Drinking Lots of Coffee Won't Damage Your Arteries, According to a New Study

iStock/ozgurcoskun
iStock/ozgurcoskun

If you need a pot of coffee to make it through the day or have a reserved table at your local coffee shop and worry about what all of that caffeine might be doing to your heart, you may find encouraging news coming out of the British Heart Foundation. Researchers at the organization have found no evidence linking excessive coffee consumption—even up to 25 cups a day, though no one is recommending that—with an increased risk of stiffening arteries, which can lead to heart problems like heart disease or a heart attack.

The data was presented this week at the British Cardiovascular Society Annual Conference and based on a review of 8412 UK residents. The study examined previous research linking coffee ingestion to hardening of the arteries and compared the heart scans of people who drank less than one cup of coffee a day, between one and three cups a day, and more than three cups a day. Researchers found no increased risk of hardening arteries in the group drinking more coffee, which even held true for the small number of the participants who reported drinking up to 25 cups daily.

The study, which has not yet been published or peer-reviewed, was looking only at the link between stiffened arteries and coffee consumption. The idea that guzzling coffee is safe for your heart should not be construed to mean it’s safe overall: a 2017 analysis of over 400 studies on the detrimental effects of coffee found that drinking up to 400 mg daily, or roughly four 8-ounce cups, was tolerable for most people, but that tolerance can vary. One cup might make someone restless, while someone else might not see any adverse effects until they hit cup number four.

People with certain medical conditions, like high blood pressure, should be careful to watch their consumption. Individuals with other chronic conditions should always consult a physician before making caffeine a daily part of their routine. Like most things, it’s best enjoyed in moderation.

[h/t CNBC]

The New Apple Watch SE Is Now Available on Amazon

Apple/Amazon
Apple/Amazon

Apple products are notorious for their high price tags. From AirPods to iPads to MacBooks, it can be difficult to find the perfect piece of tech on sale when you are ready to buy. Luckily, for those who have had their eye on a new Apple Watch, the Apple Watch SE is designed with all the features users want but at a lower starting price of $279— and they're available on Amazon right now.

The SE exists as a more affordable option when compared to Apple's new Series 6 line of watches. This less expensive version has many of the same functions of its pricier brethren, except for certain features like the blood oxygen sensor and electrical heart sensor. To make up for the truncated bells and whistles, the SE comes in at least $120 cheaper than the Series 6, which starts at $400 and goes up to $800. The SE comes with technical improvements on previous models as well, such as the fall detection, a faster processor, a larger screen, water resistance, and more.

Now available in 40mm ($279) and 44mm ($309), both SE models offer a variety of colors to choose from, such as sliver, space gray, and pink. If you want cellular connection, you’ll have to pay a bit more for the 40mm ($329) and the 44mm ($359).

For more, head to Amazon to see the full list of offerings from Apple.

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Why Can’t You Smell Your Own Breath? There Are a Few Theories

Hands are built-in tools for detecting bad breath.
Hands are built-in tools for detecting bad breath.
SIphotography/iStock via Getty Images

The fact that we rarely catch a whiff of our own breath seems fishy. For one, our noses are only a philtrum’s length away from our mouths. We also don’t have any trouble inhaling other people’s stale carbon dioxide, even with a solid few feet between us.

Though we don’t yet have a decisive scientific explanation for this olfactory phenomenon, there’s no shortage of promising theories. According to BreathMD, it could be that we became so accustomed to smelling our own breath that we simply don’t notice its odor anymore—similar to the way we can’t detect our own "house smell." This kind of habituation doesn’t just inure us to unpleasant aromas, it also leaves our noses free to focus on unfamiliar odors in our environment that could alert us to danger.

As HowStuffWorks reports, another hypothesis suggests that we’re more conscious of other people’s halitosis because breath released when speaking is different than breath released when exhaling regularly. All the tongue movement that happens when someone talks could push odors from the back of their mouth out into the air.

But if that’s true, it seems like you’d be able to smell your own breath—at least when you’re the one doing the talking. Which brings us to the next and final theory: That your bad breath dissipates before you get a chance to inhale it. When someone else exhales, you’re inhaling their air almost simultaneously. When you exhale, on the other hand, you have to wait until you’ve reached the very end of your expiration before breathing back in again. By that time, the malodorous particles may have already dispersed.

Even if you’re blissfully unaware of how your own breath smells, it could be a little nose-wrinkling for others—here are some tips for getting rid of halitosis.