a high-level IKEA project. According to the Amazon listing, it takes two adults about a week to complete. Since the Nordic wood walls are reinforced with steel rods, the house can withstand winds up to 120 mph, and you can pay an extra $1000 to upgrade from double-glass windows and doors to triple-glass for added fortification.

Sadly, the cool ceiling lamp is not included.Allwood/Amazon

Though everything you need for the shell of the house comes in the kit, you will need to purchase whatever goes inside it: toilet, shower, sink, stove, insulation, and all other furnishings. You can also customize the blueprint to fit your own plans for the space; maybe, for example, you’re going to use the house as a small event venue, and you’d rather have two or three large, airy rooms and no kitchen or bedroom.

Intrigued? Find out more here.

[h/t Simplemost]

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

The Psychological Tricks Disney Parks Use to Make Long Wait Times More Bearable

© Jorge Royan, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0
© Jorge Royan, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0

No one goes to Disneyland or Disney World to spend the day waiting in line, but when a queue is well-designed, waiting can be part of the experience. Disney knows this better than anyone, and the parks' Imagineers have developed several tricks over the years to make long wait times as painless as possible.

According to Popular Science, hacking the layout of the line itself is a simple way to influence the rider's perspective. When a queue consists of 200 people zig-zagging around ropes in a large, open room, it's easy for waiting guests to feel overwhelmed. This design allows riders to see exactly how many people are in line in front of them—which isn't necessarily a good thing when the line is long.

Imagineers prevent this by keeping riders in the dark when they enter the queue. In Space Mountain, for example, walls are built around the twisting path, so riders have no idea how much farther they have to go until they're deeper into the building. This stops people from giving up when they first get in line.

Another example of deception ride designers use is the "Machiavellian twist." If you've ever been pleasantly surprised by a line that moved faster than you expected, that was intentional. The signs listing wait times at the beginning of ride queues purposefully inflate the numbers. That way, when a wait that was supposed to be 120 minutes goes by in 90, you feel like you have more time than you did before.

The final trick is something Disney parks are famous for: By incorporating the same level of production design found on the ride into the queue, Imagineers make waiting in line an engaging experience that has entertainment value of its own. The Tower of Terror queue in Disney World, which is modeled after a decrepit 1930s hotel lobby down to the cobwebs and the abandoned coffee cups, feels like it could be a movie set. Some ride lines even use special effects. While waiting to ride Star Wars: Ride of the Resistance in Galaxy's Edge, guests get to watch holograms and animatronics that set up the story of the ride. This strategy exploits the so-called dual-task paradigm, which makes the line feel as if it's going by faster by giving riders mental stimulation as they wait.

Tricky ride design is just one of Disney's secrets. Here are more behind-the-scenes facts about the beloved theme parks.

[h/t Popular Science]