Test Your Color Perception Skills (and See How They Stack Up Against Your Fellow Humans)

iStock.com/scyther5
iStock.com/scyther5

Being able to perceive a wide spectrum of colors takes more than great eyesight. Your color perception depends on several factors, including your color vocabulary, your home country, and the languages you speak. That's part of why two people can look at the same image of a dress and see completely different color schemes.

To test how your color perception stacks up against the rest of the population, take the free color test from Lenstore UK below. You'll be given a series of tasks, such as identifying the lightest shade of a certain color, matching two identical shades, and filling in a gradient color pattern with the missing hue. After answering 10 questions, the test tells you how many you got right.

Don't be too upset if you didn't do as well as you had hoped: Less than 1 percent of the 2000 people Lenstore surveyed scored a perfect 10 out of 10. The most common score was 6 out of 10, with 24.1 percent of respondents getting this result.

Lenstore also found that test results varied by demographic: Typically, women perceive colors better than men, and elderly people perceive them more poorly than younger adults (color perception peaks in both men and women in their early 30s). When breaking down the data by country, people from Cyprus came out on top, with an average test score of 6.6 out of 10. Additionally, speaking two or more languages boosted the test-taker's chances of earning a higher score.

The way we talk about color plays a big role in how we perceive it. There are five more base colors in the Japanese language than there are in English, including distinct words for yellow-green and light blue. And scholars have long been puzzled by Homer's description of a "wine-dark" sea in The Odyssey—a possible indication that words to describe dark blue hadn't been invented in that part of the world yet.

One way to potentially improve your color perception is by broadening your color vocabulary. Lenstore's study found that people with a greater knowledge of color names scored higher on the test. You can find some color names you've likely never heard of here.

The Smithsonian Needs Your Help Transcribing Sally Ride’s Notebooks

Sally Ride in 1984.
Sally Ride in 1984.
Coffeeandcrumbs, NASA, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

On June 18, 1983, Sally K. Ride made history when she became the first American woman to travel into space. Now, the Smithsonian Institution is making the history of her incredible decades-long career more accessible to everyone—and they need your help to do it.

The National Air and Space Museum Archives is home to the Sally K. Ride Papers, a collection of 38,640 physical pages (over 23 cubic feet) of material spanning Ride’s professional life as an astronaut, physicist, and educator from the 1970s to 2010s. Those resources have been scanned and used to create an online finding aid—not unlike a table of contents—so researchers can easily navigate through the wealth of information.

To simplify the searching process within that online finding aid, the Smithsonian Institution is asking for volunteers to transcribe documents in the Smithsonian’s Transcription Center, a digital hub launched in 2013, where anybody can sign up to type and review historical sources. Three projects from the Sally K. Ride Papers are currently available to transcribe, which include her notes for shuttle training between 1979 and 1981, notes about the Remote Manipulator System Arm (there's one on the International Space Station today), and notes from NASA commissions on which she served. One, for example, was the Rogers Commission, which investigated the causes of the fatal Space Shuttle Challenger disaster in 1986.

You can find out more about the documents in the projects here, and if you’re interested in joining the forces of “volunpeers,” as the Smithsonian likes to call its transcribers, you can create a new user account here. (All you’ll need is a username and email address.)

Check out more citizen science projects you can participate in at home here.

You Could Get Paid $1000 to Host a Remote The Office Watching Party

NBC
NBC

If getting paid to watch The Office sounds like a dream come true, well, you're in luck. Amid the COVID-19 crisis, Overheard on Conference Calls, an online resource that provides helpful guides to navigating the workplace, is paying one diehard fan $1000 to host a remote watch party of The Office.

"In a time when most states in the U.S. are under stay at home orders due to COVID-19 and words like social distancing are common, it can be tough to still remember there are good things out there. Two of those things are friendship and the television show The Office," the company said on their website.

But there are a few important requirements. According to the site, Overheard is looking for someone who loves the show, has accessibility to host a video call, and will watch 15 episodes in the span of one week with their friends.

You also need to be 18 years or older and a current resident of the United States. If you fit all these requirements, simply fill out this form by April 27.

Even if you aren't the lucky winner, you can still host an Office watch party while social distancing. Check out this free browser extension that allows you to watch Netflix with your friends.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER