The Most Popular Beard Style in Each State

Khosrork/iStock via Getty Images
Khosrork/iStock via Getty Images

Whether you’re planning to grow a beard to flaunt with flannels or protect your face from the soon-to-be crisp breeze, one thing’s for sure—you have plenty of options when it comes to choosing what it’ll look like. To give you an idea of what’s en vogue in your area, take a look at The Black Tux’s map of the most popular beard styles across the nation.

The breakdown is based on Google Trends data, which shows which style of facial hair is most often searched for in each state. And it’s not strictly beards: you can also find your favorite mustaches in the results.

The Black Tux map of popular beard by state
The Black Tux

Now, just because hordes of people happen to be Googling the Fu Manchu mustache in Ohio and Pennsylvania doesn’t necessarily mean that all (or even many) of those people actually end up growing one, but we dearly hope that they do.

Bafflingly, Californians don’t go for the so-called Hollywoodian as much as they go for a good chin curtain beard, while Texans do choose it above all others. Soul patches apparently steal the hearts of many Kansas residents, but no other state seems particularly fond of them. And, though many of the balmy southern states shy away from heavy facial hair, Louisiana loves a full beard. The Black Tux thinks residents may be influenced by the legendary beards of Duck Dynasty’s Robertson family.

Flashy facial hair styles like the Fu Manchu and handlebar mustaches certainly make the map more fun, but the overwhelming takeaway from the statistics is that most people are pretty traditional when it comes to which designs they’re willing to sport on their faces. The most popular styles in the highest number of states were the classics: 15 chose the goatee, followed by 10 for a regular mustache, and five for a full beard.

The Black Tux state list of most popular beards
The Black Tux

Regionally, the goatee reigned supreme in the south, northeast, and midwest, while the western states mostly went for the mustache.

The black Tux regional map of popular beards
The Black Tux

Will this autumn be the season you finally decide to fully partake in pogonotrophy—the act of cultivating facial hair? If this map didn’t convince you, maybe these reasons will.

[h/t The Black Tux]

The One-Day Record Snowfalls In Each State

Greenseas/iStock via Getty Images
Greenseas/iStock via Getty Images

Long after you’ve grown out of believing in magic, every thick, whirling snowstorm still seems to have been cast upon your town by a winter warlock (or Frozen’s resident ice queen, Elsa).

It’s also pretty magical when those inches of stacked snowflakes add up to a message from your manager telling you not to come into the office. In southern states like Georgia or Florida, sometimes all it takes is a light dusting.

But even those characteristically balmy places have hosted some serious snowstorms over the years, and David Cusick for House Method crunched the numbers to find out which ones made the record books. Using data from the National Centers for Environmental Information, Cusick created a map showing the one-day record snowfall for each state.

Florida finished in last place with a scant total of 4 inches, which occurred in Santa Rosa County on March 6, 1954. About two years before that, on January 14, 1952, Colorado had a staggering 76 inches—that’s more than 3 inches per hour—a national record that’s remained unchallenged for nearly 70 years.

Made with Flourish

But other states have come close. The snowstorm that hit Colorado in 1952 wreaked almost as much havoc in California, whose record from the same day was 75 inches. And Washington saw 70 inches of snow in November 1955, beating its 52-inch record from 1935 by a full 18 inches.

Though Midwestern states have gained a reputation for harsh, snowy winters, their one-day record snowfalls are surprisingly moderate. The Illinois and Indiana records are 24 and 26 inches, respectively, both slightly lower than Ohio’s 30-inch snow day from 1901. In 1993, North Carolina bested Ohio’s record by 6 inches.

Wondering how your individual county’s record compares to the overall state one? Cusick created a map for that, too, which you can explore below.

Made with Flourish

[h/t House Method]

Google Home vs. Alexa: Which Smart Device Does Your State Prefer?

Todd Williamson, Getty Images
Todd Williamson, Getty Images

If you're thinking of buying a loved one a smart home device for the holidays, you're likely considering two options: Google Home ($70)—a series of smart speakers from the tech giant—and Amazon Echo ($80)—which features the virtual voice assistant Alexa. You could do hours of research weighing the pros and cons of each gadget, or you could pick one based on where your giftee lives. The map below from ASecureLife.com breaks down where each state falls in the Google Home versus Alexa debate.

Map of Google Home vs. Alexa searches.
ASecureLife.com

To create the graphic, the home security company analyzed Google trends data related to searches for Google Home and Amazon Alexa in October 2019. The two terms are fairly evenly matched: Google Home just edges out Alexa with 51 percent of the total search volume nationwide compared to Alex's 49 percent.

The two devices are also spread out across the map. On the West Coast, California and Washington prefer Google, while Oregon likes Alexa. In the South, Alexa dominates Florida, Alabama, and North Carolina, while Google takes Mississippi, Georgia, and Tennessee. New England is split between the two: Google wins New Hampshire, Connecticut, and Massachusetts, and Alexa tops searches in Maine, Rhode Island, and Vermont. You can check out the full map above.

Google Home and Amazon Echo share a lot of the same capabilities, like connecting with the internet and other devices to set the thermostat, turn off the lights, play music, and answer questions. If your home state's search trends aren't enough to convince you to choose one over the other, you may have to look at more obscure details, such as which one is better at understanding accents and which has the best jokes.

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