Dealing With an Annoying Bug In Chrome? Report It to Google and You Might Get $30,000

Carsten Koall, Stringer/Getty Images
Carsten Koall, Stringer/Getty Images

Finding a security hole in your web browser isn't normally something to be happy about. But if you're the first person to encounter a software bug compromising Google Chrome, you could earn a big check from the company. As CNET reports, Google's bug bounty program, which has been rewarding amateur users' bug reports since 2010, has increased its maximum payment to $30,000.

For nearly a decade, Google has used bounties as a way to catch vulnerabilities in its security system before hackers can exploit them. The tech giant says it has paid out more than $5 million in rewards for more than 8500 bug reports. That number may seem enormous, but compared to the cost of hiring more programmers full-time—or the cost of a major security breach—it's a smart investment on Google's part.

In a recent blog post, Google announced that it will be increasing reward amounts across the board. The baseline payment for a regular bug report has been tripled from $5000 to $15,000, and the maximum reward for a high-quality report has doubled from $15,000 to $30,000. Google lays out what constitutes a high-quality report on its application security page.

Computer whizzes who detect attacks on Chrome OS, the software foundation for Chromebooks, can receive even bigger paydays from Google. The company will pay $150,000 to anyone who reports exploit chains that can compromise a Chromebook or Chromebox in its more restricted guest mode. Fuzzers—bug-hunters who look for vulnerabilities in a product by hitting it with random data—are also getting bigger rewards. The bonus they receive for finding bugs using the Chrome Fuzzer Program has been doubled to $1000.

Using bug bounties as an incentive to report security issues is a practice used across the tech industry. Earlier in 2019, Apple thanked the 14-year-old who first discovered the disastrous Group FaceTime bug by giving him money for college.

[h/t CNET]

Sprint Will Fix the Cracked Screen on Your Samsung Galaxy for $49—Even if They're Not Your Carrier

SergeyChayko/iStock via Getty Images
SergeyChayko/iStock via Getty Images

In a move designed to engender some consumer goodwill, phone service carrier Sprint recently announced that it will repair cracked Samsung Galaxy smartphone screens for a set price of $49. And this time, the fine print works in the consumer’s favor. You don’t need to be a Sprint phone plan customer in order to take advantage of the deal.

The program’s website has the details, but it’s a relatively straightforward offer. If you have a damaged Galaxy screen, you can have it repaired regardless of your carrier through February 9, 2020. (The newest Galaxy S10 model is not included in the offer, but it should still be under warranty.)

Here are the eligible phones:

  • Samsung Galaxy S7
  • Samsung Galaxy S8
  • Samsung Galaxy S8+
  • Samsung Galaxy S9
  • Samsung Galaxy S9+
  • Samsung Galaxy Note8

According to Android Authority, this is actually a pretty good deal as Samsung screen repairs can cost you over $200. You’ll have to take the still-working phone into a Sprint store with repair services in order to take advantage of the offer. (And presumably, be tempted into switching to Sprint if you’re not already a customer.) If the device cannot be repaired, Sprint will give you $150 in store credit toward a new phone. You can find a list of repair locations by here.

[h/t Engadget]

Scam Alert: A FedEx Tracking Notification Text Wants to Steal Your Credit Card Number

interstid/iStock via Getty Images
interstid/iStock via Getty Images

Thanks to moment-by-moment tracking software offered by delivery services like FedEx, UPS, and the post office, consumers can keep tabs on their packages before they're even delivered. We’ve grown so accustomed to getting notification texts that it might be easy to let a bogus one slip by.

According to How-To Geek, that could prove to be an expensive mistake. The site is reporting that a scam currently making the rounds involves a fraudulent text notification of an impending FedEx package. The message is prompting recipients to “set delivery preferences” for the delivery. When smartphone users click on the link in the message, they’re directed to what looks like an Amazon satisfaction survey. After completing the survey, users are offered a free gift and then asked to remit their credit card information to pay $6.99 for shipping. This also triggers a monthly subscription charge of $98.95.

Due to the deluge of solicitations for customer surveys prompted by businesses, this is a clever bit of misdirection. Needless to say, it’s also not a legitimate offer. Amazon is unlikely to ever route you to a new URL for a “free gift.” If you’re unsure whether you have a package on the way, it’s a good idea to navigate directly to the FedEx or shipper website to check. It’s also best to block the incoming number to opt out of any future texts offering to separate you from your money.

[h/t How-To Geek]

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