Which 'Should I ...' Question Is Your State Googling?

iStock.com/Erikona
iStock.com/Erikona

Whether you're about to make an important life decision or you're considering changing your appearance, you may ask Google to weigh in before moving forward. People around the country are guilty of asking the search engine subjective "should I" questions, but the subjects people are searching for vary by state.

For the map below, the analysts at the AT&T retailer All Home Connections used autocomplete to determine the most common Google search queries starting with the words "Should I ..." From there, they looked at the Google Trends data from the past year to break down the popularity of each question in all 50 states.

"Should I vote?" was one of the top searches, ranking most popular in seven states. People throughout the U.S. are also Googling health and diet-related questions, with "should I fast?", "should I lose weight?", and "should I diet?" each cropping up in multiple states. While some states are concerned with relatively minor questions, like "should I buy Bitcoin?" and "should I text him?", others are using Google to make potentially life-changing moves. "Should I break up with my boyfriend?," "should I have a baby?," and "should I buy a house?" all came out on top in at least one state.

This map represents just a fraction of what Americans are typing into Google. You can also check out the health symptoms, state-specific questions, and general topics people are searching for where you live.

Looking to Downsize? You Can Buy a 5-Room DIY Cabin on Amazon for Less Than $33,000

Five rooms of one's own.
Five rooms of one's own.
Allwood/Amazon

If you’ve already mastered DIY houses for birds and dogs, maybe it’s time you built one for yourself.

As Simplemost reports, there are a number of house kits that you can order on Amazon, and the Allwood Avalon Cabin Kit is one of the quaintest—and, at $32,990, most affordable—options. The 540-square-foot structure has enough space for a kitchen, a bathroom, a bedroom, and a sitting room—and there’s an additional 218-square-foot loft with the potential to be the coziest reading nook of all time.

You can opt for three larger rooms if you're willing to skip the kitchen and bathroom.Allwood/Amazon

The construction process might not be a great idea for someone who’s never picked up a hammer, but you don’t need an architectural degree to tackle it. Step-by-step instructions and all materials are included, so it’s a little like a high-level IKEA project. According to the Amazon listing, it takes two adults about a week to complete. Since the Nordic wood walls are reinforced with steel rods, the house can withstand winds up to 120 mph, and you can pay an extra $1000 to upgrade from double-glass windows and doors to triple-glass for added fortification.

Sadly, the cool ceiling lamp is not included.Allwood/Amazon

Though everything you need for the shell of the house comes in the kit, you will need to purchase whatever goes inside it: toilet, shower, sink, stove, insulation, and all other furnishings. You can also customize the blueprint to fit your own plans for the space; maybe, for example, you’re going to use the house as a small event venue, and you’d rather have two or three large, airy rooms and no kitchen or bedroom.

Intrigued? Find out more here.

[h/t Simplemost]

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Afternoon Map: The Most Endangered Plant in Each State

American globeflower
American globeflower
Chelmicky, iStock via Getty Images

Conversations about the groups most threatened by human development and climate change usually focus on animals, but plants may be even more vulnerable. An analysis from last year estimates the number of plants that have disappeared since 1750 is double than that of all birds, mammals, and amphibians combined. Plants are a vital part of the food chain, and as more of them go extinct, it could have catastrophic ripple effects across ecosystems.

To draw attention to this issue, the online loan provider NetCredit has illustrated a map of the most endangered plant species in each state. To create the map, they looked at data from the United States Department of Agriculture and found species that were either endangered or threatened on the federal or state level. From there, they selected plants that were unique-looking, had an interesting history, or had a limited range.

The result is a colorful graphic that demonstrates the diversity of threatened species in the plant kingdom. The map includes colorful flowers, like the dragon's mouth of Rhode Island and the American globeflower of Ohio. Other plants look more aggressive like the Nichol's Echinocactus that's under threat in Arizona. Two carnivorous pitcher plants make the list: the Jones's pitcher plant in North Carolina and the canebrake pitcher plant in Alabama.

You can view the full illustrated map below. To see which endangered animal is native to your state, check out this tool.

NetCredit