Florida is known for its extreme weather, but a recent alert issued in Miami on Tuesday, January 21 was strange even for locals. As CNN reports, the National Weather Service's South Florida bureau warned of iguanas falling from the trees as temperatures approached freezing.

Thermometers rarely read below 50°F in South Florida, but this week temperatures dropped into the 40s and 30s. At higher latitudes, a chilly forecast means you should probably wear a coat, but in tropical regions, you may need to grab an umbrella as well to protect yourself from iguana showers.

The invasive reptile species is cold-blooded, which means its body temperature is dependent on its environment rather than self-regulated. Many iguanas never have to deal with cold snaps, but when temperatures do plummet, they have an adaptation that helps them survive. If it's colder than 50°F, the lizards become lethargic, and if it drops below 45°F, they enter a catatonic state. Their lungs still work, their heart still beats, but nonessential body functions shut down in order to conserve energy. The video below shows iguanas in this state during a cold Florida winter two years ago.

Those dodging falling iguanas can take comfort in the fact that the creatures aren't necessarily dead, even if they appear to be. But the clever survival trick only works for so long. After enduring near-freezing temperatures for eight hours or longer, dormant iguanas start to die. Fortunately for Miami residents of all species, temperatures there are expected to reach a high of 65°F later today.

[h/t CNN]