Louisiana Pulls Back on Creating a Registry for Convicted Animal Abusers

iStock.com/stevedangers
iStock.com/stevedangers

A House bill in Louisiana mandating that people who have been convicted of animal cruelty register on a statewide animal abuser registry won't take affect this year.

According to KLFY in Lafayette, House Bill No. 161 was sponsored by Rep. Robby Carter. The bill would require anyone found guilty of animal abuse to register within seven days and report their name and address. By law, they would then be prohibited from owning an animal for 10 years following the conviction. If they're convicted a second time, they would be prohibited for life.

In theory, the registration would allow adoption agencies like the Humane Society to check potential pet owners against names on the list to make sure no one with a history of harming animals is able to acquire another pet.

The requirement would apply to any resident of Louisiana, even if the crime took place out of state. If someone fails to register, they could faces fines of up to $1000 as well as six months in jail.

After garnering early support, the bill was pulled from committee consideration after some critical response. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) argues that registries are expensive to maintain and might prompt those charged with animal cruelty to plead to a lesser offense to avoid having to register. The group advocates for court-mandated no-contact orders for those convicted of such crimes. Critics in areas with registries argue that pet store or adoption agency employees are put in an uncomfortable position in declining to deal with a customer who might potentially be violent. Critics also say the registries should distinguish between actual cases of animal cruelty and events involving improper care, like a poorly maintained doghouse.

A number of jurisdictions in the country have similar registries, including Hillsborough County, Florida; Cook County, Illinois; and New York City.  Rhode Island recently passed a bill for a registry that would prohibit those convicted of animal cruelty from owning an animal for 15 years. It's now awaiting Senate approval.

[h/t BRProud.com]

You’ll Be Able to Buy Some of Fiona the Hippo’s Poop to Fertilize Your Garden

Mark Dumont, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0
Mark Dumont, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0

Fiona the hippo has come along way since she was born two months premature at the Cincinnati Zoo in 2017. Today, Fiona is happy and healthy, weighing in at more than 1200 pounds. A hippo that size makes a lot of excrement, and now Fiona fans can purchase some of it to fertilize their gardens, WLWT5 reports.

Fiona produces about 22 pounds of poop a day; just 7 pounds shy of her birth weight. Normally the dung would be sent to a landfill, but as part of its new zero-waste initiative, the Cincinnati Zoo is composting all of its animal waste into fertilizer. Much of it will be added to the zoo's own farm and gardens, but some will also be available to purchase from the zoo's gift shops and online store. The fertilizer will be made from the dung left behind by the hundreds of animals living at the zoo, including Fiona.

The Cincinnati Zoo bills itself as the greenest zoo in the country. In addition to recycling all of its animal waste into compost, it also aims to fill its animal habitats with recycled rain water and grow more food for its animals on its own farm [PDF]. For the zero-waste part of the plan, the zoo plans to repurpose two million pounds of animal feces each year using a combination of on-site and off-site composting.

The zoo is in the process of acquiring the necessary equipment to launch its waste composting program. When the time comes, Fiona will be ready to make her sizable contributions to the project.

[h/t WLWT5]

The Disabled Chihuahua Puppy Who Befriended a Flightless Pigeon Now Has a Tiny Wheelchair

Lundy, the Chihuahua, and his pigeon friend, Herman.
Lundy, the Chihuahua, and his pigeon friend, Herman.
HandicappedPets.com, YouTube

The only thing more heartwarming than an interspecies friendship between a Chihuahua that can’t walk and a pigeon that can’t fly is if the Chihuahua in question happened to own a very tiny wheelchair.

Earlier this month, The Mia Foundation, a nonprofit shelter for special needs animals in Rochester, New York, took to Facebook to share photos of Lundy, a two-month-old Chihuahua without mobility in his back legs, snuggling up with a flightless pigeon named Herman.

"I took Herman out of his playpen to give him some time out and I put him in a dog bed and then I had to tend to Lundy so I put Lundy in with him,” Sue Rogers, who runs the foundation with her husband, Gary, told WHEC. “They just looked really cute together, so I took some pictures and posted them to Facebook and the next morning it was crazy.”

After the post went viral, The Mia Foundation received more than $6000 in monetary donations—and a surprise gift for Lundy. New Hampshire-based pet mobility company Walkin’ Pets provided him with a Mini Walkin’ Wheels wheelchair, a two-wheeled harness meant for disabled animals that weigh between two and 10 pounds. According to a press release from Walkin’ Pets, the shelter had been worried that two-pound Lundy, who could probably fit in the palm of your hand, wouldn’t get the chance to run around with the help of a wheelchair until he grew quite a bit bigger.

lundy the disabled chihuahua with his wheelchair
Lundy patiently waits to try out his new wheelchair.
Walkin' Pets

Newly mobile and even cuter than before, Lundy is now waiting for a kind family to adopt him. Finding a forever home might take him away from his fine feathered friend, but Lundy and Herman’s bond won’t ever be forgotten: There’s now a book called Lundy and Herman that tells their story. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to the Mia Foundation, and you can order it for $20 here.

[h/t WHEC]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER