The 15 Best Comic Book Movies to Stream Right Now

Marvel Studios 2018
Marvel Studios 2018

Superhero movies are ubiquitous, dominating the box office and Blu-ray sales (not to mention this year's awards season) and wrapping up huge swaths of fandom in discussions that last months—or even years—at a time. Streaming services are also ubiquitous, so it makes sense that these two great tastes would taste great together.

If you’re looking for the very best comic book films out there, though, where do you turn? Well, while a great many of the DC Comics-based films in particular have migrated over to the new DC Universe streaming service, and Marvel’s films will likely head to Disney’s upcoming streaming platform in the near future, you can still find some of the very best comic book films on the most popular streaming services. Here are 15 excellent bets (in no particular order).

1. Avengers: Infinity War (2018)

When Marvel promised a comic book film of unprecedented scale with Avengers: Infinity War, they were not messing around. This film, one of 2018’s biggest, was the culmination of a decade of planning, casting, and cinematic storytelling all pulled into one massive movie event. It would be impressive for its ambition and scope alone, but it’s also perhaps the best attempt yet to tell a comic book crossover story on the big screen.

Where to watch it: Netflix

2. Black Panther (2018)

The first superhero film to ever earn an Oscar nomination for Best Picture, Black Panther became not just one of the most successful movies in the history of Marvel Studios in 2018, but a full-blown cultural phenomenon. The film was an instantly quotable, instantly viral sensation, and a year after its release it remains not just an important landmark in the superhero shared universe phenomenon, but a great film that’s unlike anything else in its genre so far. (Though it lost its Best Picture bid, the film did win three of its seven Oscar nominations.)

Where to watch it: Netflix

3. Wonder Woman (2017)

It took far too long for Wonder Woman to finally make it to the big screen, so in some ways this movie was worth watching merely because it existed at all. That it turned out to be this good was almost a bonus, but Wonder Woman became so much more as millions of fans finally got to see it. Director Patty Jenkins and star Gal Gadot made the best film in the DC Extended Universe so far, proving that Diana of Themyscira didn’t need the Justice League around her to become a star.

Where to watch it: HBO Go

4. The Dark Knight (2008)

Still considered by some fans to be the best Batman movie, and even the best superhero movie, ever made, the middle installment of Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight trilogy still holds up more than a decade after its initial release. Heath Ledger’s Oscar-winning performance as The Joker remains wicked fun, and the film’s car chases are still among the most dizzying practical effects ever pulled off in a superhero flick.

Where to watch it: Netflix

5. Watchmen (2009)

Before HBO enters the superhero game with its own new spin on the classic miniseries by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, it might be worth revisiting director Zack Snyder’s adaptation of one of the most important and influential comic books ever published. Is the film a lavish and devoted exploration of Watchmen’s superhero deconstruction, or is it an overly elaborate fan film that’s a little too devoted to the source material to be interesting as a work of art in its own right? Either way,Watchmen remains a fascinating entry in superhero movie history.

Where to watch it: Netflix

6. Hellboy (2004)

Before he was the Oscar-winning director of The Shape of Water, Guillermo del Toro tried his hand at a comic book adaptation, and he did it with one of the most Guillermo del Toro-esque superheroes out there: A demon (played wonderful by Ron Perlman) who hunts monsters. A reboot is on its way later this year, but the original Hellboy is still delightfully pulpy supernatural fun.

Where to watch it: Netflix

7. Hellboy II: The Golden Army (2008)

Yes, both Hellboy films are on this list, because both Hellboy films are just that good, for very different reasons. Del Toro’s first Hellboy film is a monster-hunting pulp adventure, but for its sequel everything heads into the realm of pure fantasy, as Hellboy and his friends learn of an ancient conflict and Big Red himself moves closer to his destiny. A word of warning, though: This film will make you sad that Del Toro never got to make the third film in his series.

