The 25 Most-Searched Halloween Costumes of 2019

evgenyatamanenko/iStock via Getty Images
evgenyatamanenko/iStock via Getty Images

Whether hunting for the perfect Halloween costume is your favorite sport or not, there’s a good chance you’re dressing up this year to some degree—and maybe you’ve even Googled around for costume ideas.

To see which costumes are ruling search bars this year, Google created Frightgeist, a website that analyzed Google Trends data to compile a list of the most-searched Halloween costumes during September.

Unsurprisingly, It and Stranger Things both made the list of terms, as did other pop culture bigwigs like Spider-Man, Chucky, and Fortnite. However, plenty of people still want to masquerade as less-trademarked characters: Witches were the runner-up to It, and dinosaurs, unicorns, rabbits, pirates, and mice all made the top 15.

There’s also a significant demographic of people who were likely inspired by what they’ve seen in movies and television series, but didn’t want to imitate it exactly: 1980s, clowns, and superheroes are all in the top 25.

The stats for couples’ costumes, though completely different, are another blend of high-profile pop culture icons and more generic Halloween classics. Google shared with us that Lilo and Stitch took the number one spot, followed by Bonnie and Clyde and then The Fairly Oddparents’ Cosmo and Wanda. The Bible is big this year, too: Adam and Eve and “angel and devil” both hit the top 15.

Toy Story 4 certainly seemed to leave a lasting impression on movie theater audiences everywhere. Not only did Toy Story come in at number 17 on the overall most-searched list, but Woody and Jessie took the number 12 spot on the couples’ list, and Forky and Bo Peep have both been on the rise since January of this year.

Though the It franchise may have outshined Pennywise as an individual on the main list, he’s apparently quite a popular costume idea when it comes to babies and dogs—the homicidal clown took the number four spot on both lists.

Browse the full list of 25 hottest costume searches below, and check out some of the best bargains in the Halloween costume market here.

  1. It

  1. Witch

  1. Spider-Man

  1. Dinosaur

  1. The Descendants

  1. Clown

  1. Fortnite

  1. Chucky

  1. 1980s

  1. Unicorn

  1. Rabbit

  1. Pirate

  1. Stranger Things

  1. Mouse

  1. Harley Quinn

  1. Superhero

  1. Toy Story

  1. Princess

  1. Doll

  1. Mermaid

  1. Devil

  1. Ninja

  1. Vampire

  1. Cheerleader

  1. Bear

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The Arlington National Cemetery Just Opened Its Time Capsule from 1915—See What’s Inside

That red ribbon is the literal "red tape" that we now use as an idiom to describe bureaucratic processes.
That red ribbon is the literal "red tape" that we now use as an idiom to describe bureaucratic processes.
Arlington National Cemetery, YouTube

In the decades following the Civil War, thousands of people assembled in Arlington National Cemetery’s James R. Tanner Amphitheater to honor the fallen soldiers each May on Decoration Day (which we now call Memorial Day). By the early 20th century, the event had grown so popular that Congress agreed to build a new, larger arena in its place: the Memorial Amphitheater.

When President Woodrow Wilson laid the cornerstone on October 13, 1915, it contained a copper box with documents and mementos that captured the spirit of the era. Though the contents weren’t kept a secret, you can now actually see them for yourself—on May 15, 2020, Arlington National Cemetery celebrated the centennial of the amphitheater’s dedication ceremony by opening the time capsule and displaying them in a virtual exhibit.

Inside the box was one of each coin used in 1915; uncirculated stamps bearing images of George Washington and Benjamin Franklin; an autographed photo of Wilson; a Bible signed by amphitheater architect Thomas Hastings; the dedication ceremony program; directories of both Congress and Washington D.C. residents; Civil War veterans’ pamphlets; four issues of local newspapers, including The Washington Post and The Washington Times; copies of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution; an American flag; and a map of Pierre Charles L’Enfant’s blueprints for building the city.

As Smithsonian.com reports, a few of those documents became outdated soon after being sealed in the box. The 1915 version of the Constitution had 17 amendments, but two new ones had been passed by the end of 1920: the 18th, prohibiting alcohol, and the 19th, giving women the right to vote. The American flag, on the other hand, was already inaccurate when it went into the time capsule. Though Arizona and New Mexico had both been annexed in 1912, bringing the state total to 48, the flag only included 46 stars.

Some of the items were wrapped in red tape, a seemingly insignificant detail that Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero found especially exciting.

“All of the records in the National Archives, when they were moved into that building, were carefully protected with wrappings that were held together with this red tape,” he said in a statement. “This is where the saying comes (from) about cutting through the red tape. It is actually—literally—the red tape.”

For the last few decades, the copper box shared its hollow cornerstone abode with another, less official time capsule: A Peter Pan-brand peanut butter jar, stuffed with business cards and other notes. The box had been relocated to the National Archives while the amphitheater underwent repairs in 1974, and the workers snuck the jar into the hollow when replacing it during the 1990s.

“It was sort of a rush job,” conservator Caitlin Smith told The Washington Post. “But you can understand the impulse to add your name to history.”

You can learn more about the history of the Memorial Amphitheater and discover more about the exhibit here.

[h/t Smithsonian.com]