Whirlpool Just Recalled More Than 26,000 Glass Cooktops for Turning On By Themselves

Cunaplus_M.Faba/iStock via Getty Images
Cunaplus_M.Faba/iStock via Getty Images

After receiving 133 reports of glass cooktops turning on by themselves, Whirlpool has recalled more than 26,000 of the appliances.

CBS Sacramento reports that the cooktops in question are both radiant and downdraft radiant models with glass cooking surfaces and touch controls, and they were all sold between March 2017 and August 2019, for $1150 to $2500. According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the appliances bear the brand names Whirlpool, KitchenAid, or JennAir (the Whirlpool Corporation owns KitchenAid and JennAir) and were sold in home improvement and appliance stores, including Lowe’s, Home Depot, and Best Buy, both in person and online.

In other words, if you have a glass cooktop, it’s probably worth checking the model number and serial number, which should be printed on the underside of the appliance. Enter the numbers into Whirlpool’s online form to determine if yours was recalled. If it was, Whirlpool will install a new one free of charge. In the meantime, the CPSC advises that you turn off the unit at the circuit breaker when you’re not using it, and don’t leave flammable objects or empty cookware on or around the area.

Thankfully, the faulty cooktops haven’t gravely injured anybody, but they have caused a fair amount of damage. There have been 14 reports of heat damage to nearby items, four reports of fire, and one report of property damage, and two people have sustained minor burn injuries.

It’s not the only device that’s recently been recalled due to fire safety risks. Earlier this month, Apple issued a recall of more than 460,000 MacBook Pro batteries. Find out how to check if yours was affected here.

[h/t CBS Sacramento]

Romaine Lettuce Recalled After Another National E. Coli Outbreak

TomFoldes/iStock via Getty Images
TomFoldes/iStock via Getty Images

On Tuesday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a food safety alert cautioning people against eating any romaine lettuce grown in Salinas, California, due to potential E. coli contamination. According to NBC Washington, 67 cases of E. coli have been reported so far, and 39 people have been hospitalized.

The recall applies to any product that contains Salinas-grown romaine lettuce, including whole heads or hearts of romaine, organic or baby romaine, salad wraps with romaine, and packages of pre-cut lettuce or salad mixes with romaine.

In a statement, the CDC explained that most romaine lettuce products name the harvest location on the label, which might be printed on a sticker or directly on the packaging. You should toss all romaine products grown in Salinas, as well as anything that doesn’t specify a harvest location at all. If you’re not sure if there’s romaine in your salad mix or wrap, don’t take the chance—throw it out. However, no cases have been linked to hydroponic or greenhouse-grown romaine, so anything labeled “indoor grown” is technically still safe to eat.

Though the CDC is also advising restaurants and retailers to exercise the same caution and get rid of any romaine that might be from Salinas, it’s best for consumers to look at the labels in stores themselves or double-check with restaurant employees just to make sure.

You should also thoroughly clean and disinfect any parts of your refrigerator where you’ve stored romaine lettuce, to prevent bacteria from hitching a ride on your delicious Thanksgiving leftovers.

And, even if you live several states away from California, there’s still a pretty good chance that Salinas-grown romaine is shipped to your region—the E. coli cases have been reported in 19 states across the country, including Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin.

The Food and Drug Administration is still investigating the outbreak, but it has been confirmed that this particular strain of bacteria, E. coli O157:H7, is the same one responsible for recalls of leafy greens and romaine lettuce in 2017 and 2018, respectively.

[h/t NBC Washington]

Prepared Salads Sold at Target, Walmart, and Aldi Have Been Recalled Over E. Coli Concerns

samael334/iStock via Getty Images
samael334/iStock via Getty Images

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced on Thursday that Missa Bay, LLC is recalling more than 75,000 pounds of pre-packaged salads after one tested positive for E. coli. News Channel 9 in Chattanooga, Tennessee, reports that the products were made between October 14 and October 16, and were sold at Target, Aldi, Walmart, and other stores.

According to the USDA’s statement, the Maryland Department of Health found traces of E. coli O157:H7 on the lettuce in a Ready Pac Bistro Chicken Raised Without Antibiotics Caesar Salad, and all products with lettuce from the same lot are included in the recall. You can see the full list of salads here.

Missa Bay, LLC is based in Swedesboro, New Jersey, and they ship to these states: Alabama, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

If you have any salad bowls in your refrigerator at the moment, toss any with the establishment number “EST. 18502B” and “Use by” dates from October 29 through November 1. It’s a good opportunity to sweep the corners of your fridge for any other expired products, so you can make room for next week’s Thanksgiving leftovers.

Wondering how exactly how food contamination is discovered, tested, and dealt with? Find out the anatomy of a food recall here.

[h/t News Channel 9]

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