Where to watch it: Hulu

8. The Crow (1994)

Long before superheroes on the big screen became a part of shared universes and billion dollar mega-franchises, The Crow became what is perhaps the ultimate Generation X comic book movie: the story of an aspiring rock star (Brandon Lee) who is murdered by thugs on Devil’s Night, and returns from the dead one year later as a supernatural vigilante to seek his vengeance. Director Alex Proyas’s visuals are gothic perfection, and the film’s soundtrack alone is worth the price of admission.

Where to watch it: Netflix

9. Scott Pilgrim vs. The World (2010)

A rare adaptation for writer/director Edgar Wright brings Bryan Lee O’Malley’s popular graphic novel series to life. Michael Cera is perfectly cast in the title role as an awkward young man who is determined to win the heart of the woman he loves (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) by literally winning video game style battles against her “Seven Evil Exes.” Wright throws every trick in his book at the screen, and the result is a film you can watch again and again.

Where to watch it: Netflix

10. Thor: Ragnarok (2017)

In terms of ambition and pure entertainment value, the Thor films were lagging behind Marvel’s other franchises ... until Ragnarok came along. Directed by the madcap genius Taika Waititi (What We Do In the Shadows), the film takes Thor (Chris Hemsworth, making a strong case for himself as the funniest Avenger) out of his element and into a new world where he must fight for his life, his freedom, and the future of his people. It’s one of Marvel’s funniest films, yes, but also one of its most visually and thematically ambitious.

Where to watch it: Netflix

11. The Adventures of Tintin (2011)

The legendary Tintin stories by Belgian cartoonist Herge got a big screen treatment for the ages in 2011, with a production team that included Steven Spielberg in the director’s chair, Peter Jackson as a producer, and a screenplay from Steven Moffat, Edgar Wright, and Joe Cornish. The film was not a runaway hit on the scale of other comic book films, or even other animated blockbusters. But it’s worth watching just to see how far Spielberg takes the motion capture imagery into the realm of pure adventure.

Where to watch it: Prime Video

12. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017)

Writer/director James Gunn might not have topped his first Guardians of the Galaxy outing with this ambitious and even more ensemble-laden sequel, but he comes damn close. Like the first film, the second Guardians installment is packed with memorable jokes, glorious action set pieces, and a soundtrack that just won’t quit. Oh, and one place where it definitely does top the first film is with its emotional ending, so have some tissues ready after all the laughs.

Where to watch it: Netflix

13. I Kill Giants (2017)

If superheroes aren’t what you’re looking for, and you’re also looking for a film that hasn’t been seen as widely as it should, consider this fantasy drama based on the acclaimed Image Comics series of the same name. The story of a teenage girl who’s obsession with Dungeons and Dragons had led her to believe she must battle real giants invading her world, it’s a wonderfully imaginative battle cry for outsider kids.

Where to watch it: Hulu

14. Logan (2017)

Hugh Jackman’s curtain call as Wolverine proved that superhero films don’t need massive budgets, massive casts, or even world-destroying villains to be hits. It also proved superhero films don’t need to follow formulas to be masterpieces, because superhero comics don’t have to either. Jackman’s beautiful performance as a dying version of the legendary mutant is matched only by Sir Patrick Stewart’s turn as a dying Charles Xavier. It’s the perfect sendoff for the man who defined superhero stardom in the 2000s, well before Robert Downey Jr. ever put on his Iron Man armor.

Where to watch it: HBO Go

15. KICK-ASS (2010)

Writer/director Matthew Vaughn’s first adaptation of the works of comic book writer Mark Millar (who also co-created the comics behind the Kingsman film series) came with this dark comedy about what would happen if ordinary people put on costumes, gave themselves cool names, and went out to fight crime. You’ll laugh through virtually every minute, even when you might feel a little dirty for it.

Where to watch it: Prime Video

K-Swiss Has Cooked Up an Entire Line of Breaking Bad Sneakers

Breaking Bad lives on in sneaker form.
Breaking Bad lives on in sneaker form.
K-Swiss

Breaking Bad has been off the air for nearly seven years, but there’s no sign that AMC’s breakthrough drama is showing any hints of slowing down. On the heels of their success with a limited-edition Breaking Bad sneaker in October 2019, K-Swiss has returned to the seedy underbelly of Albuquerque, New Mexico, with an entire line of shoes.

