This Service Will Deal With the Logistical Side of Your Breakup for $99

iStock.com/LightFieldStudios
iStock.com/LightFieldStudios

In the aftermath of a breakup, it can be hard to do anything but watch sad movies and eat ice cream in bed. But your broken heart isn't the only thing that needs attention when a relationship ends: If you shared a living space with your ex, you'll also have to deal with finding a different place to live, moving out, and furnishing your new space. Fortunately, the newly single don't have to navigate this process alone. As Fast Company reports, Onward is a new concierge service based in New York City that handles the practical aspects of a breakup so you can focus on recovery.

Onward wants clients to see breaking up as an opportunity to start a new phase of life, and to get you started on that path, they begin by finding you a new, temporary place to live. The service has connections with furnished, short-term rental options in the city that are ready for new tenants. The utilities and paperwork have already been figured out for you, so all you need to worry about is moving in. Onward will send over packers and movers to help you move out of your old place and move on with your life as quickly as possible.

If you're having trouble processing your emotions after a breakup, Onward offers support in that area as well. Instead of weeding through tons of therapists on your own, the service narrows down your options to one to three vetted mental health professionals within your insurance network in just 24 hours. A 10-day package from Onward, which includes housing placement, packing, moving, and mental healthcare search assistance, starts at $99.

Onward's services couldn't come at a better time—the number of U.S. adults in cohabiting relationships rose from 14 million to 18 million between 2007 and 2016. That means many couples who break up have to deal with the same complications of divorce without the legal guidance. And finding a new place to live can be expensive, which keeps many people from moving on: According to one survey, 28 percent of people cite financial security as a reason for staying with their current partner.

Services like Onward can not only help the recently dumped, but also those who have been putting off pulling the plug on an unsatisfying relationship. You can sign up for their service after answering a few questions on their website.

[h/t Fast Company]

Learn Travel Blogging, Novel Writing, Editing, and More With This $30 Creative Writing Course Bundle

Centre of Excellence
Centre of Excellence

It seems like everyone is a writer lately, from personal blog posts to lengthy Instagram captions. How can your unique ideas stand out from the clutter? These highly reviewed courses in writing for travel blogs, novel writing, and even self-publishing are currently discounted and will teach you just that. The Ultimate Creative Writing Course Bundle is offering 10 courses for $29.99, which are broken down into 422 bite-sized lessons to make learning manageable and enjoyable.

Access your inner poet or fiction writer and learn to create compelling works of literature from home. Turn that passion into a business through courses that teach the basics of setting up, hosting, and building a blog. Then, the social media, design, and SEO lessons will help distinguish your blog.

Once you perfect your writing, the next challenge is getting that writing seen. While the bundle includes lessons in social media and SEO, it also includes a self-publishing course to take things into your own hands to see your work in bookshops. You’ll learn to keep creative control and royalties with lessons on the basics of production, printing, proofreading, distribution, and marketing efforts. The course bundle also includes lessons in freelance writing that teach how to make a career working from home.

If you’re more of an artistic writer, the calligraphy course will perfect your classical calligraphy scripts to confidently shape the thick and thin strokes of each letter. While it can definitely be a therapeutic hobby, it’s also a great side-hustle. Create your own designs and make some extra cash selling them as wedding placards or wall art.

Take your time perfecting your craft with lifetime access to the 10 courses included in The Ultimate Creative Writing Course Bundle. At the discounted price of $29.99, you’ll have spent more money on the coffee you’re sipping while you write your next novel than the courses themselves.

 

The Ultimate Creative Writing Course Bundle - $29.99

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The Best Way to Defer Your Credit Card Payments During the Coronavirus Shutdown, Explained

Credit card companies can offer financial assistance, but there can be drawbacks.
Credit card companies can offer financial assistance, but there can be drawbacks.
alexialex/iStock via Getty Images

A number of financial relief options are available to Americans who have been affected by the unprecedented health situation created by the spread of the coronavirus. Mortgage companies are offering forbearances; insurance companies have lowered premiums for cars that aren’t being driven. Credit card companies have also acknowledged that cardholders may have trouble keeping up with their bills. While many companies are eager to help with debt and interest, there are some things you should know before picking up the phone.

The good news: If you’re unable to make your minimum monthly payment in a given month, major card issuers like Chase, Capital One, and others are willing to grant a forbearance. That means you can skip the minimum due without being hit with a negative strike on your credit report for a missed payment.

A forbearance is no free ride. Interest will still accrue as normal, and the card issuer may consider the missed payment deferred, not waived. If you pay $50 monthly, for example, and are able to skip a May payment, make sure the card won't expect a $100 minimum in June to cover both months. Ask the company to define forbearance so you know what’s expected. Some may be willing to lower your minimum payment instead, which could be a better option for you.

While the skipped payment won’t impact your FICO credit score directly, be aware that it could still have consequences. Because many minimum payments mainly cover interest, your balance won’t remain the same—it will continue to grow. And because that interest is still adding up, your total amount owed is still going up relative to your available credit, which can affect your score.

If you have a sizable amount due, the National Foundation for Credit Counseling (NFCC) recommends looking into alternatives to forbearance, like using savings to pay down some high-interest cards, taking advantage of zero-interest balance transfer offers, or even taking out a personal loan with a lower interest rate.

If you have multiple credit card balances and the prospect of trying to get through to a human to discuss payment options seems daunting, the NFCC is offering their assistance. The agency can put you in touch with a credit counselor who can act on your behalf, obtaining forbearances or other relief from the card companies. Be advised, though, that card issuers may want to get your permission to deal with the counselors directly. The program is free and you can reach the NFCC via their website.

Be mindful that emergency relief is different from a debt management plan, which consolidates debt and can have a negative impact on your credit card accounts.

In many cases, the best thing to do is to pick up the phone and deal with the card issuer directly. Explain your situation and ask about what options they have. Some might waive payments. Others might offer to lower your interest rate. No two card issuers are alike, and it’s in your best interest to take the time to see what’s available.

[h/t lifehacker]