11 Art Greats Who Started Out as Street Artists

Carl Court/Getty Images
Carl Court/Getty Images

Several iconic artists got their start on the street, and many still put up work outdoors even as they show their art indoors, at some of the world’s most exclusive galleries and museums. Here are 11 of those art greats who pull double duty.

1. SHEPARD FAIREY

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In 1989, while a student at the Rhode Island School of Design, Shepard Fairey created a stencil featuring Andre the Giant. Disseminated by and through the skateboarding community, variations of the image in black, white, and red, many with the word “obey,” quickly appeared around the world. Fairey’s Obey Giant posters, stickers, and stencils subsequently became some of the most recognizable street art ever made. In 2008, his poster featuring Barack Obama and the word “hope,” part of the US presidential campaign, became even more iconic. The Smithsonian acquired the mixed media portrait shortly before Obama’s inauguration, and in 2009 Fairey had his first solo show at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston. 

2. GAIA

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A self-described “white kid from the Upper East Side,” Gaia belongs on this list for the amount he’s already achieved. By the time he’d graduated from college in 2011, he’d gained fame for his fantastical wheatpastes of animals and people, generally exploring themes of gentrification and environmental degeneration, and he’d had exhibitions at galleries in Los Angeles, Portland, and Washington, D.C. Since then, he has twice curated Open Walls Baltimore, a well-regarded festival devoted to murals by such street artists as Chris Stain and Nanook, and opened his first big solo show at the Baltimore Museum of Art.  

3. BANKSY

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Probably the most famous street artist in the world, Banksy began creating socially conscious, satirical stencils in his native Bristol, UK, in the early 1990s. He’s come a long way since then: his street art has become so valuable that it regularly gets chipped out of walls or stolen. In summer 2014, Sotheby’s held an “unauthorized” retrospective, with some pieces priced at £500,000. Banksy has surreptitiously hung his work at the Louvre, the Tate Modern, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, even as he has put on authorized shows at galleries and museums. His real name remains unknown.   

4. JEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT

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No one quite knew what to make of such spraypainted slogans as “SAMO© as an escape clause” or “SAMO© for the so-called avant garde” when they first appeared around Downtown Manhattan in 1976. SAMO stood for “same old shit,” and was a collaboration between Jean-Michel Basquiat and two friends. He killed off SAMO by writing “SAMO is dead” in 1979, then fully turned his attention to the neo-expressionist paintings that made him famous. Boasting vivid colors and human anatomy, and sometimes incorporating wordsa throwback to Basquiat’s days as a graffiti writerthey have been shown around the world, including at the Whitney Museum of Art and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles.  

5. KEITH HARING

Anne-Christine Poujoulant/AFP/Getty Images

As a student at the School of Visual Arts in New York City in 1980, Keith Haring began executing quick drawings in white chalk on the black matte paper found in subway stations. These “subway drawings” helped him hone his signature style of squiggles, figures, and symbols. He had his first solo show in Soho, at the Tony Shafrazi Gallery, in 1982. Haring went on to exhibit work at the Venice Biennale, Whitney Biennial, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and Hirshhorn Museum, among other venues; to execute large-scale public works projects; and to open his very own retail store before his death in 1990. 

6. JR

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Famous for his way-larger-than-life photographic portraits pasted around neighborhoods, JR started taking pictures of street art after finding a camera in the Paris Métro. But it wasn’t until he started photographing people, including young men in impoverished Parisian suburbs, and pasting the photos illegally in public spaces, that his career took off. In 2011, he used his TED prize money to start Inside Out, a global art project that “transform[s] messages of personal identity into works of art” by letting everyday people take and submit photographs of community members, which are then transformed into posters. JR has shown his work at galleries and museums in Shanghai, London, Berlin, and Los Angeles.    

7. LADY PINK

Lady Pink began tagging at age 15. Along with street artists like Lee Quiñones and Fab 5 Freddy, she starred in the 1983 movie Wild Style, about hip hop and graffiti in New York City. In time she moved from doing stylized versions of her name to executing full-scale murals and fine art, frequently featuring female figures and imagery from the natural world, especially plants. In 1984, at age 21, she had her first solo show at the Moore College of Art & Design in Philadelphia. Her paintings have since been acquired by the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of Art, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. 

8. BARRY MCGEE

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Barry McGee plastered the streets of San Francisco, his hometown, and elsewhere with the name “Twist” as a young man in the 1980s and 1990s. Today, he shows multimedia installations, drawings, and paintings under his given name, Barry McGee, at museums like the Walker Art Center and Tokyo’s Watari Museum of Contemporary Art. His work taps into questions of identity and consumerism, often features sad sack men, and contains graphical, brightly colored elements. In 2013, as the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston prepared a mid-career retrospective of his work, McGee told the New York Times that various circumstances have caused him to pull back from the street: “I just don’t have time . . . It’s really hard at a certain age to keep up that lifestyle.”     

9. OLEK

Olek moved to New York City in 2000, shortly after graduating from college in her native Poland, where, she has said, she “grew up in a place with no colors.” Sleepless at a friend’s apartment on Christmas Eve in 2003, Olek began crocheting whatever she found in the refrigerator; she not only gave herself a way to pass the long night but also discovered her artistic calling. Olek has since crocheted a double-decker bus, grocery carts, the results of an ex’s STD test, and the Wall Street bull, among other objects both mundane and extraordinary. A 2012 show at the Smithsonian featured the crocheted contents of her entire apartment.

