7 Fun Facts About Cards Against Humanity

Pabo Punk, Flickr // Public Domain
Pabo Punk, Flickr // Public Domain

Since 2011, the popular party game Cards Against Humanity has managed to make being offensive a cottage industry. Using a deck of cards filled with off-color commentary, players are tasked with filling in phrases using answer cards that create scenarios ranging from the merely obscene to the downright scandalous. The rules are loose—players can keep going until they decide they want to stop—but the game has proven to be a hit. Check out some facts about Cards Against Humanity's origins, its Black Friday specials involving poop, and the time the creators pondered whether to cut up a Picasso.

1. Cards Against Humanity started as a game made of construction paper.

In 2009, Max Temkin, Josh Dillon, Daniel Dranove, Eli Halpern, Ben Hantoot, David Munk, David Pinsof, and Eliot Weinstein—a group of friends, most of whom had attended high school together—got together over their winter break and decided to design a game that could entertain guests during their annual New Year’s Eve parties. While they thought of a variety of games, only one of them—which they called Cardenfreude, after schadenfreude, the German word for delighting in another’s misfortune—stuck.

They continued working on the game after they all headed back to their respective colleges, using pieces of construction paper to print out questions and answers. Later, Temkin and his friends released the game for free under a Creative Commons license. Thanks to early word of mouth, a 2011 Kickstarter campaign was successful and allowed them to produce a commercial edition of the game—which, despite being free to download and print, became an immediate hit. Cards Against Humanity sold nearly 500,000 copies in its first two years and became Amazon’s bestselling game during that period of time.

2. Cards Against Humanity was so popular, people didn’t mind paying triple the price.

From the beginning, Temkin and his friends knew that they wanted their venture to be an independent one, not an investor-financed endeavor, so they secured their own manufacturer for the game: Ad Magic, a New Jersey firm specializing in playing cards. They outsourced the work to a factory in China, but as the game racked up sales online, production couldn’t keep up. As a result, copies of Cards Against Humanity sold for up to three times its $25 retail price on the secondary market until production increased.

3. The team successfully sold bull dung to consumers.

For a 2014 Black Friday promotional stunt, the Cards Against Humanity company promised to send consumers a box of “bullsh*t.” The company sold and shipped boxes containing a solid piece of real bull dung that was procured from a cattle ranch in Texas. All 30,000 pieces, which were priced at $6 each, sold out within a half-hour the day they went on sale.

According to Temkin, the fecal matter was intended to be a commentary on the sensationalist nature of the hype surrounding Black Friday sales. They’ve made a tradition of attention-grabbing projects each holiday season. In 2015, they held a “promotion” in which people could send them $5 and get nothing in return. (They collected $71,145 and split it among their employees.) In 2016, the company dug a purposely pointless “holiday hole” in an undisclosed area using funds donated by customers. In 2018, the company held a 99-percent-off sale which featured bizarre items at a steep discount like a cheese wheel and an actual car for $97.50. The items were purportedly all real and delivered to purchasers.

4. The company doesn’t have much of a sense of humor about copycats.

Though Cards Against Humanity has drawn comparisons to Apples to Apples, a wordplay game that was released in 1999, the company is not prone to tolerating lookalike products. While people are free to make expansion packs that build on the game’s premise, the company frowns upon them monetizing their creations and will often enlist their lawyers to discourage unauthorized games. Decks like Cards Against Originality and Cards and Punishment, which resemble the now-familiar black and white color scheme and Helvetica font of the original Cards Against Humanity, can invite problems. The company says it has concerns because fans often confuse the third-party projects with official expansion packs.

5. Cards Against Humanity might be the only game with a writer’s room.

To keep the material of the expansion packs fresh, Temkin and his partners enlisted Chicago-area comedians to convene for a writer’s room at the company’s offices beginning in 2016. As a result, the game reportedly became raunchier and weirder. The writers also act as a focus group of sorts, making sure the cards are offensive but not excessively so. That system doesn't always work, however. In 2017, Target removed an expansion pack from stores after it was criticized for being antisemitic.

6. The staff contemplated destroying an original Picasso.

In December 2015, the staff of Cards Against Humanity acquired Tête de Faune, an original work by Pablo Picasso. Though it was never conclusively determined how they had come to acquire it, it was likely from a Chicago-area art dealer. The team ran an online poll to decide whether it should be donated to the Art Institute of Chicago or sliced into 150,000 pieces and distributed to consumers. Of the 50,000 people who voted, 71.3 percent opted to keep it intact.

7. The company opened a pop-up store.

In 2017, the team behind Cards Against Humanity opened a pop-up store in Chicago in collaboration with the Chicago Design Museum. Located in Block 37’s Chicago Design Market, the storefront sold a variety of games and other Cards Against Humanity-related merchandise, as well as work from local artists. The store was temporary, but the company still sells products via retail outlets like Target and Walmart.

Amazon's Under-the-Radar Coupon Page Features Deals on Home Goods, Electronics, and Groceries

Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

Now that Prime Day is over, and with Black Friday and Cyber Monday still a few weeks away, online deals may seem harder to come by. And while it can be a hassle to scour the internet for promo codes, buy-one-get-one deals, and flash sales, Amazon actually has an extensive coupon page you might not know about that features deals to look through every day.

