Here's What Investments in the Early Stock Offerings of Major Companies Would Be Worth Today

iStock.com/pressureUA
iStock.com/pressureUA

If you’re curious about what might have been when it comes to hypothetical stock market investing, a new infographic from the financial website How Much will get your attention. The site looked at the initial public offering, or IPO, of some of the biggest companies in tech and consumer goods over the past decades and how much that investment is worth today. (IPOs signal when stock is released for purchase by the general public.) Here's what they found.

A chart demonstrates the increase in value of stocks for successful companies
How Much

Putting down $100 for shares of McDonald’s when the company went public in 1965 and forgetting about it would have netted you $569,800 today. Even more profitable than fast-service burgers would have been Coca-Cola, although that stock would have had a century to appreciate.

The biggest score—and surprise—is Nike, which manages to deliver the biggest haul since its IPO launched in 1980. Nike stocks traded at just 18 cents a share then but ballooned to over $85 in February 2019. Microsoft was far more valued at the time of its IPO, trading at $21 a share in 1986, but its value has only gone up—a share is now worth $108.22 in 2019.

The site accounted for stocks that were held through falling and rising stock prices, stock splits, and stocks with dividends taken out and not reinvested.

While it may seem like a bit of financial daydreaming, the chart is an intriguing illustration of the brands that have resonated with the public over the years. When Starbucks went public in 1992, some prospective investors believed that selling coffee for the then-outrageous price of $1 per cup with Italian names that many people couldn’t pronounce was ridiculous. For others, believing in the power of the latte paid off.

[h/t Digg]

61 Festive Facts About Thanksgiving

jenifoto/iStock via Getty Images
jenifoto/iStock via Getty Images

From the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade to back-to-back NFL games, there are certain Thanksgiving traditions that you’re probably familiar with, even if your own celebration doesn’t necessarily include them. But how much do you really know about the high-calorie holiday?

To give you a crash course on the history of Thanksgiving and everything we associate with it, WalletHub compiled stats from the U.S. Census Bureau, the American Farm Bureau Association, Harris Poll, and more into one illuminating infographic. Featured facts include the date Abraham Lincoln declared Thanksgiving a national holiday (October 3, 1863) and the percentage of Americans whose favorite dish is turkey (39 percent).

Not only is it interesting to learn how the majority of Americans celebrate the holiday, it also might make you feel better about how your own Thanksgiving usually unfolds. If you’re frantically calling the Butterball Turkey hotline for help on how to cook a giant bird, you’re not alone—the hotline answers more than 100,000 questions in November and December. And you’re in good company if your family forgoes the home-cooked meal altogether, too: 9 percent of Americans head to a restaurant for Thanksgiving dinner.

It’s also a great way to fill in the blanks of your Thanksgiving knowledge. You might know that the president ceremoniously pardons one lucky turkey every year, but do you know which president kicked off the peculiar practice? It was George H.W. Bush, in 1989.

Read on to discover the details of America’s most delicious holiday below, and find out why we eat certain foods on Thanksgiving here.

Thanksgiving-2019-By-The-Numbers

Source: WalletHub

[h/t WalletHub]

That's What She Said: The Best Jokes on The Office by the Numbers

NBC
NBC

The Office, which was first a long-running NBC sitcom and now a perennial Netflix streaming hit, enjoys a loyal fan following thanks to its frequently excruciating scenes of workplace conflict. The staff of paper company Dunder Mifflin's Scranton, Pennsylvania office—led by intellectually impaired Michael Scott (Steve Carell)—often find themselves in a spiral of recurring jokes, including Michael’s tone-deaf expression of “That’s what she said” following virtually any innocuous phrase.

Text marketing service SimpleTexting recently did quite a bit of math to arrive at a definitive count for these mentions. Have a look:

An infographic of 'The Office' from SimpleTexting is pictured
SimpleTexting

As you can see, Michael’s catchphrase was nonexistent in season 1, came on strong in season 2, and reached peak Michael in season 4. The dearth of mentions in seasons 8 and 9 is owed to Carell's departure from the show.

Naturally, Michael was responsible for most of those mentions:

An infographic of 'The Office' from SimpleTexting is pictured
SimpleTexting

Next we see how often characters mention their topics of interest:

An infographic of 'The Office' from SimpleTexting is pictured
SimpleTexting

The site also attempted to determine through dialogue analysis which character was the most positive (David Wallace) and who was most negative (Stanley Hudson). It will not surprise you to learn that Michael spoke twice as many words (146,600) as the second-most talkative character, Dwight Schrute (74,606). You can head over to SimpleTexting to find out more.

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