The Time Australian Researchers Studied Why There Are Never Any Spoons in Your Office Kitchen

iStock.com/RobynRoper
iStock.com/RobynRoper

As with any communal space, office kitchens are replete with their own particular problems. There are always dirty coffee mugs in the sink, directly under the “please wash your dishes” sign. Lunches get stolen from the fridge, no matter how carefully—or passive-aggressively—they’re labeled. And inevitably, at some point, all the spoons will disappear.

That last part is pure scientific fact. The phenomenon of the missing office spoons once proved so consternating to a group of Australian public health researchers, in fact, that they conducted a whole study on it.

Included in 2005 in the British Medical Journal's annual Christmas issue—which publishes research on quirky topics like neck injuries in heavy metal musicians and the hypothesized walking speed of the Grim Reaper—the months-long study tracked the rapid loss of spoons in communal office kitchens at the Macfarlane Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health in Melbourne.

It began in early 2004, when the researchers discovered that their office tearoom (what Americans would call a break room) was completely devoid of the spoons necessary to measure out instant coffee and sugar. So they bought new spoons. Within a few months, those, too, had disappeared, never to be seen or stirred again.

To get to the bottom of the mystery of the vanishing utensils, they methodically put out 70 “discreetly numbered teaspoons” (i.e. labeled with red nail polish) in the eight communal break rooms around the institute, returning weekly to count how many spoons were left. Some of spoons were stainless steel while others were of a "higher quality," allowing the researchers to determine whether people would be more likely to walk off with a nicer spoon rather than run-of-the-mill silverware.

Office spoons, the researchers found, have a half-life of just 81 days. By that point in the experiment, half of the new spoons had permanently vanished. After five months, a full 80 percent of the spoons had disappeared. It didn’t matter whether the spoons were high-quality or average, though spoons placed in rooms that were used by more people at the institute disappeared faster than spoons in break rooms linked to specific programs.

When the researchers revealed their study to the rest of the colleagues, a select few spoon-hoarders came forward to return their utensils. But in total, only five of the 56 missing teaspoons were recovered. “Four of these were returned from areas far removed from their place of last observation; one had been missing for 20 weeks,” the researchers write. “No one admitted to the permanent removal of a teaspoon from the institute, and no plausible explanations were advanced for the high rate of teaspoon loss.” At this rate, they calculated, the institute would need to buy at least 252 teaspoons every year to maintain a workable ratio of one spoon to every two employees.

Their final conclusion? Employers need to buy more spoons, or their whole organization might fall apart. “The loss of workplace teaspoons was rapid,” they write, “showing that their availability, and hence office culture in general, is constantly threatened.” Without sufficient numbers of spoons, employees will quickly become dissatisfied with their workplace. They’ll have to waste precious company time tracking down something to measure out coffee and sugar—forks, knives, even staplers.

We don’t say this about most studies, but the paper is well worth reading in its entirety.

This Course Will Teach You How to Play Guitar Like a Pro for $29

BartekSzewczyk/iStock via Getty Images
BartekSzewczyk/iStock via Getty Images

Be honest: You’ve watched a YouTube video or two in an attempt to learn how to play a song on the guitar. Whether it was through tabs or simply copying whatever you saw on the screen, the fun always ends when friends start throwing out requests for songs you have no idea how to play. So how about you actually learn how to play guitar for real this time?

It’s now possible to learn guitar from home with the Ultimate Beginner to Expert Guitar Lessons Bundle, which is currently on sale for $29. Grab that Gibson, Fender, or whatever you have handy, and learn to strum rhythms from scratch.

The strumming course will teach you how to count beats and rests to turn your hands and fingers into the perfect accompaniment for your own voice or other musicians. Then, you can take things a step further and learn advanced jamming and soloing to riff anytime, anywhere. This course will teach you to improvise across various chords and progressions so you can jump into any jam with something original. You’ll also have the chance to dive deep into the major guitar genres of bluegrass, blues, and jazz. Lessons in jam etiquette, genre history, and how to read music will separate you from a novice player.

This bundle also includes courses in ear training so you can properly identify any relative note, interval, or pitch. That way, you can play along with any song when it comes on, or even understand how to modify it into the key you’d prefer. And when the time comes to perform, be prepared with skilled hammer-ons, pull-offs, slides, bends, trills, vibrato, and fret-tapping. Not only will you learn the basic foundations of guitar, you’ll ultimately be able to develop your own style with the help of these lessons.

The Ultimate Beginner to Expert Guitar Lessons Bundle is discounted for a limited time. Act on this $29 offer now to work on those fingertip calluses and play like a pro.

 

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A Prehistoric Great White Shark Nursery Has Been Discovered in Chile

Great white sharks used prehistoric nurseries to protect their young.
Great white sharks used prehistoric nurseries to protect their young.
solarseven/iStock via Getty Images

Great white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) may be one of the most formidable and frightening apex predators on the planet today, but life for them isn’t as easy as horror movies would suggest. Due to a slow growth rate and the fact that they produce few offspring, the species is listed as vulnerable to extinction.

There is a way these sharks ensure survival, and that is by creating nurseries—a designated place where great white shark babies (called pups) are protected from other predators. Now, researchers at the University of Vienna and colleagues have discovered these nurseries occurred in prehistoric times.

In a study published in the journal Scientific Reports, Jamie A. Villafaña from the university’s Institute of Palaeontology describes a fossilized nursery found in Coquimbo, Chile. Researchers were examining a collection of fossilized great white shark teeth between 5 and 2 million years old along the Pacific coast of Chile and Peru when they noticed a disproportionate number of young shark teeth in Coquimbo. There was also a total lack of sexually mature animals' teeth, which suggests the site was used primarily by pups and juveniles as a nursery.

Though modern great whites are known to guard their young in designated areas, the researchers say this is the first example of a paleo-nursery. Because the climate was much warmer when the paleo-nursery was in use, the researchers think these protective environments can deepen our understanding of how great white sharks can survive global warming trends.