Here's How Much Money You Need to Retire Early in Each State

iStock.com/katso80
iStock.com/katso80

If you're complacent with your career, your goals might be limited to grabbing the last office doughnut. But if you have an eye on retirement, you might be wondering how much it's going to take to walk away from the desk forever.

Cost information website How Much has compiled estimates of the savings residents of each state might need in order to retire early at the ages of 35, 45, and 55. The site used figures from GoBankingRates that looked at the cost of living in the various regions and then estimated annual expenses based on age with an average 4 percent withdrawal rate annually.

If you wanted to retire at age 35 in Ohio, for example, having $1.61 million in your savings account would be ideal. In California, you’d need $2.37 million.

An infographic shows how much money is needed to retire at age 35 in each state
howmuch

An infographic shows how much money is needed to retire by age 45 in each state
howmuch

An infographic shows how much money is needed to retire by age 55 in each state
howmuch

The site cautions that this is an oversimplification of what should be some highly individualized financial planning. Everyone has different needs, and the numbers don't account for inflation or for adjusting the 4 percent annual withdrawal. In short, this is nothing you should pass along to your accountant. What these charts can do, however, is spark motivation to make your own plans for having a comfortable retirement. If you want to spend it in Hawaii, it might be best to start saving now.

[h/t Thrillist]

The One-Day Record Snowfalls In Each State

Greenseas/iStock via Getty Images
Greenseas/iStock via Getty Images

Long after you’ve grown out of believing in magic, every thick, whirling snowstorm still seems to have been cast upon your town by a winter warlock (or Frozen’s resident ice queen, Elsa).

It’s also pretty magical when those inches of stacked snowflakes add up to a message from your manager telling you not to come into the office. In southern states like Georgia or Florida, sometimes all it takes is a light dusting.

But even those characteristically balmy places have hosted some serious snowstorms over the years, and David Cusick for House Method crunched the numbers to find out which ones made the record books. Using data from the National Centers for Environmental Information, Cusick created a map showing the one-day record snowfall for each state.

Florida finished in last place with a scant total of 4 inches, which occurred in Santa Rosa County on March 6, 1954. About two years before that, on January 14, 1952, Colorado had a staggering 76 inches—that’s more than 3 inches per hour—a national record that’s remained unchallenged for nearly 70 years.

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But other states have come close. The snowstorm that hit Colorado in 1952 wreaked almost as much havoc in California, whose record from the same day was 75 inches. And Washington saw 70 inches of snow in November 1955, beating its 52-inch record from 1935 by a full 18 inches.

Though Midwestern states have gained a reputation for harsh, snowy winters, their one-day record snowfalls are surprisingly moderate. The Illinois and Indiana records are 24 and 26 inches, respectively, both slightly lower than Ohio’s 30-inch snow day from 1901. In 1993, North Carolina bested Ohio’s record by 6 inches.

Wondering how your individual county’s record compares to the overall state one? Cusick created a map for that, too, which you can explore below.

Made with Flourish

[h/t House Method]

Google Home vs. Alexa: Which Smart Device Does Your State Prefer?

Todd Williamson, Getty Images
Todd Williamson, Getty Images

If you're thinking of buying a loved one a smart home device for the holidays, you're likely considering two options: Google Home ($70)—a series of smart speakers from the tech giant—and Amazon Echo ($80)—which features the virtual voice assistant Alexa. You could do hours of research weighing the pros and cons of each gadget, or you could pick one based on where your giftee lives. The map below from ASecureLife.com breaks down where each state falls in the Google Home versus Alexa debate.

Map of Google Home vs. Alexa searches.
ASecureLife.com

To create the graphic, the home security company analyzed Google trends data related to searches for Google Home and Amazon Alexa in October 2019. The two terms are fairly evenly matched: Google Home just edges out Alexa with 51 percent of the total search volume nationwide compared to Alex's 49 percent.

The two devices are also spread out across the map. On the West Coast, California and Washington prefer Google, while Oregon likes Alexa. In the South, Alexa dominates Florida, Alabama, and North Carolina, while Google takes Mississippi, Georgia, and Tennessee. New England is split between the two: Google wins New Hampshire, Connecticut, and Massachusetts, and Alexa tops searches in Maine, Rhode Island, and Vermont. You can check out the full map above.

Google Home and Amazon Echo share a lot of the same capabilities, like connecting with the internet and other devices to set the thermostat, turn off the lights, play music, and answer questions. If your home state's search trends aren't enough to convince you to choose one over the other, you may have to look at more obscure details, such as which one is better at understanding accents and which has the best jokes.

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