The company announced a joint venture with Sony Pictures Consumer Products for three new sneakers based on the popular drug-running series starring Bryan Cranston as Walter White, a chemistry teacher-turned-unlikely drug kingpin. All of the K-Swiss x Breaking Bad Classic 2000 varieties are based on the K-Swiss Classic 2000 low-top design and take inspiration from different elements of the show.

The Cooking shoe has a yellow color scheme that takes after the protective suits worn by Walter and Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul) during meth cooks. K-Swiss will make 1144 pairs available:

The K-Swiss x 'Breaking Bad' Classic 2000 Cooking sneaker is pictured
The K-Swiss x Breaking Bad Classic 2000 Cooking sneaker.
K-Swiss

The Cleaning shoe (1162 pairs) is patterned after the jumpers worn by the two during the cleaning of their elaborate underground lab built by drug lord Gus Fring (Giancarlo Esposito):

The K-Swiss x 'Breaking Bad' Classic 2000 Cleaning sneaker is pictured
The K-Swiss x Breaking Bad Classic 2000 Cleaning sneaker.
K-Swiss

The Recreational Vehicle design, with a stripe that looks like the exterior of White’s mobile meth laboratory, resembles the October 2019 shoe release. K-Swiss will make 1396 pairs available:

The K-Swiss x 'Breaking Bad' Classic 2000 Recreational Vehicle sneaker is pictured
The K-Swiss x Breaking Bad Classic 2000 Recreational Vehicle sneaker.
K-Swiss

The Cooking and Cleaning shoes have “Heisenberg,” Walter’s alias, written on the sole:

The K-Swiss x 'Breaking Bad' Classic 2000 Cooking sneaker sole with 'Heisenberg' printed on it is pictured
The K-Swiss x Breaking Bad Classic 2000 Cooking and Cleaning sneakers have 'Heisenberg' printed on the sole.
K-Swiss

All the sneakers come packaged in a Breaking Bad periodic table box. Men’s sizes retail for $80 to $90. No women’s sizes have been announced. You can find them in limited quantities online at KSwiss.com, FootLocker.com, Footaction.com, and ChampsSports.com beginning February 20.

8 Surprising Facts About Andy Kaufman

Andy Kaufman in 1981.
Andy Kaufman in 1981.
Joan Adlen, Getty Images

For fans of the late comedian Andy Kaufman (1949-1984), the debate over whether Kaufman was more interested in antagonizing audiences or making them laugh still rages. During a career that saw him appear on stage and on television (Taxi), the performer often blurred the lines between his real persona and the characters he inhabited.

For more on Kaufman, keep reading. Thank you very much.

1. Andy Kaufman got a letter from his doctor that kept him from being drafted.

Born in New York City on January 17, 1949, Kaufman was raised in Great Neck, Long Island and displayed an interest in performing from an early age, entertaining children at their birthday parties when Kaufman himself was only 8 years old. After graduating from high school in 1967, Kaufman though he might be drafted for military service but didn’t wind up serving. His doctor wrote a letter explaining that Kaufman seemed to have no basic grasp of reality, let alone the Vietnam conflict. Joining the Army, the doctor wrote, might cause Kaufman to completely lose his mind. The letter, which likely contained a good measure of hyperbole, earned him a permanent 4-F deferment from service. He went on to attend Grahm Junior College in Boston.

2. Andy Kaufman’s stand-up act was very, very bizarre.

Kaufman got his start in the early 1970s performing at comedy clubs in New York and Los Angeles. Unlike most comics of the time, Kaufman didn’t write a conventionally-structured act. Instead, he would take on the role of performance artist, confusing audiences with stunts like reading from The Great Gatsby and threatening to start over if they complained. He would also drag a sleeping bag on stage and climb into it or do his laundry with a portable dryer. These appearances were sufficiently provocative that Kaufman sometimes hired off-duty police officers to break up fights in the crowd or intercept people trying to attack him.

