A MoviePass Security Gaffe Leaves Tens of Thousands of Accounts Exposed

zhuzhu/iStock via Getty Images
zhuzhu/iStock via Getty Images

When MoviePass launched a $9.95 subscription service in 2017, it was heralded as nothing less than a revolution in the moviegoing experience. The monthly fee allowed once-daily admission to first-run theatrical films at all of the major chains. Roughly 1 million people signed up for the app in the first four months alone. But AMC and other exhibitors resisted the business plan, leading to dwindling benefits and bad press.

Now, MoviePass is dealing with another issue: Leaving the customer card numbers of at least 58,000 users, plus many credit card numbers, easily accessible on a server.

According to TechCrunch, the data was first discovered by Dubai-based security firm SpiderSilk and security researcher Mossab Hussein. The cards were left unencrypted and available to review on the server without the need for a password. MoviePass cards are issued by Mastercard and operate like conventional debit cards, with pre-loaded balances that pay the full admission price at theater chains. The unsecured server also had conventional credit card information for customers that are used to pay the MoviePass subscription. These records included billing addresses. TechCrunch stated that among the records they reviewed, some contained enough information to make fraudulent purchases.

The database was taken offline this week, but it’s believed it had been open and accessible for months. Security researcher Nitish Shah said he discovered the database earlier in the year, wrote MoviePass to warn them, but received no reply. In a statement, MoviePass CEO Mitch Lowe said the company was looking into it and would notify affected customers. In the interim, it's probably wise for MoviePass subscribers to monitor affiliated credit cards for any suspicious charges.

[h/t Gizmodo]

Mental Floss's Three-Day Sale Includes Deals on Apple AirPods, Sony Wireless Headphones, and More

Apple
Apple

During this weekend's three-day sale on the Mental Floss Shop, you'll find deep discounts on products like AirPods, Martha Stewart’s bestselling pressure cooker, and more. Check out the best deals below.

1. Apple AirPods Pro; $219

Apple

You may not know it by looking at them, but these tiny earbuds by Apple offer HDR sound, 30 hours of noise cancellation, and powerful bass, all through Bluetooth connectivity. These trendy, sleek AirPods will even read your messages and allow you to share your audio with another set of AirPods nearby.

Buy it: The Mental Floss Shop

2. Sony Zx220bt Wireless On-Ear Bluetooth Headphones (Open Box - Like New); $35

Sony

For the listener who likes a traditional over-the-ear headphone, this set by Sony will give you all the same hands-free calling, extended battery power, and Bluetooth connectivity as their tiny earbud counterparts. They have a swivel folding design to make stashing them easy, a built-in microphone for voice commands and calls, and quality 1.18-inch dome drivers for dynamic sound quality.

Buy it: The Mental Floss Shop

3. Sony Xb650bt Wireless On-Ear Bluetooth Headphones; $46

Sony

This Sony headphone model stands out for its extra bass and the 30 hours of battery life you get with each charge. And in between your favorite tracks, you can take hands-free calls and go seamlessly back into the music.

Buy it: The Mental Floss Shop

4. Martha Stewart 8-quart Stainless-Steel Pressure Cooker; $65

Martha Stewart

If you’re thinking of taking the plunge and buying a new pressure cooker, this 8-quart model from Martha Stewart comes with 14 presets, a wire rack, a spoon, and a rice measuring cup to make delicious dinners using just one appliance.

Buy it: The Mental Floss Shop

5. Jashen V18 350w Cordless Vacuum Cleaner; $180

Jashen

If you're obsessive about cleanliness, it's time to lose the vacuum cord and opt for this untethered model from JASHEN. Touting a 4.3-star rating from Amazon, the JASHEN cordless vacuum features a brushless motor with strong suction, noise optimization, and a convenient wall mount for charging and storage.

