Louisiana Pulls Back on Creating a Registry for Convicted Animal Abusers

iStock.com/stevedangers
iStock.com/stevedangers

A House bill in Louisiana mandating that people who have been convicted of animal cruelty register on a statewide animal abuser registry won't take affect this year.

According to KLFY in Lafayette, House Bill No. 161 was sponsored by Rep. Robby Carter. The bill would require anyone found guilty of animal abuse to register within seven days and report their name and address. By law, they would then be prohibited from owning an animal for 10 years following the conviction. If they're convicted a second time, they would be prohibited for life.

In theory, the registration would allow adoption agencies like the Humane Society to check potential pet owners against names on the list to make sure no one with a history of harming animals is able to acquire another pet.

The requirement would apply to any resident of Louisiana, even if the crime took place out of state. If someone fails to register, they could faces fines of up to $1000 as well as six months in jail.

After garnering early support, the bill was pulled from committee consideration after some critical response. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) argues that registries are expensive to maintain and might prompt those charged with animal cruelty to plead to a lesser offense to avoid having to register. The group advocates for court-mandated no-contact orders for those convicted of such crimes. Critics in areas with registries argue that pet store or adoption agency employees are put in an uncomfortable position in declining to deal with a customer who might potentially be violent. Critics also say the registries should distinguish between actual cases of animal cruelty and events involving improper care, like a poorly maintained doghouse.

A number of jurisdictions in the country have similar registries, including Hillsborough County, Florida; Cook County, Illinois; and New York City.  Rhode Island recently passed a bill for a registry that would prohibit those convicted of animal cruelty from owning an animal for 15 years. It's now awaiting Senate approval.

[h/t BRProud.com]

New York City Falcon Cam Reveals Nest With Four Eggs

BrianEKushner, iStock via Getty Images
BrianEKushner, iStock via Getty Images

The urban jungle of New York City supports a vibrant wildlife population. One animal that calls the city home is the peregrine falcon, once an endangered species, that has been seen around downtown Manhattan for decades. Recently, a livestream of the falcons of 55 Water Street revealed that one of them is about to be a mom.

The camera on top of the skyscraper at 55 Water Street peers into a falcon nesting site, and a female peregrine falcon there has been displaying incubating behaviors since at least late March, according to the Downtown Alliance's blog. It was assumed she had laid eggs, though this wasn't confirmed until she flew away from her nest on the afternoon of March 31. Her absence left four eggs in clear view of the building's bird camera.

It also created some concern among viewers. When female falcons leave the nest to hunt, the father usually takes over incubating duties—something that didn't happen in this case. Fortunately, the mother wasn't gone long enough to put her eggs in any real danger. She returned later that afternoon, and is currently nesting right where the internet can see her.

Peregrine falcon eggs need to be incubated for about 33 days, so expect to see them hatch sometime within the next month. In the meantime, here are some more animal livestreams to check out.

Busch Is Donating Three Months’ Worth of Beer to People Who Adopt or Foster Shelter Dogs During the Coronavirus Pandemic

This dog can turn a foster home into a forever home with one slobbery smile.
This dog can turn a foster home into a forever home with one slobbery smile.
Nataba/iStock via Getty Images

If getting to play with a happy, lovable pup isn’t already enough of an incentive to foster or adopt a shelter dog, Busch is throwing in a bonus—three months’ worth of free beer.

CNN reports that the “Foster a Dog, Get Busch” deal is available to the first 500 people who foster or adopt from Midwest Animal Rescue & Services (MARS) in Brooklyn Park, Minnesota. Fostering is free, and adoption costs between $200 and $600 (which covers all required vetting services, including deworming, vaccines, spaying or neutering, and more).

The offer is meant to encourage folks to help animals in need at a time when many shelters are canceling adoption events or temporarily shutting down to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus. According to People, Busch is donating an additional $25,000 to MARS to keep the animals safe and cared for.

“During these uncertain and lonelier times, people need an escape: cue the cute puppy memes and photos,” a Busch spokesperson told People. “But as much as we need those cute puppy pics to help get us through social distancing, it’s actually them who need us.”

If you’re interested in hanging out with a MARS rescue and a refreshing bottle of Busch, you can apply to foster a dog here. Once you’ve finished the process and received a confirmation email from the shelter, you should send a screenshot of that email to Busch through Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram before April 25. (Since only the first 500 people will be able to claim your prize, we recommend passing along that confirmation email as soon as you get it.) Busch will respond to winners via social media and send them each a prepaid debit card for $100.

You can take Busch’s advice and use it to buy a hefty supply of alcohol, or you can spend it on something else that’ll help pass the time during self-isolation—like a pop culture subscription box, or products for an indoor garden.

[h/t CNN]

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