Teen Activists in Oregon Help Pass Law Allowing Students to Take ‘Mental Health Days’

Milkos/iStock via Getty Images
Milkos/iStock via Getty Images

Oregon's public school system is updating its sick day policy in response to a campaign by teen activists, NPR reports. Prior to the change, students could only be excused from school for doctor's appointments, emergencies, or physical illnesses. Now, a new bill allows students to take mental health days just as easily as they would take sick days for a cold.

Hailey Hardcastle, an 18-year-old from Oregon, became aware of the importance of mental health days while attending summer camp for the Oregon Association of Student Councils last year. There, she organized workshops for students to brainstorm solutions to mental health issues. One of the ideas they came up with was giving students the freedom to stay home from school to take care of their mental wellbeing.

They didn't drop the idea when the brainstorm ended. Hardcastle, along with three other teens, went down to the Oregon Capitol to lobby for a bill that would oblige schools to accept mental health days as a valid excuse for absences. Their activism worked: In June 2019, Oregon Governor Kate Brown signed a bill officially recognizing mental health days into law.

Recent research has found that teens and young adults are more depressed now than they were a decade ago. In the U.S., suicide is the second-leading cause of death among young people, and across ages, Oregon's suicide rates are higher than the national average. Oregon's new mental health day policy not only helps students on their worst mental health days, but by acknowledging the problem, aims to reduce the stigma around mental illness.

By passing the law, Oregon has become one of the only states in the country to allow students to stay home for mental health reasons. Utah enacted a similar law in 2018.

[h/t NPR]

This $49 Video Game Design Course Will Teach You Everything From Coding to Digital Art Skills

EvgeniyShkolenko/iStock via Getty Images
EvgeniyShkolenko/iStock via Getty Images

If you spend the bulk of your free time playing video games and want to elevate your hobby into a career, you can take advantage of the School of Game Design’s lifetime membership, which is currently on sale for just $49. You can jump into your education as a beginner, or at any other skill level, to learn what you need to know about game development, design, coding, and artistry skills.

Gaming is a competitive industry, and understanding just programming or just artistry isn’t enough to land a job. The School of Game Design’s lifetime membership is set up to educate you in both fields so your resume and work can stand out.

The lifetime membership that’s currently discounted is intended to allow you to learn at your own pace so you don’t burn out, which would be pretty difficult to do because the lessons have you building advanced games in just your first few hours of learning. The remote classes will train you with step-by-step, hands-on projects that more than 50,000 other students around the world can vouch for.

Once you’ve nailed the basics, the lifetime membership provides unlimited access to thousands of dollars' worth of royalty-free game art and textures to use in your 2D or 3D designs. Support from instructors and professionals with over 16 years of game industry experience will guide you from start to finish, where you’ll be equipped to land a job doing something you truly love.

Earn money doing what you love with an education from the School of Game Design’s lifetime membership, currently discounted at $49.

 

School of Game Design: Lifetime Membership - $49

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Victorian Women Worked Out, Too—They Just Did It Wearing Corsets

Opening a door was nearly as taxing as an actual 19th-century workout.
Opening a door was nearly as taxing as an actual 19th-century workout.
ivan-96/iStock via Getty Images

The next time you’re gasping for breath in the middle of a cardio routine, try to imagine doing the same thing while decked out in a flowy dress and corset. That’s what female exercise enthusiasts faced in the 1800s.

According to Atlas Obscura, tailors weren’t churning out loose leggings or stretchy tracksuits for women to don for their daily fitness sessions, and workout guides for Victorian women were mainly written by men. To their credit, they weren’t recommending that ladies undergo high-intensity interval training or heavy lifting; instead, exercises were devised to account for the fact that women’s movements would be greatly constricted by tight bodices and elaborate hairstyles. As such, workouts focused on getting the blood flowing rather than burning calories or toning muscle.

In his 1827 book A Treatise on Calisthenic Exercises, Signor G.P. Voarino detailed dozens of options for women, including skipping, walking in zigzags, marching in place, and bending your arms and legs at specific angles. Some exercises even called for the use of a cane, though they were more geared towards balancing and stretching than weight-lifting.

To Voarino, the light calisthenic exercises were meant for “counteracting every tendency to deformity, and for obviating such defects of figure as are occasioned by confinement within doors, too close an application to sedentary employment, or by those constrained positions which young ladies habitually assume during their hours of study.”

Nearly 30 years later, Catharine Beecher (Harriet Beecher Stowe's sister) published her own workout guide, Physiology and Calisthenics for Schools and Families, which encouraged educators especially to incorporate exercise programs for all children into their curricula. Beecher was against corsets, but the illustrations in her book did still depict young ladies in long dresses—it would be some time before students were expected to change into gym clothes at school. Many of Beecher’s calisthenic exercises were similar to Voarino’s, though she included some beginner ballet positions, arm circles, and other faster-paced movements.

Compared to the fitness regimen of 14th-century knight Jean Le Maingre, however, Victorian calisthenics seem perfectly reasonable. From scaling walls to throwing stones, here’s how he liked to break a sweat.

[h/t Atlas Obscura]