As pointed out by People, the coupon page breaks deals down by categories, like electronics, home & kitchen, and groceries (the coupons even work with SNAP benefits). Since most of the deals revolve around the essentials, it's easy to stock up on items like Cottonelle toilet paper, Tide Pods, Cascade dishwasher detergent, and a 50 pack of surgical masks whenever you're running low.

But the low prices don't just stop at necessities. If you’re looking for the best deal on headphones, all you have to do is go to the electronics coupon page and it will bring up a deal on these COWIN E7 PRO noise-canceling headphones, which are now $80, thanks to a $10 coupon you could have missed.

Alternatively, if you are looking for deals on specific brands, you can search for their coupons from the page. So if you've had your eye on the Homall S-Racer gaming chair, you’ll find there's currently a coupon that saves you 5 percent, thanks to a simple search.

To discover all the deals you have been missing out on, head over to the Amazon Coupons page.

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10 Words and Phrases That Came From TV Shows

Photo illustration by Mental Floss. Image: iStock.
Photo illustration by Mental Floss. Image: iStock.

Television can be a hotbed of creativity (or mediocrity, depending on who you ask). But it's not just characters and storylines writers are coming up with—they also coin words. Here are 10 surprising words that were invented thanks to TV.

1. Poindexter

While this term for a studious nerd might seem very 1980s, it actually comes from a cartoon character introduced on TV in 1959. In the series Felix the Cat, Poindexter is the feline’s bespectacled, genius nephew, supposedly named for Emmet Poindexter, the series creator’s lawyer.

2. Eye Candy

This phrase meaning a thing or person that offers visual appeal but not much substance originally referred to such a feature of a TV program. According to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), it first appeared in 1978 issue of a Louisiana newspaper called The Hammond Daily Star: “Sex … is more blatant ... ‘Eye candy,' as one network executive calls it.” Ear candy is slightly earlier, from the title of a 1977 album by Helen Reddy, while arm candy is later, from 1992.

3. Ribbit

Think frogs have always been known to say “ribbit”? Think again: According to the OED, this onomatopoeia might have originated on a TV show in the late-1960s. While we can’t say for sure that absolutely no one was making this frog sound before then, the earliest recorded usage found so far (according to linguist Ben Zimmer) is from a 1965 episode of Gilligan’s Island, in which Mel Blanc voiced a character called Ribbit the Frog. This predates the OED’s earliest entry, which is from a 1968 episode of the Smother Brothers Comedy Hour: “That’s right. Ribit! .. I am a frog.”

4. Sorry About That

You've probably used this expression of regret more than once in your life, but did you know it was popularized by Get Smart? It's one of the many catchphrases from the late 1960s TV show. Others include “missed it by that much” and “the old (so-and-so) trick.”

5. Cromulent

Cromulent is a perfectly cromulent word, as far as the OED is concerned. This adjective invented on The Simpsons means “acceptable, adequate, satisfactory.” Other OED words the denizens of Springfield popularized are meh (perhaps influenced by the Yiddish “me,” meaning “be it as it may, so-so,” from 1928 or earlier), d’oh (the earliest recorded usage is from a 1945 British radio show), and embiggen, which first appeared in an 1884 publication by English publisher George Bell: “Are there not, however, barbarous verbs in all languages? … The people magnified them, to make great or embiggen, if we may invent an English parallel as ugly.”

6. Five-O

The OED’s earliest citation of this slang term for the police is from a 1983 article in The New York Times, although it was probably in use long before that. The moniker comes from Hawaii Five-O, which premiered in 1968. In the show, five-o refers to a particular police unit and apparently was named in honor of Hawaii being the 50th state.

7. Gomer

While the word gomer has been around since the year 1000 (referring to a Hebrew unit of measure), the sense of someone stupid or inept comes from the inept titular character in the 1960s show Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C. It’s also a derogatory name among medical professionals for a difficult patient, especially an elderly one.

8. Cowabunga

Sure, the 1960s surfing slang might have regained popularity in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s due to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles cartoon series, but it originated way before then. Chief Thunderthud, a character on the 1950s children’s show Howdy Doody would use it as faux Native American language. After that, it somehow made its way into surfer slang, hence becoming a catchphrase of Michelangelo, the hard-partying, surfing ninja turtle.

9. Har De Har

The next time you want to laugh in a sarcastic, old-timey way, thank Jackie Gleason for popularizing har de har via his iconic 1950s show, The Honeymooners.

10. Spam

So how in the world did spam, originally the name of a canned ham, come to mean junk email or to inundate with junk emails or postings? Chalk it up to Monty Python’s Flying Circus. The food Spam (which stands for either “spiced ham” or “shoulder of pork and ham”) was invented during the Great Depression in the late 1930s. Fast-forward 40-some-odd years and the British sketch comics were singing incessantly about it. This apparently was the inspiration for the computer slang that came about in the early 1990s.