It 'Rained' Spiders in Brazil Last Week—and You Can Watch It If You Dare

iStock.com/aury1979
iStock.com/aury1979

If recent events are anything to go by, you should be less concerned about swallowing spiders in your sleep and more concerned about bird-eating spiders raining down on your head. As The Guardian reports, recent footage from the Brazilian countryside shows thousands of spiders seemingly suspended in mid-air. (Arachnophobes might want to give the video below a miss.)

In reality, they aren’t falling at all. The spiders, which likely belong to a South American species called Parawixia bistriata, are merely crawling on an ultra-fine and nearly invisible web that attaches to two objects, like trees or bushes, to form a canopy.

So why do they do it? To catch prey, naturally. They’re likely to snag a variety of insects and maybe even small birds in their communal web, which can stretch up to 13 feet wide. (And yes, they eat the birds, too.)

Brazilian biology professor Adalberto dos Santos tells The Guardian that P. bistriata are some of the rare “social” spiders that do this. They leave their webs up overnight, hide out in the nearby vegetation, and then return at dawn to feast.

While this natural phenomenon is certainly unsettling, it isn’t exactly rare. Residents of the southeast municipality of Espírito Santo do Dourado, where the video was shot, said these “spider rains” are common when the weather is hot and humid.

Here’s another video from Santo Antônio da Platina in southern Brazil in 2013.

Other species of spider have been known to jump into the wind and "surf" on strands of silk as a means of getting around. They do this to escape threats or get to food or mates in other locations, and cases of "spider flight" have been recorded all over the world. Some especially adventurous spiders have even been known to cross oceans by “ballooning” their way from one land mass to the next.

[h/t The Guardian]

20 Weird Clubs That Actually Exist

Mental Floss via YouTube
Mental Floss via YouTube

Groucho Marx once famously quipped that he'd never "want to belong to any club that would accept me as one of its members." Most people would probably say the same about the Martin-Baker Ejection Tie Club—a very exclusive, 63-year-old organization created specifically for individuals who have had their lives saved by an ejection seat. Currently, the club boasts more than 6000 members.

That's just one of the weird and wonderful clubs you'll learn about in our latest edition of The List Show. Join Mental Floss editor-in-chief Erin McCarthy as she hunts down the world's most unusual clubs (Extreme Ironing Bureau anyone?). You can watch the full video below.

For more episodes like this one, be sure to subscribe here!

Video Captures Fiery Eruption of Mexico's Popocatépetl Volcano

RobertoVaca, iStock via Getty Images
RobertoVaca, iStock via Getty Images

Mexico is home to 48 active volcanoes, but few can compete with Popocatépetl. Located around 40 miles southeast of Mexico City, it's one of the most active volcanoes in the country, and on January 9, the extent of its power was caught on camera.

The video above, reported by NPR, shows the Popocatépetl stratovolcano—also known as a composite volcano—spewing lava, ash, and rock in a fiery plume that reached 20,000 feet above its cinder cone crater. CENAPRED, Mexico's National Center for Disaster Prevention, filmed the volcanic eruption as it unfolded early Thursday morning. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration also recorded the explosion from space using its GOES 16 satellite.

No one was hurt by the incident last week, but CENAPRED is warning people to avoid the area as debris continues to fall from the summit. The center has set its Volcanic Warning Light to Yellow Phase 2, which indicates there's no immediate threat of danger.

Since it emerged from dormancy in 1994, Popocatépetl, or "El Popo," as it's known by locals, has become one of the most active volcanoes in Mexico. Tremors and showers of ash are now regular occurrences for residents of nearby towns. Given its volatility, there are currently 20 devices monitoring the volcano 24/7.

[h/t NPR]

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