New Jersey Is the Latest State to Push for Cursive in the Classroom

Ridofranz/iStock via Getty Images
Ridofranz/iStock via Getty Images

If you happen to have spent some time with kids who graduated from elementary school in the last decade or so, you may notice they have little idea how to form the graceful Gs and 2-shaped Qs of cursive—or any other cursive letter, for that matter. The cursive alphabet was cut from the Common Core curriculum in 2010, and it’s been making those of us who learned it feel old ever since.

However, a number of states—most recently, Texas—have elected to reintroduce cursive into schools in the last few years, and New Jersey is hoping to follow suit. According to WPEC, Assemblywoman Angela McKnight is sponsoring a bill that would require students to master reading and writing in cursive by the end of third grade.

“Our world has indeed become increasingly dependent on technology, but how will our students ever know how to read a scripted font on a Word document, or even sign the back of a check, if they never learn to read and write in cursive?” McKnight asked in a press release. “This bill will ensure every young student in New Jersey will have this valuable skill to carry with them into adulthood.”

Opponents could make the argument that physical checks and scripted fonts are well on their way to becoming relics of the past right alongside cursive literacy, but it’s not just real-world applications that make learning the loopy alphabet such a valuable skill.

“Some research suggests that learning to read and write in cursive benefits the development of cognitive, motor, and literacy skills,” the bill says. “In addition, instruction in cursive handwriting has been associated with improved academic outcomes for students with learning disabilities such as dyslexia.”

It may also increase your SAT scores, improve your spelling, and more—read about its other benefits here.

[h/t WPEC]

Friday’s Best Amazon Deals Include Digital Projectors, Ugly Christmas Sweaters, and Speakers

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The Oldest Schools in Each Country

Schools across the globe have been around for centuries.
Schools across the globe have been around for centuries.
Online Schools Report

There's something about a school or university with a long history that amplifies its reputation. Well-established institutions of higher learning feel like they have centuries of information to impart—and sometimes, they do.

The online university consultants at Online Schools Report recently compiled data looking at the oldest schools and universities still in operation in every country. You might be surprised how far back some of these schools go. (Click on the maps to see them in full size.)



The oldest is Shishi High School in China, which was established around 141 BCE. England’s King’s School Canterbury opened in 597 AD. Tunisia’s Université Zitouna existed in 737 AD, while Germany’s Gymnasium Paulinum debuted in 797 AD.

Overall, Europe has 19 schools that are more than 500 years old and Africa has four universities that are over 1000 years old.


In North America, the Collegiate School in New York opened its doors in 1638, when New York was still known as New Amsterdam. (The name of the state changed in 1664.)


In Europe, the University of Bologna, which was established in 1088, might have been the first to use universitas, or university, to refer to teachers and scholars.


In Africa, there’s been some debate over whether the Université Zitouna is the world’s oldest university, but only because it was reformed and renamed in the 20th century, interrupting the concept of oldest continuously operating institution.

To view maps for South America and Asia, head over to Online Schools Report.