Recall Alert: Nestlé Cookie Dough May Contain Bits of Rubber

ThitareeSarmkasat/iStock via Getty Images
ThitareeSarmkasat/iStock via Getty Images

The holiday season—a.k.a. cookie baking season—is officially upon us. Before heating up your oven, check the labels on any pre-made cookie dough mixtures you have in your fridge at home. As Newsweek reports, Nestlé has voluntarily recalled more than two dozen of its ready-to-bake cookie dough products after finding bits of rubber in some batches.

Some of Nestlé's most popular items, like the tubs and logs of its Toll House chocolate chip cookie dough, are included in the 2019 recall. The decision to pull the products was made after the company received reports of "food-grade pieces of rubber" in some cookie doughs. According to a statement from Nestlé, the source of the rubber contamination has been identified and fixed. No consumers have reported getting sick from the cookie dough so far.

The recall consists entirely of ready-to-bake refrigerated cookie doughs with a batch code anywhere from 9189 to 9295. To find a product's batch code, look on the back of the package for the number listed after the "use or freeze-by" date and before the number 5753. If you have any of the recalled items in your fridge, just throw them away.

Items under the Nestlé Toll House Morsels, Nestlé Toll House Ice Cream Sandwiches, Nestlé Toll House Edible Cookie Dough, or Nestlé Professionals labels are not affected by the recall and are safe to eat.

You can find all 26 products recalled by Nestlé in the list below.

Simply Delicious Nestlé Toll House Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough (18oz)
Simply Delicious Nestlé Toll House Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough (18oz)
Simply Delicious Nestlé Toll House Sugar Cookie Dough (18oz)
Nestlé Toll House Chocolate Chip Chub (16.5oz)
Nestlé Toll House Chocolate Chip Chub (30oz)
Nestlé Toll House Chocolate Chip Lovers Club Tub (80oz)
Nestlé Toll House Chocolate Chip Tub (36oz)
Nestlé Toll House Chocolate Chip Tub (80oz)
Nestlé Toll House Fall'n Leaves Cookie Dough (16oz)
Nestlé Toll House Frozen II Cookie Dough (14oz)
Nestlé Toll House Holiday Chocolate Chip Tree Sprinkle (16oz)
Nestlé Toll House Monster Munch (16oz)
Nestlé Toll House Pinch of Grinch Cookie Dough (14oz)
Nestlé Toll House Triple Chip Cookie Dough Bar (16oz)
Nestlé Toll House Ultimate Chocolate Chip Lovers (16oz)
Nestlé Toll House Ultimate Turtles Cookie Bar (16oz)
Nestlé Toll House White Chip Macadamia Nut (16oz)
Nestlé Toll House Chocolate Chip Bar (16.5oz)
Nestlé Toll House Mini Chocolate Chip Bar (16.5oz)
Nestlé Toll House Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Bar (16oz)
Nestlé Toll House Sugar Cookie Bar (16.5oz)
Nestlé Toll House Oatmeal Raisin Cookie Bar (16.5oz)
Nestlé Toll House Peanut Butter Cookie Bar (16oz)
M&M'S Everyday Cookie Dough (14oz)
M&M'S Ghouls Mix Cookie Dough (14oz)
M&M'S Holiday Cookie Dough (14oz)

[h/t Newsweek]

Turn Your LEGO Bricks Into a Drone With the Flybrix Drone Kit

Flyxbrix/FatBrain
Flyxbrix/FatBrain

Now more than ever, it’s important to have a good hobby. Of course, a lot of people—maybe even you—have been obsessed with learning TikTok dances and baking sourdough bread for the last few months, but those hobbies can wear out their welcome pretty fast. So if you or someone you love is looking for something that’s a little more intellectually stimulating, you need to check out the Flybrix LEGO drone kit from Fat Brain Toys.

What is a Flybrix LEGO Drone Kit?

The Flybrix drone kit lets you build your own drones out of LEGO bricks and fly them around your house using your smartphone as a remote control (via Bluetooth). The kit itself comes with absolutely everything you need to start flying almost immediately, including a bag of 56-plus LEGO bricks, a LEGO figure pilot, eight quick-connect motors, eight propellers, a propeller wrench, a pre-programmed Flybrix flight board PCB, a USB data cord, a LiPo battery, and a USB LiPo battery charger. All you’ll have to do is download the Flybrix Configuration Software, the Bluetooth Flight Control App, and access online instructions and tutorials.

Experiment with your own designs.

The Flybrix LEGO drone kit is specifically designed to promote exploration and experimentation. All the components are tough and can totally withstand a few crash landings, so you can build and rebuild your own drones until you come up with the perfect design. Then you can do it all again. Try different motor arrangements, add your own LEGO bricks, experiment with different shapes—this kit is a wannabe engineer’s dream.

For the more advanced STEM learners out there, Flybrix lets you experiment with coding and block-based coding. It uses an arduino-based hackable circuit board, and the Flybrix app has advanced features that let you try your hand at software design.

Who is the Flybrix LEGO Drone Kit for?

Flybrix is a really fun way to introduce a number of core STEM concepts, which makes it ideal for kids—and technically, that’s who it was designed for. But because engineering and coding can get a little complicated, the recommended age for independent experimentation is 13 and up. However, kids younger than 13 can certainly work on Flybrix drones with the help of their parents. In fact, it actually makes a fantastic family hobby.

Ready to start building your own LEGO drones? Click here to order your Flybrix kit today for $198.

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Romaine Lettuce Recalled After Another National E. Coli Outbreak

TomFoldes/iStock via Getty Images
TomFoldes/iStock via Getty Images

On Tuesday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a food safety alert cautioning people against eating any romaine lettuce grown in Salinas, California, due to potential E. coli contamination. According to NBC Washington, 67 cases of E. coli have been reported so far, and 39 people have been hospitalized.

The recall applies to any product that contains Salinas-grown romaine lettuce, including whole heads or hearts of romaine, organic or baby romaine, salad wraps with romaine, and packages of pre-cut lettuce or salad mixes with romaine.

In a statement, the CDC explained that most romaine lettuce products name the harvest location on the label, which might be printed on a sticker or directly on the packaging. You should toss all romaine products grown in Salinas, as well as anything that doesn’t specify a harvest location at all. If you’re not sure if there’s romaine in your salad mix or wrap, don’t take the chance—throw it out. However, no cases have been linked to hydroponic or greenhouse-grown romaine, so anything labeled “indoor grown” is technically still safe to eat.

Though the CDC is also advising restaurants and retailers to exercise the same caution and get rid of any romaine that might be from Salinas, it’s best for consumers to look at the labels in stores themselves or double-check with restaurant employees just to make sure.

You should also thoroughly clean and disinfect any parts of your refrigerator where you’ve stored romaine lettuce, to prevent bacteria from hitching a ride on your delicious Thanksgiving leftovers.

And, even if you live several states away from California, there’s still a pretty good chance that Salinas-grown romaine is shipped to your region—the E. coli cases have been reported in 19 states across the country, including Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin.

The Food and Drug Administration is still investigating the outbreak, but it has been confirmed that this particular strain of bacteria, E. coli O157:H7, is the same one responsible for recalls of leafy greens and romaine lettuce in 2017 and 2018, respectively.

[h/t NBC Washington]