10. RETNA

You can almost always identify a RETNA piece at a glance, because of its signature blend of calligraphy, hieroglyphics, and historical typography. His work on the street and in galleries plays with the notion of tagging. Much as some tags are only discernible to a select few, his work can be unintelligible unless you know the code of this highly idiosyncratic alphabet. He told The Economist’s blog that his script consists of “names my mom would call me when I was growing up, and some are things I’m talking about, friends who have passed away—they’re interactions with what’s going on with people that I just meet, or a conversation I just had. I hear a word or a phrase or a dialogue, and then that becomes my response. They all say something.” He has put on shows in New York, Los Angeles, and Venice. 

11. SWOON

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Caledonia Dance Curry was a student at Brooklyn’s Pratt Institute when she started putting up wheatpastes of her friends, family, and neighbors around New York City in 1999. Sensitive without being sentimental, moving without being maudlin, delicate even as they start to decay, these portraits appeared in abandoned buildings and other out-of-the-way spots. By 2005, she was well known as Swoon, and her work was exhibited or collected by such institutions as the Museum of Modern Art and Art Basel in Miami Beach. In 2014, she created a site-specific installation at the Brooklyn Museum that included a raft made from NYC garbage along with a 65-foot tree made from ribbon and paper.   

Art

Looking to Downsize? You Can Buy a 5-Room DIY Cabin on Amazon for Less Than $33,000

Five rooms of one's own.
Five rooms of one's own.
Allwood/Amazon

If you’ve already mastered DIY houses for birds and dogs, maybe it’s time you built one for yourself.

As Simplemost reports, there are a number of house kits that you can order on Amazon, and the Allwood Avalon Cabin Kit is one of the quaintest—and, at $32,990, most affordable—options. The 540-square-foot structure has enough space for a kitchen, a bathroom, a bedroom, and a sitting room—and there’s an additional 218-square-foot loft with the potential to be the coziest reading nook of all time.

You can opt for three larger rooms if you're willing to skip the kitchen and bathroom.Allwood/Amazon

The construction process might not be a great idea for someone who’s never picked up a hammer, but you don’t need an architectural degree to tackle it. Step-by-step instructions and all materials are included, so it’s a little like a high-level IKEA project. According to the Amazon listing, it takes two adults about a week to complete. Since the Nordic wood walls are reinforced with steel rods, the house can withstand winds up to 120 mph, and you can pay an extra $1000 to upgrade from double-glass windows and doors to triple-glass for added fortification.

Sadly, the cool ceiling lamp is not included.Allwood/Amazon

Though everything you need for the shell of the house comes in the kit, you will need to purchase whatever goes inside it: toilet, shower, sink, stove, insulation, and all other furnishings. You can also customize the blueprint to fit your own plans for the space; maybe, for example, you’re going to use the house as a small event venue, and you’d rather have two or three large, airy rooms and no kitchen or bedroom.

Intrigued? Find out more here.

[h/t Simplemost]

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The Psychological Tricks Disney Parks Use to Make Long Wait Times More Bearable

© Jorge Royan, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0
© Jorge Royan, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0

No one goes to Disneyland or Disney World to spend the day waiting in line, but when a queue is well-designed, waiting can be part of the experience. Disney knows this better than anyone, and the parks' Imagineers have developed several tricks over the years to make long wait times as painless as possible.

According to Popular Science, hacking the layout of the line itself is a simple way to influence the rider's perspective. When a queue consists of 200 people zig-zagging around ropes in a large, open room, it's easy for waiting guests to feel overwhelmed. This design allows riders to see exactly how many people are in line in front of them—which isn't necessarily a good thing when the line is long.

Imagineers prevent this by keeping riders in the dark when they enter the queue. In Space Mountain, for example, walls are built around the twisting path, so riders have no idea how much farther they have to go until they're deeper into the building. This stops people from giving up when they first get in line.

Another example of deception ride designers use is the "Machiavellian twist." If you've ever been pleasantly surprised by a line that moved faster than you expected, that was intentional. The signs listing wait times at the beginning of ride queues purposefully inflate the numbers. That way, when a wait that was supposed to be 120 minutes goes by in 90, you feel like you have more time than you did before.

The final trick is something Disney parks are famous for: By incorporating the same level of production design found on the ride into the queue, Imagineers make waiting in line an engaging experience that has entertainment value of its own. The Tower of Terror queue in Disney World, which is modeled after a decrepit 1930s hotel lobby down to the cobwebs and the abandoned coffee cups, feels like it could be a movie set. Some ride lines even use special effects. While waiting to ride Star Wars: Ride of the Resistance in Galaxy's Edge, guests get to watch holograms and animatronics that set up the story of the ride. This strategy exploits the so-called dual-task paradigm, which makes the line feel as if it's going by faster by giving riders mental stimulation as they wait.

Tricky ride design is just one of Disney's secrets. Here are more behind-the-scenes facts about the beloved theme parks.

[h/t Popular Science]