3. Andy Kaufman once opened for Barry Manilow.

Before Kaufman got television exposure, it was easy for bookers to assume he was a polished and conventional performer. As a result, Kaufman got a number of gigs in the early 1970s opening for established musical acts like the Temptations and Barry Manilow. Appearing onstage in 1972 before the Temptations came out, Kaufman wept and then shot himself in the head with a cap gun. Similarly bizarre behavior was also displayed before a Manilow concert, with irate members of the audience having to be calmed down by Manilow himself.

4. Andy Kaufman was once voted off of Saturday Night Live.

Kaufman succeeded in drawing attention to himself on stage, which led to being invited to perform on Saturday Night Live beginning in 1975. During these appearances, Kaufman would take material from his act, including his lip-syncing of the theme to the Mighty Mouse animated series. Such stunts drew a mixed reception from viewers. From 1975 to 1982, Kaufman made a total of 14 appearances on the show. Then, producers decided to offer viewers the chance to “vote” Kaufman off by calling in to cast their ballot. On the November 20, 1982 broadcast, 195,544 callers asked that the show not permit him to come back on. They outnumbered the 169,186 viewers who called in support of him. While the bit was intended to be humorous, Kaufman honored the results and never appeared on Saturday Night Live again.

5. Andy Kaufman once took his entire audience out for milk and cookies.

Kaufman eventually took his show to Carnegie Hall in 1979, where he was greeted by 2800 people who had come to appreciate his eccentric approach to performing. At the show's conclusion, he invited the entire audience to board buses waiting outside the building. Kaufman took them to the New York School of Printing in Manhattan, where he served the nearly 3000 attendees milk and cookies. He later gave them a ride on the Staten Island Ferry.

6. Andy Kaufman thought about franchising Tony Clifton.

One of Kaufman’s great ruses on the public was dressing as the abrasive lounge singer Tony Clifton, complete with prosthetic chin and torso padding, all while insisting Clifton was an entirely different person. Kaufman sometimes enlisted associates, including his brother Michael and his writing partner Bob Zmuda, to put on the make-up. In 2013, Michael told Vice that Kaufman’s plan was to have Clifton become a roving character. “Andy had been talking about franchising Tony Clifton before he died,” Michael Kaufman said. “He was going to have one in every state.”

7. Andy Kaufman insisted on an Andy Kaufman stand-in for Taxi.

When Kaufman agreed to appear on Taxi (1978-1983) as Latka Gravas, a version of the “Foreign Man” character he had been performing on stage, he had a peculiar request: He wanted to be expected on set for only two of the five shooting days for each episode. While Kaufman didn’t seem to want to do it at all, the paycheck allowed him to pursue his more experimental brand of comedy. Producers agreed. In 2018, co-star Carol Kane, who played Kaufman's love interest, told The Hollywood Reporter that the cast “would work with a fake Andy who wore a sign around his neck that said ‘Latka.’”

Kaufman also showed up to shoot an episode as his alter ego Tony Clifton, insisting that he was not Kaufman. Star Judd Hirsch got so angry that he had Clifton thrown off the set.

8. Andy Kaufman broke character for Orson Welles.

While there were certainly times Kaufman spoke from the heart, it was rare to see him break any one of his myriad characters in front of an audience. That happened—fleetingly—when Kaufman appeared on The Merv Griffin Show in 1982 on a night it was being guest-hosted by legendary film director Orson Welles. Sporting a neck brace from his stint in professional wrestling, Kaufman didn’t keep up appearances for long. After Welles told him he was “fascinated” by his characters, talk turned to Kaufman’s “Foreign Man,” his Elvis Presley imitation, and his “third character,” Tony Clifton. “Well, he wasn’t a character,” Kaufman said, correcting himself. “There’s a lot of debate over whether it’s a character or a real guy, and that’s Tony Clifton, but that’s a whole other story.”

“That’s metaphysics,” Welles replied.

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