Buy it: The Mental Floss Shop

6. Evachill Ev-500 Personal Air Conditioner; $65

Evachill

This EvaChill personal air conditioner is an eco-friendly way to cool yourself down in any room of the house. You can set it up at your work desk at home, and in just a few minutes, this portable cooling unit can drop the temperature by 59º. All you need to do is fill the water tank and plug in the USB cord.

Buy it: The Mental Floss Shop

7. Gourmia Gcm7800 Brewdini 5-Cup Cold Brew Coffee Maker; $120

Gourmia

The perfect cup of cold brew can take up to 12 hours to prepare, but this Gourmia Cold Brew Coffee Maker can do the job in just a couple of minutes. It has a strong suction that speeds up brew time while preserving flavor in up to five cups of delicious cold brew at a time.

Buy it: The Mental Floss Shop

8. Townew: The World's First Self-Sealing Trash Can; $90

Townew

Never deal with handling gross garbage again when you have this smart bin helping you in the kitchen. With one touch, the Townew will seal the full bag for easy removal. Once you grab the neatly sealed bag, the Townew will load in a new clean one on its own.

Buy it: The Mental Floss Shop

9. Light Smart Solar Powered Parking Sensor (Two-Pack); $155

FenSens

Parking sensors are amazing, but a lot of cars require a high trim to access them. You can easily upgrade your car—and parking skills—with this solar-powered parking sensor. It will give you audio and visual alerts through your phone for the perfect parking job every time.

Buy it: The Mental Floss Shop

10. Liz: The Smart Self-Cleaning Bottle With UV Sterilization; $46

Noerden

Reusable water bottles are convenient and eco-friendly, but they’re super inconvenient to get inside to clean. This smart water bottle will clean itself with UV sterilization to eliminate 99.9 percent of viruses and bacteria. That’s what makes it clean, but the single-tap lid for temperature, hydration reminders, and an anti-leak functionality are what make it smart.

Buy it: The Mental Floss Shop

Prices subject to change.

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links. If you haven't received your voucher or have a question about your order, contact the Mental Floss shop here.

Here's the Very Best Time to Buy a New Car—and the Very Worst Time

If you want the best deal possible on a new car, it pays to know when to shop.
If you want the best deal possible on a new car, it pays to know when to shop.
Zero Creatives/iStock via Getty Images

Shopping for a new car can be a challenge. In addition to figuring out what make and model suits your lifestyle best, features and accessories can make the decision even more confusing. All of it affects the sale price, and even if the seller is willing to negotiate, it can be hard to know if you’re getting the best deal possible.

As it turns out, the time of year can have an enormous influence on the cost of the vehicle. If you want the greatest amount of leverage, try to buy in December. Here’s why.

According to MarketWatch, dealers are offered incentives by automobile manufacturers based on their sales volume. The dealer might receive a cash rebate, or they might get an opportunity to continue selling popular models. Depending on the manufacturer, they might even get a bonus for every car sold, making it worthwhile to sell a car at or below cost if it means getting hundreds of dollars more for every other car moved off the lot. Whatever the incentive, it benefits the dealer to move inventory.

Those quotas are typically measured by month, by quarter, and by year. In December, all of those goals come together, and a dealer is likely more willing to come down on the price of a vehicle to satisfy their sales objectives before the end of the calendar year.

Because quotas are measured monthly and quarterly, it also makes sense to try and buy at the end of the month or the end of a quarter—March, June, September, and December.

Remember that this approach works best for new cars. Used cars don’t normally have the same quotas or incentives attached. Because the value of trade-in cars increase toward the end of the year, you might find the best prices and selection in the fourth quarter.

More anecdotally, you might also find better deals on a Monday compared to the rest of the week, as less foot traffic means a salesperson probably has more time to find ways to save you money.

The worst time to buy? Avoid going early in the month. Dealers aren’t as concerned with meeting quotas. And avoid Saturdays. Because people tend to go car shopping on weekends, the rush of customers means dealers have less time to negotiate and more opportunities to sell.

[h/t MarketWatch]