If you need a pot of coffee to make it through the day or have a reserved table at your local coffee shop and worry about what all of that caffeine might be doing to your heart, you may find encouraging news coming out of the British Heart Foundation. Researchers at the organization have found no evidence linking excessive coffee consumption—even up to 25 cups a day, though no one is recommending that—with an increased risk of stiffening arteries, which can lead to heart problems like heart disease or a heart attack.

The data was presented this week at the British Cardiovascular Society Annual Conference and based on a review of 8412 UK residents. The study examined previous research linking coffee ingestion to hardening of the arteries and compared the heart scans of people who drank less than one cup of coffee a day, between one and three cups a day, and more than three cups a day. Researchers found no increased risk of hardening arteries in the group drinking more coffee, which even held true for the small number of the participants who reported drinking up to 25 cups daily.

The study, which has not yet been published or peer-reviewed, was looking only at the link between stiffened arteries and coffee consumption. The idea that guzzling coffee is safe for your heart should not be construed to mean it’s safe overall: a 2017 analysis of over 400 studies on the detrimental effects of coffee found that drinking up to 400 mg daily, or roughly four 8-ounce cups, was tolerable for most people, but that tolerance can vary. One cup might make someone restless, while someone else might not see any adverse effects until they hit cup number four.

People with certain medical conditions, like high blood pressure, should be careful to watch their consumption. Individuals with other chronic conditions should always consult a physician before making caffeine a daily part of their routine. Like most things, it’s best enjoyed in moderation.

[h/t CNBC]