The Oxford English Dictionary Wants You to Share Your Profession's Slang Terms

iStock.com/Massonstock
iStock.com/Massonstock

The Oxford English Dictionary has been around for 135 years as of February 1, 2019, and the list of terms it recognizes keeps expanding. OED editors are always searching for new words like binge-watch, bromance, and mochaccino to add to the book as they solidify their spots in the lexicon. For a new project, they're calling on their readers to help, The Guardian reports.

If your profession uses slang terms that might be indecipherable to the general public, OED wants to hear about them. Maybe you're an anesthesiologist who uses the Woolworth's Test to determine if a patient can undergo anesthesia (if the patient seems well enough to go shopping at the retail store, they should be OK), or a trucker driver who cruises at a double nickel (55 mph). The dictionary is accepting any suggestions—no matter how obscure.

OED writes on its website that while some professional jargon is meant to keep clients in the dark, others can lead to communication problems: "You'd probably rather not hear your doctor describe someone as a gomer [get out of my emergency room] (that is, a difficult or disagreeable patient), and your veterinary friend may shy away from explaining DSTO (our sources tell us that it means 'dog smarter than owner'). However, at other times, not understanding the words used in a trade just leads to confusion. Not everyone knows, for instance, that sweating the pipes is plumbing slang for soldering two pipes together."

The Oxford English Dictionary is calling on doctors, journalists, teachers, firefighters, and everyone else to share their secret terminology. Some professionals are sharing their contributions on Twitter: Suggestions so far include banana (to walk in a curve, not a straight line, on stage), weed (to remove damaged or unpopular books from a library's inventory), and caped (railway term for a canceled train).

To submit your term directly to OED, you can fill out the form here.

[h/t The Guardian]

Amazon Customers Are Swearing by a $102 Mattress

Linenspa
Linenspa

Before you go out and spend hundreds—if not thousands—of dollars on a new mattress, you may want to turn to Amazon. According to Esquire, one of the most comfortable mattresses on the market isn’t from Tempur-Pedic, Casper, or IKEA. It’s a budget mattress you can buy on Amazon for as little as $102.

Linenspa's 8-inch memory foam and innerspring hybrid mattress has more than 24,000 customer reviews on Amazon, and 72 percent of those buyers gave it five stars. The springs are topped by memory foam and a quilted top layer that make it, according to one customer, a “happy medium of both firm and plush.”

Linenspa

Perhaps because of its cheap price point, many people write that they first purchased it for their children or their guest room, only to find that it far exceeded their comfort expectations. One reviewer who bought it for a guest room wrote that “it is honestly more comfortable than the expensive mattress we bought for our room.” Pretty impressive for a bed that costs less than some sheet sets.

Getting a good night's sleep is vital for your health and happiness, so do yourself a favor and make sure your snooze is as comfortable as possible.

The mattress starts at $102 for a twin and goes up to $200 for a king. Check it out on Amazon.

[h/t Esquire]

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

Seniors in a North Carolina Assisted Living Facility Are Looking for Pen Pals

Seniors in nursing homes are hoping to develop new friendships with pen pals.
Seniors in nursing homes are hoping to develop new friendships with pen pals.
MichaelShivers/iStock via Getty Images

Although coronavirus still holds many mysteries for the researchers working to understand it, one thing is certain: Older populations, particularly those in group living facilities, are at high risk of serious complications. Assisted living facilities around the country have largely shied away from allowing visitors, which means residents have little contact with anyone beyond staff.

Victorian Senior Care in North Carolina is looking to change that the old-fashioned way. They’re soliciting pen pals for their residents.

The facility, which has several locations throughout the state, has set up a program for residents looking to correspond with someone. Each person has a photo profile listing their name and interests. Enjoy video games? Then you might like exchanging letters with Robert at The Living Center of Concord. Know about farming and heavy farm equipment? Mr. Tom at The Village of Kingston is your man. Don’t mind an old rascal? Check out Leon at Montgomery Village, who likes “shag dancing” and “loves girls.”

You can find dozens more seniors who have a lot of life experience to share on the Victorian Care Center’s pen pal page. The program is already a success, with over 15,000 letters received to date. One location is even at letter capacity, as all the seniors looking for a new friend at their Phoenix Assisted Care location have a full dance card.

Other care facilities throughout the country are also hoping to match residents with pen pals. Ridgecrest Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center in Forney, Texas, has resident profiles on their Facebook page:

None of these facilities are offering email addresses, which means you’ll have to correspond like pen pals did for centuries—with pen and paper.

[h/t Victorian Senior Care]